SibLim update

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  • 10 Feb 2019 15:36
    Reply # 7156360 on 4315719

    My Marco Polo/Teleport deck was painted with a one part polyurethane with a commercial, non-skid additive made from crushed walnut shells. It was easy on bare feet.

    The coach roof was almost full width with curved corners. Little camber. The longitudinal deck beams, about 2-1/2" x 2" (?) were on top of the deck, not inside. Glassed over and painted with non-skid as well. They provided excellent toe holds.

  • 10 Feb 2019 02:54
    Reply # 7155871 on 7149492
    David Thatcher wrote:

    Up to the new owner now. 

    So Mark, bullied, browbeat and bribed you to sell in the end, David.  Well, at least this lovely boat will still be based in NZ.

    Beautiful interior on the new build. keep working Annie, the decade is almost over!

    Fortunately, strictly speaking, the new decade starts in 2021!  Phew!
  • 10 Feb 2019 02:46
    Reply # 7155869 on 7149014
    Graham wrote:

    Nobody (or nothing) is perfect.  Though Siblim comes close.

    You are too kind.  She is a long way from perfect, I know that, but I hope she will be ideal for me :-)
  • 09 Feb 2019 00:02
    Reply # 7154564 on 7149492
    David Thatcher wrote:

    If you have a lot of camber on the deck you do need a good non-skid coating if traversing the deck area when the boat is upright. We have quite a steep camber on the deck of 'Footprints' with a non-skid paint which is a  bit worn down, so I do feel a bit 'could slip' if going forward in wet conditions.

    I remember when a friend of mine launched his new Schionning cat, which has very rounded deck edges.  He was standing on the bow as the boat came alongside the dock.  The deck was wet because he had been washing off the grit from the launching.  His wife suddenly put the engines hard astern and the boat jerked to a standstill.  He slid gracefully into the water, thereby discovering that his non-skid paint, while it looked very smart, wasn't very effective.  I had a heavily-cambered flush deck on my last boat, Mudshark, and used cork and epoxy to make an effective non-skid surface.  But it was like sandpaper, and just as effective in taking off skin.  Then I coated it with a couple of coats of a rubber-based paint, Emmerclad, which made it more comfortable.  It was a sod to clean, though.  Bare teak decks are nice in cool climates, but too hot for me in the tropics.  These days I use a commercial deck paint and add extra non-skid granules.  It is still a sod to clean, but luckily I am not fastidious.
    Last modified: 09 Feb 2019 00:04 | Anonymous member
  • 07 Feb 2019 08:28
    Reply # 7151425 on 7143115
    Anonymous wrote:

    I've finally brought my  blog up to date.  You will probably be as relieved as I am to know that the interior is just about completed.


    Looking good!
  • 07 Feb 2019 08:22
    Reply # 7151409 on 7146134
    Anonymous wrote:whenever I type, it ignores the space bar, which drives me mad!)


     
    Yes, I've noticed that too. Seems better today though :-)
  • 06 Feb 2019 07:21
    Reply # 7149492 on 7143534
    David Tyler wrote:

    " I find people's attitude to the camber a bit of a puzzle.  When the boat is heeling, you can walk on the weather deck and have a pretty level area to move along.  When the boat is upright, you can walk along the centre line (sail permitting).  I don't see the issue myself, but the camber draws a lot of negative comment."


    If you have a lot of camber on the deck you do need a good non-skid coating if traversing the deck area when the boat is upright. We have quite a steep camber on the deck of 'Footprints' with a non-skid paint which is a  bit worn down, so I do feel a bit 'could slip' if going forward in wet conditions. Annie's teak decking will solve this problem. The advantage of the steep camber is that the profile of the boat can be kept low but there is still adequate headroom inside. I have been meaning to redo the non-skid ever since we bought 'Footprints', but have never done so. Up to the new owner now. 

    Beautiful interior on the new build. keep working Annie, the decade is almost over!


    Last modified: 06 Feb 2019 07:22 | Anonymous member
  • 05 Feb 2019 23:41
    Reply # 7149014 on 4315719

    The interior looks wonderful, Annie.  You will reap the reward for your patience over many delightful years aboard.  The only time I have found traversing cambered decks interesting is when the boat is rolling heavily downwind.  However, what the critics are forgetting is that you don't need to work on deck much with a junk!  I almost never leave the cockpit at sea these days.  When you do go forward, to anchor, look at the dolphins, or whatever, the answer, as you say, is to stick to the centreline.  If the boat has a steady heel, the windward deck is a delightful place to lounge.  Nitpicking is a biological imperative carried deep within our ape genes.  As the concluding line of Some Like it Hot says, Nobody (or nothing) is perfect.  Though Siblim comes close.

    Last modified: 05 Feb 2019 23:42 | Anonymous member
  • 05 Feb 2019 20:39
    Reply # 7148701 on 7146383
    David wrote:

    Is the cabin sole to be left untreated? Does tigerwood keep its looks when left exposed?


    Yes, it will be left untreated.  I expect the tigerwood will end up losing a lot of its contrast once the light gets to it.  On the other hand, foot traffic might keep it 'sanded'.  Either way, I get a very attractive, non-slip cabin sole.

    (off topic:Len's suggestion works!)

  • 04 Feb 2019 21:00
    Reply # 7146383 on 4315719

    "Making the cabin sole is definitely one of the 'lolly jobs' and I am so pleased with the end result.  The tigerwood sands to a beautifully, satiny finish that feels lovely under one's bare feet."

    Is the cabin sole to be left untreated? Does tigerwood keep its looks when left exposed?

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