S2 6.7 Junk Rig Conversion

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  • 07 Feb 2019 13:31
    Reply # 7151751 on 7144500
    Anonymous wrote:

    [...] I suggest you make a test piece which is exactly to Arne's method B seam and batten pocket, but with straight edges. It need only be a foot or so long. Lay two pieces of cloth a foot square one on top of the other, and sew with straight stitch 3/4in from the edge (no more) to join them. Cut a piece of cloth a foot long, and wide enough to make a pocket 20% bigger than your batten diameter - I'm guessing 7in. Stitch this on according to method B, either straight or zigzag stitch. If you can do this, you can make a sail according to Arne's methods. [...]

    Done. After making this mock up I have some confidence back. I understand the value of keeping the seam allowance (no idea what the sail making term would be, if there is one) for joining the panels smaller, 3/4", as you suggested. Thank you David, and Arne.

    Now I need to get in the right state of mind to click 'order' and actually buy the cloth. The vendor does not seem interested in giving me any quantity breaks, so I think I may order 25 linear yards and then make a second order if (when?) I mess up a panel so bad that the cloth must be discarded.

    Last modified: 07 Feb 2019 14:23 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Feb 2019 16:30
    Reply # 7145789 on 6872873

    My rule of thumb is the nett area x 1.6, which would come out at 25 linear yards. I think you're about right, given that when you're not used to sailmaking (or even when you are), there's a risk of needing to re-make a panel.

    Last modified: 04 Feb 2019 17:38 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Feb 2019 15:23
    Reply # 7145652 on 6872873

    I am ready to order some cloth. I am thinking I need 29 yards of the WM65. It is 61 inches wide. Is this a good amount for the 22 sq meter sail I plan to build, including batten pockets? Is this maybe too much or not enough?

  • 03 Feb 2019 21:01
    Reply # 7144667 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Flat or zig-zag, both works. All my sails have been constructed with zig-zag only. My main reason has been that it is so much quicker to rip a faulty zig-zag seam…

    Arne

    Last modified: 03 Feb 2019 21:02 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 03 Feb 2019 20:32
    Reply # 7144568 on 7144500
    Anonymous wrote:

    [...] and sew with straight stitch 3/4in from the edge (no more) to join them. [ ...]


    Thank you, David. I got it in my head that a straight stitch should never be used on a sail. I will use a straight stitch along the batten lines. This makes sense.

  • 03 Feb 2019 20:01
    Reply # 7144543 on 7144505
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    David wrote:

    You're getting there!

    What Arne describes in fig 5.1 is known as a flat seam, or run-and-fell seam. It's what distinguishes jeans from all other garments, and is also commonly used on things like tents, where seam strength is needed.


    The local sailmaker who taught me this special version of flat seam, called it a 'French seam'. It has the advantage of letting one make the first joining seam without needing any sort of basting first. When the first simple seam has been added, it is easier to roll up canvas and run it through under the arm of the sewing machine.

    Arne

  • 03 Feb 2019 19:39
    Reply # 7144505 on 7144443
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    "The worse it looks, the better it sails". 

    Arne


    If this is true then then I am on my way to owning the best sailing boat ever!

    Just now I ripped out the seam joining the two panels and stitched it up again, shifted slightly. The luff and leach look more like what I imagined now (straighter lines).

    I also tried out joining two sections as described in TCPJR. That technique is so clever and simple that even I got the expected result.

    In all seriousness -- Is what I mocked up really close enough to 'right'?

    You're getting there!

    What Arne describes in fig 5.1 is known as a flat seam, or run-and-fell seam. It's what distinguishes jeans from all other garments, and is also commonly used on things like tents, where seam strength is needed.

  • 03 Feb 2019 19:33
    Reply # 7144500 on 6872873

    That's strange about the smell of the tape. I wonder who is supplying Sailrite? I've just bought some tape that looks exactly like https://www.sailrite.com/Seamstick-3-8-for-Canvas-60-Yds with no branding visible. My throat is very sensitive too, and aromatics will have me spluttering, but I can put this tape literally against my nose and can't smell anything. Neither could I with the tape I bought previously, which was branded 3M.

    I agree with Arne about the effect of scale. You are trying to do full size seams and hems on a small piece of cloth, and it's bound to be difficult.

    I suggest you make a test piece which is exactly to Arne's method B seam and batten pocket, but with straight edges. It need only be a foot or so long. Lay two pieces of cloth a foot square one on top of the other, and sew with straight stitch 3/4in from the edge (no more) to join them. Cut a piece of cloth a foot long, and wide enough to make a pocket 20% bigger than your batten diameter - I'm guessing 7in. Stitch this on according to method B, either straight or zigzag stitch. If you can do this, you can make a sail according to Arne's methods. The hems (tablings in sailmaker's parlance) are straight, so whether you do them the way I do them in canvas, turned in twice, or Arne's way, turned in once with webbing on top, they shouldn't present any difficulty.

    Don't worry about curved edges, they get easier at full size. 

  • 03 Feb 2019 19:12
    Reply # 7144443 on 7144213
    Anonymous wrote:

    "The worse it looks, the better it sails". 

    Arne


    If this is true then then I am on my way to owning the best sailing boat ever!

    Just now I ripped out the seam joining the two panels and stitched it up again, shifted slightly. The luff and leach look more like what I imagined now (straighter lines).

    I also tried out joining two sections as described in TCPJR. That technique is so clever and simple that even I got the expected result.

    In all seriousness -- Is what I mocked up really close enough to 'right'? [edit: removed the bold. I did not mean to shout.]

    Last modified: 03 Feb 2019 20:24 | Anonymous member
  • 03 Feb 2019 16:41
    Reply # 7144213 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Scott, remember, the round curve of your miniature panels is much sharper than on a full size panel. That ridge may look 'wrinkly' when you open up the panel, but that isn't needed until after you have added the batten pocket on top of it, so the wrinkles will not show.  

    When I made my first cambered panel sail, I was quite sceptical myself, when seeing those wrinkles,  but I kept saying:
    "The worse it looks, the better it sails". The result was the blue, cambered sail of Malena. It performed well and lasted for 16 years.

    Arne

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