SibLim update

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  • 03 Oct 2019 10:41
    Reply # 7915795 on 7908858
    Anne Hill wrote:

    As for the meths, while I can go into any village store and buy a litre, I don't want all the packaging.  I can take my 20l containers into Wynn Fraser and they will fill them with either meths or ethanol.  However, I don't want to be coming in and out of Whangarei every few weeks.  I actually will have 80 litres on board, but judging by past consumption, that will only last me for just over 6 months.  I must do a lot more cooking than you do!  But it will be nice to be independent of the city for months on end.

    Interesting subject, the amount of spirit to carry.  As Annie says, it depends on how much cooking you do. I am a basic cook and I use about one litre a week.  But it is lucky we don't live in California.  If Cruiser's Forum is to be believed, the State Legislature of California has banned the sale of denatured alcohol and people with spirit stoves are howling with rage.  Some are threatening to start bootlegging from Nevada.
  • 01 Oct 2019 14:22
    Reply # 7912514 on 7911146
    Anonymous wrote:

    I believe that sucking the air out of the cabin with the suggested small fan is more effective at ventilation than blowing air into the cabin.  

    Creates an ever-so-slight pressure drop in the cabin which then sucks in fresh air through another open port or washboard.  


    The exception would be when a cabin heater that has a natural draught up a flue is in operation. These, whether diesel or solid fuel, need slight positive air pressure in the cabin, or fumes leak out.
  • 01 Oct 2019 14:00
    Reply # 7911294 on 4315719

    Yes, I agree. The Airhead that I had in Tystie came with such a 12V fan, and it was effective at extracting odours through a 1 1/2" hose.

    This has reminded me that it would be a good idea to put an extractor fan + vent over the galley in Weaverbird, to deal with combustion fumes that I suspect of giving me a troublesome cough.

    Extracting water vapour, combustion fumes and odours through a 1 1/2" skin fitting all seem to be worthwhile uses for these little 40mm fans, at a current draw of only ~ 100mA.

    Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 14:09 | Anonymous member
  • 01 Oct 2019 11:50
    Reply # 7911146 on 4315719

    I believe that sucking the air out of the cabin with the suggested small fan is more effective at ventilation than blowing air into the cabin.  

    Creates an ever-so-slight pressure drop in the cabin which then sucks in fresh air through another open port or washboard.  

    Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 11:52 | Anonymous member
  • 01 Oct 2019 03:38
    Reply # 7910767 on 7907541
    Anonymous wrote:

     I've given a certain amount of thought to additional ventilation in the boat.  While the Air-only dorade that I fitted should be adequate most of the time, I am concerned that in winter, with the boat shut up against wind and rain and the fire lit, there won't be sufficient air coming into the boat.  I have added a sort of dorade arrangement within the deck box.  Under the locker top and well inboard, it would take a catastrophe for water to enter - and I would probably have more to worry about than a few litres of water in the lazarette at that stage.  I used skin fittings - the pipe is very strong and glues into place with epoxy.  I just put them in temporarily for the moment, to make it easier to paint out the lockers.

    Very good. I always intended to do that on Tystie, to ventilate the lazarette and reduce the amount of condensation in winter, but never got a Round Tuit.

    A good way to get air moving through the boat is to use a small 12 volt DC brushless computer fan built into a vent. They are available in small diameters, are almost silent in operation and use only milliamps of power so can run constantly. They can be used to force air in or out.
  • 30 Sep 2019 08:15
    Reply # 7908858 on 4315719

    I'm pleased that you approve, David.  With the lazarette painted with shiny paint, there will be added reason for condensation to form.  I suspect it will still be an issue, but I don't think it will cause any problems, though I dare say it may form pools in one or two places.  However, while I am still flexible, I can reach just about every part of it to clean.

    I think the cockpit is working out as an good all-round design.  If i stay around NZ, I doubt I'll be out in much rough weather, but it is nice to keep the option and make the boat suitable for offshore conditions.  And one can always get caught out.

    As for the meths, while I can go into any village store and buy a litre, I don't want all the packaging.  I can take my 20l containers into Wynn Fraser and they will fill them with either meths or ethanol.  However, I don't want to be coming in and out of Whangarei every few weeks.  I actually will have 80 litres on board, but judging by past consumption, that will only last me for just over 6 months.  I must do a lot more cooking than you do!  But it will be nice to be independent of the city for months on end.




  • 30 Sep 2019 08:10
    Reply # 7908842 on 7907673
    Anonymous wrote:

     This  shows the port shelf with the locker for the meths containers also glued into place.  The latter appears to be at a crazy angle, but part of the idea is to make it easier for me to drag the full one towards me to swop for an empty one.  A 20litre container is quite a lot for me to manoeuvre around.

    So is that 40 litres of meths you'll be carrying? When I unloaded the empty containers at the end of my summer cruise, I was surprised to find that I'd only used 10 litres in four months. Even allowing for your greater enthusiasm for on-board cookery, that'll be enough to get you to Alaska, easily!


    Good place to stick some home brew.

  • 29 Sep 2019 12:05
    Reply # 7907673 on 4315719

     This  shows the port shelf with the locker for the meths containers also glued into place.  The latter appears to be at a crazy angle, but part of the idea is to make it easier for me to drag the full one towards me to swop for an empty one.  A 20litre container is quite a lot for me to manoeuvre around.

    So is that 40 litres of meths you'll be carrying? When I unloaded the empty containers at the end of my summer cruise, I was surprised to find that I'd only used 10 litres in four months. Even allowing for your greater enthusiasm for on-board cookery, that'll be enough to get you to Alaska, easily!

  • 29 Sep 2019 08:47
    Reply # 7907542 on 4315719

     It's funny how large it looks until someone is sitting there.  However, my offshore instincts kept kicking in whenever I thought about the foot well, so I've ended up with a roomy after deck with lots of places to sit, but with a small well from which to steer.

    This is going to be an amazingly good cockpit for sailing in rough weather, when the water is coming at you horizontally, as well as in mild conditions and at anchor, when you want more all-round visibility. I like it.

  • 29 Sep 2019 08:37
    Reply # 7907541 on 4315719

     I've given a certain amount of thought to additional ventilation in the boat.  While the Air-only dorade that I fitted should be adequate most of the time, I am concerned that in winter, with the boat shut up against wind and rain and the fire lit, there won't be sufficient air coming into the boat.  I have added a sort of dorade arrangement within the deck box.  Under the locker top and well inboard, it would take a catastrophe for water to enter - and I would probably have more to worry about than a few litres of water in the lazarette at that stage.  I used skin fittings - the pipe is very strong and glues into place with epoxy.  I just put them in temporarily for the moment, to make it easier to paint out the lockers.

    Very good. I always intended to do that on Tystie, to ventilate the lazarette and reduce the amount of condensation in winter, but never got a Round Tuit.

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