S2 6.7 Junk Rig Conversion

  • 11 Aug 2021 13:29
    Reply # 10924582 on 10922482
    Scott wrote:
    Mark wrote:

    On the subject of lifelines..which probably should be a separate thread…think what happens if you go over the side sailing singlehanded. [..,]

    Mark,

    My intention is to get setup so that I can't possibly fall out of the cockpit at all. With my junk rig now functional I do not need to leave the cockpit for any normal sail handling.

    I expect a harness rigged to hold me down to a point in the center of the cockpit should make it just about impossible for me to get thrown off the boat. If I go over the side while I am underway then, in my judgement, it is already too late.

    If somehow the boat starts sinking and I absolutely HAVE to get off the boat, then my plan is a full length wetsuit, a static PFD, and my hand held VHF with GPS and DSC. I decided this was as close as I could get to carrying a life raft on a 22 foot trailer sailer.

    I agree with your reasoning, Scott. For going forward, jackstays as near the centreline as possible, with a tether that only just reaches the deck. In the cockpit, a short tether to a central hoop. The aim is not to be able to fall over the guard wires when hooked on. All that a long tether gives is a false sense of security.  I use a simple waist belt with an arms-length tether.

    I bought a foam lined floatation suit, many years ago. Never used it in earnest. Never will, now.

  • 11 Aug 2021 12:05
    Reply # 10924468 on 6872873

    Scott,

    with you about a harness line that does not allow you out of the cockpit..but when you really need it is in an emergency and you have to rush up forward.  A longer one also allows you to go below without taking it off. 
    Have a look for survival suits on EBay, I got a Guy Cotton ex North Sea suit for less than £100. About £700 new.  

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  • 11 Aug 2021 08:23
    Reply # 10924211 on 6872873

    For your consideration Scott fellow JRA member David Omnick has developed a mizzen sail self steering system for Minimus ll, his JR Catamaran, and his trailerable Bermudan Mono that is fascinating.

    You can read about it here.

    There are links in the article to videos of the system in action on his Windrose 18 (5.5m) swing keel monohull. (see picture below)

    I particularly like that the system does double duty as an anchor riding sail.

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  • 11 Aug 2021 06:29
    Reply # 10924080 on 6872873

    Yes, you've correctly understood what I did, but this is not the only way, and indeed may not be the best way. Working with both parts made from hardwood, I'd use a tongue and groove joint, with the grain of the tongue going across the joint, not along it.

  • 10 Aug 2021 16:03
    Reply # 10922522 on 10757423
    David wrote:

    Boats with a spade rudder and no skeg are inherently course unstable. Your boat is, and so is Weaverbird

    A self steering gear for such boats must add the stability that is missing.

    The OGT does not do this. A trim tab does not do this.

    [...]Only a servo pendulum gear does a fully reliable job of adding the yaw damping feature that such boats need to make them course stable. [...]

    That is why I developed the two pendulum gears for which there are drawings in  https://junkrigassociation.org/members_files > drawings > David's vane gear drawings.

    I have to recommend that either you build one of these, or you take the easier option of installing an electric autopilot. For short passages in good weather, the latter should serve reasonably well.

    David,

    I found your argument convincing. After spending some time sailing down wind in smaller waves I think I finally understand the yawing motion of my boat and why I need some sort of appendage in the water to keep the stern from getting pushed from side to side. 

    I have been studying your drawings, reading through your topic here, and building the vane in my head. There is one construction detail that I may not understand correctly.

    You wrote this:

    • The top part of the servo blade is another piece of strong, stable hardwood, section 63mm x 25mm. It is strong bonded and dowelled to the underwater part of the servo blade. This is assembled from solid pultruded GRP sections: 10mm diameter, rectangular 50mm x 12mm and rectangular 45mm x 6mm, all faired in together to form a foil section.

    The "dowelled" part is where I have doubts. Did you drill large holes into both the top section (wood) and the underwater part (GRP) and then use round wood dowels to attach the two sections together? I included an image showing roughly what I am describing. Getting this part 'right' seems important. I expect this is the most stressed joint in the system.

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    Last modified: 10 Aug 2021 16:06 | Anonymous member
  • 10 Aug 2021 15:36
    Reply # 10922482 on 10922071
    Mark wrote:

    On the subject of lifelines..which probably should be a separate thread…think what happens if you go over the side sailing singlehanded. [..,]

    Mark,

    My intention is to get setup so that I can't possibly fall out of the cockpit at all. With my junk rig now functional I do not need to leave the cockpit for any normal sail handling.

    I expect a harness rigged to hold me down to a point in the center of the cockpit should make it just about impossible for me to get thrown off the boat. If I go over the side while I am underway then, in my judgement, it is already too late.

    If somehow the boat starts sinking and I absolutely HAVE to get off the boat, then my plan is a full length wetsuit, a static PFD, and my hand held VHF with GPS and DSC. I decided this was as close as I could get to carrying a life raft on a 22 foot trailer sailer.

    Last modified: 10 Aug 2021 15:44 | Anonymous member
  • 10 Aug 2021 15:29
    Reply # 10922467 on 10921808
    David wrote:I am trying to get into the habit of wearing my inflatable PFD whenever I am out on the boat by myself. I don't find it too uncomfortable to wear. If sailing in rougher weather I will also use the harness attachment. It is so easy to fall off a small boat which does not have any life lines, but having reached the ripe old age of 68, and still wanting to enjoy a few more good years of sailing, and life, I think I would be pretty pissed off with myself if I fell overboard with no PFD, and drowning was imminent, and I could have avoided an untimely end by just wearing my life jacket and harness. 

    David,

    My inflatable PFD starts to feel heavy on my neck after a couple of hours. That is the only discomfort as long as the weather is not too hot. When it is 90 degrees F, like it has been this week, all those layers of start to feel like a winter coat.

    I also have a hard time trusting my inflatable in general. If it does inflate then I am sure it will turn me face up in the water and keep me floating. But if it malfunctions, or gets punctured, then it will weigh me down and make it difficult, or impossible, to swim.

    For several years now I have been trying to find a reasonably priced static (foam) PFD with an integral harness. I personally think my static PFD is comfortable and protects me from bumping into things. I am sure that it will float even if it was punctured several times.

    The only ones I can find have the tether attachment in the back of the PFD, to be used for lifting or lowering a person during a Search and Rescue operation. I want something that will hold me DOWN in the cockpit and be easy to clip and unclip from the front.

    Maybe I will try to hand sew some seat belt webbing around my static PFD.

    Last modified: 10 Aug 2021 16:04 | Anonymous member
  • 10 Aug 2021 11:27
    Reply # 10922071 on 6872873

    On the subject of lifelines..which probably should be a separate thread…think what happens if you go over the side sailing singlehanded.

    I understand that at  speed, with most harness lines, you will be dragged alongside with your head under water, unable to reach the gunwale.
    I use a long line that allows me to flat behind the stern, linked to this line is a thin line that lifts off the autopilot and releases the jib sheet. 

    A low attachment point, such as climbers use, should drag you feet first, hopefully with your head out of the water.  That said my life jacket has an integrated harness so I use that. 

    I have to admit I never put these theories to practice.  It will be interesting to hear from anyone who has been over the side.

  • 10 Aug 2021 07:53
    Reply # 10921808 on 10921277
    Scott wrote:

    I usually wear my inflatable PFD with an integral harness when I sail any further than the distance I think I can swim. But it is not all that comfortable, tends to snag on the lines sometimes and now that it is August it is just too hot to wear all the time.

    I looked into buying a purpose-made harness and tether. The prices reminded me why I don't already have one.

    So, I did my best to imitate a simple harness using the thread and seatbelt webbing left over from making my sail. It is not perfect, but it was basically free. It only took me about an hour on the sewing machine to make it. I feel safer wearing it. I hope my feeling is right!

    If you can't tie a knot, then tie a lot. That goes for stitching too, right?

    I am trying to get into the habit of wearing my inflatable PFD whenever I am out on the boat by myself. I don't find it too uncomfortable to wear. If sailing in rougher weather I will also use the harness attachment. It is so easy to fall off a small boat which does not have any life lines, but having reached the ripe old age of 68, and still wanting to enjoy a few more good years of sailing, and life, I think I would be pretty pissed off with myself if I fell overboard with no PFD, and drowning was imminent, and I could have avoided an untimely end by just wearing my life jacket and harness. 
  • 10 Aug 2021 01:58
    Reply # 10921277 on 6872873

    I usually wear my inflatable PFD with an integral harness when I sail any further than the distance I think I can swim. But it is not all that comfortable, tends to snag on the lines sometimes and now that it is August it is just too hot to wear all the time.

    I looked into buying a purpose-made harness and tether. The prices reminded me why I don't already have one.

    So, I did my best to imitate a simple harness using the thread and seatbelt webbing left over from making my sail. It is not perfect, but it was basically free. It only took me about an hour on the sewing machine to make it. I feel safer wearing it. I hope my feeling is right!

    If you can't tie a knot, then tie a lot. That goes for stitching too, right?

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    Last modified: 10 Aug 2021 02:00 | Anonymous member
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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