S2 6.7 Junk Rig Conversion

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  • 31 Aug 2021 23:16
    Reply # 10972875 on 6872873

    I posted this video showing the current state of the rig on my S2. I think this is likely the end of rig updates for this season. Unless something breaks I will spend the remainder of the summer sailing and not fussing with the rigging.

    There are three recent changes (that I can remember).

    1. I could never get the leech of the sail to sit flush with the battens using outhauls. This would cause many snags while hoisting the sail. I gave up and made holes through the sail at each batten and directly bolted the sail to the existing holes in the battens. After trying a couple of different strategies I ended up using a cordless drill the make the holes and my butane hot knife to fuse the material before bolting it all together.

    2. The way I had the Tack Line rigged caused the line to chafe and almost destroy itself. I put shackles on the large rubber bungee and used a larger polyester line to attach it to the boom. This seems to be more robust.

    3. The block for the Throat Hauling Parrel was tied on with small polyester cord. This was also about half way eaten up by chafe. I replaced this with a shackle. It seems very strong now. Hopefully it is, at least, 'good enough'.

  • 31 Aug 2021 23:05
    Reply # 10972867 on 10953381
    Arne wrote:

    [...]That red and white material is just tape. I put it under the hose clamps to avoid corrosion, and I didn’t bother with removing it when going Dyneema. Thanks to that little white ‘safety string', that lashing will never slip.[...]

    Hi Arne,

    Thank you for answering my question about the tape. Is there some reason why you used Dyneema? The low stretch and high strength properties do not seem to be critical in this application. I think Dyneema is also relatively slippery rope, meaning it does not hold knots as well as something like polyester.

    I would like to use your method to attach the my batten parrels. I am too cheap to buy Dyneema unless it is necessary.

  • 29 Aug 2021 01:40
    Reply # 10965202 on 10956656
    Anonymous wrote:

    There is not much wrong in using hose clamps, as I have used them for years. Just wrap some stout tape over them to cover the nuts and pointy bits. Later, if these turn out to rust, they can be replaced with some sort of rolling hitch.

    Good luck!
    Arne


    Will do Arne.
  • 27 Aug 2021 14:32
    Reply # 10960946 on 10956656
    Arne wrote:

    [...] Our summer doesn’t last forever, and the fine days we still enjoy here, must be spent on better things than writing. [...]

    The daylight is getting noticeably shorter now. I went out to fuss with the aft ends of the battens on Thread  last week, to get them lined up flush with the sail. I ended up doing most of the work with a head lamp in the dark. The days with sunset around 9:30 and twilight until after 10:00pm are gone already!

    Last modified: 27 Aug 2021 18:16 | Anonymous member
  • 25 Aug 2021 21:38
    Reply # 10956656 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Sorry, Hans-Erik,

    but I am a little pressed for times these days. Our summer doesn’t last forever, and the fine days we still enjoy here, must be spent on better things than writing. These days I am spending the mornings painting a wall on my house (before the wind picks up and the sun starts shining on the wall), and in the afternoons I like to sail, but this night I got a call from Svein Magnus in Samson, so tomorrow I will go up the  in Samson’s main mast to sort out a halyard  -  maybe followed by a test sail.

    There is not much wrong in using hose clamps, as I have used them for years. Just wrap some stout tape over them to cover the nuts and pointy bits. Later, if these turn out to rust, they can be replaced with some sort of rolling hitch.

    Good luck!
    Arne


    Last modified: 26 Aug 2021 22:43 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 25 Aug 2021 09:04
    Reply # 10955067 on 10953023
    Anonymous wrote:
    I plan to make a more comprehensive write-up about it, and then incorporate the lashing of the halyard to the yard.

    Cheers,
    Arne

    So that was the plan you came up with.
    I had read about your intention to try an alternative way to secure the batten parrels and HK parrels and was literally about to email you to ask if you had.
    Since the 'rigging' of Jasmine's sail is soon to become real I for one eagerly await your write up.
    Fair Winds,
    Hans-Erik
    Last modified: 25 Aug 2021 09:07 | Anonymous member
  • 24 Aug 2021 17:33
    Reply # 10953381 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Scott,
    my other reason for not just replacing the rusty hose clamps with new ones, is the same as yours  -  to avoid ‘screw heads and pointy parts’. That said; there has been no damages caused by these.

    That red and white material is just tape. I put it under the hose clamps to avoid corrosion, and I didn’t bother with removing it when going Dyneema. Thanks to that little white ‘safety string, that lashing will never slip.

    Arne


    Last modified: 24 Aug 2021 22:10 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 24 Aug 2021 16:36
    Reply # 10953215 on 10953023
    Arne wrote:

    This weekend, before going on a Sunday sail, I replaced all those hoseclamps on the battens with firm lashings of 2mm Dyneema line. The reason was that the hoseclamps bled rust onto the sail. The method appeared to work very well. The lashing, generally consisting of 4-6 single overhand knots, was tied as firmly as I could without tools, and then the final knot was tripled and fused. This is not nearly as taut as the hoseclamp, so a little helping line was added to the backside of it and then stitched to the batten pocked (see white string). Its job is just to get the rolling hitch effect of the lashing ’started’. There is no load to speak of at that white string when the rolling hitch effect of the lashing sets in.

    I plan to make a more comprehensive write-up about it, and then incorporate the lashing of the halyard to the yard.

    Cheers,
    Arne


    I thought about using hose clamps but I could never bring myself to accept having screw heads and other pointy parts of the clamps right where the sail bundle stacks up firmly against the mast.

    The simple hitches I have at this location, aft of the mast, have not given me any problems. Honestly they look like they would work themselves loose, but they have not.

    I have the batten parrels running out to the forward end of the batten and then each one looping back on itself and held there with a rolling hitch. This is the hitch that is 'pushed' by the mast and slips over time.

    Arne, what is the red and white material under the Dyneema lashing? I have been thinking about doing something similar, but using the same grip tape (friction tape) I used to attach the halyard

    Scott.

  • 24 Aug 2021 15:41
    Reply # 10953023 on 10938788
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Scott,

    I cannot recall who wrote about having cut up his wife's yoga mat to pad the vinyl batten pockets at the mast but thought it such a great idea.

    Not having a wife, let alone one who has a yoga mat, I purchased two to use in making the sail for Jasmine.

    As to the 'slippage' of your batten parrels I am using 25mm webbing and plan to attach them to the battens as Arne did on Ingeborg using hose clamps.





    This weekend, before going on a Sunday sail, I replaced all those hoseclamps on the battens with firm lashings of 2mm Dyneema line. The reason was that the hoseclamps bled rust onto the sail. The method appeared to work very well. The lashing, generally consisting of 4-6 single overhand knots, was tied as firmly as I could without tools, and then the final knot was tripled and fused. This is not nearly as taut as the hoseclamp, so a little helping line was added to the backside of it and then stitched to the batten pocked (see white string). Its job is just to get the rolling hitch effect of the lashing ’started’. There is no load to speak of at that white string when the rolling hitch effect of the lashing sets in.

    I plan to make a more comprehensive write-up about it, and then incorporate the lashing of the halyard to the yard.

    Cheers,
    Arne


  • 24 Aug 2021 14:40
    Reply # 10952844 on 6872873

    I just finished reading an interesting article about a traditional Chinese junk.

    5 fishermen, a diplomat and 2 hens: Over 60 years ago, they crossed the Pacific in a Chinese junk boat

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