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  • 17 Jun 2019 10:27
    Reply # 7583401 on 4315719

    The finish work is looking really good. Very nice!

  • 13 Jun 2019 16:03
    Reply # 7577621 on 7576542
    David Thatcher wrote: If a picture is worth a thousand words then a well shot video is worth a thousand pictures. 
    Funny you should say that... at 25 frames/second, 40 seconds is already 1000 pictures.  ;)
  • 13 Jun 2019 10:08
    Reply # 7577035 on 4315719

    Outstanding!

    What a fantastic piece of work!

    Malcolm 

  • 13 Jun 2019 01:37
    Reply # 7576542 on 7573869
    Annie Hill wrote:

    Funny you should say that, Len.  I thought it was a very odd idea to take a video of something as static as a boat in build, but each to his own.  I suppose you can pause it if you want to look at something a bit longer?  I'm not sure what the video shows that I haven't put on my blog?
    A video of a static object has the potential to be about as much fun as watching paint dry. But as stated by others, a video can bring 3 dimensions to something which a photograph cannot. And it also introduces the personalities behind the object, in this case a very interesting and well executed boat build with a colourful personality executing the project . If a picture is worth a thousand words then a well shot video is worth a thousand pictures. 
    Last modified: 13 Jun 2019 07:50 | Anonymous member
  • 12 Jun 2019 17:01
    Reply # 7574461 on 7573869
    Annie Hill wrote:
    Len wrote:Wow! I had not thought a video could be that much different than stills. But this video shows what has been missing in the blog for sure. I think sailor turned master boat builder, Annie, had better keep her feet wet or she may be too busy building boats to ever sail again.  ;)   Very pretty.
    Funny you should say that, Len.  I thought it was a very odd idea to take a video of something as static as a boat in build, but each to his own.  I suppose you can pause it if you want to look at something a bit longer?  I'm not sure what the video shows that I haven't put on my blog?
    It doesn't show any one thing that the pictures don't show for show, but it does join them together into a full 3D space. It  shows how the pieces fit together... and a moving camera shows off the shiny surfaces in a way that a still just can't. Having "port" lights on the port side and not starboard was a nice touch too :) Remember, you see it in video all the time (stereo video yet), a still brings back your memory of the live thing and that is different from trying to piece together that picture from stills.
  • 12 Jun 2019 09:04
    Reply # 7573869 on 7569252
    Len wrote:Wow! I had not thought a video could be that much different than stills. But this video shows what has been missing in the blog for sure. I think sailor turned master boat builder, Annie, had better keep her feet wet or she may be too busy building boats to ever sail again.  ;)   Very pretty.
    Funny you should say that, Len.  I thought it was a very odd idea to take a video of something as static as a boat in build, but each to his own.  I suppose you can pause it if you want to look at something a bit longer?  I'm not sure what the video shows that I haven't put on my blog?
  • 10 Jun 2019 03:43
    Reply # 7569252 on 7568891
    Annie Hill wrote:

    Oops, sorry, I forgot to mention that I'd blogged.

    For those who enjoy videos, Rob Lovelace took one recently:


    Wow! I had not thought a video could be that much different than stills. But this video shows what has been missing in the blog for sure. I think sailor turned master boat builder, Annie, had better keep her feet wet or she may be too busy building boats to ever sail again.  ;)   Very pretty.
  • 10 Jun 2019 00:33
    Reply # 7568961 on 7568891
    Anonymous wrote:

    Oops, sorry, I forgot to mention that I'd blogged.

    For those who enjoy videos, Rob Lovelace took one recently: I hadn't realised that he was, assuming he was taking some stills, and I was even more stunned to hear that it was out 'on public release'.  Probably just as well I didn't know because I get horribly self conscious when people start filming me.

    Anyway, Rob deserves to be much better known and is an amazing sailor.  He decided he'd fancy trying this boating lark several years ago and bought a little Aussie boat, a Top Hat 25, thinking it might be nice to sail to Indonesia. He then proceeded to sail anti-clockwise around Australia.  He told me that for a one-week period, coming down the W coast, I think it was, he couldn't even brew a cup of coffee!  This is probably the reason why he is now sailing a Westsail 28.  To be honest, I hadn't heard of these boats before, but it's a small (and it has to be said, less tubby) sister of the much better-known Westsail 32.  Last year he sailed Sans Pareil to Tasmania, and while a very well-known sailor and writer was waiting for a 'weather window' aboard a 40ft, steel yacht, Rob had visited Port Davey, gone up Mt Aubrey and miles along a tramping track in his jandals (flip flops) and turned the corner to explore Tasmania's west coast, which he thought was quite wonderful.  From Tasmania he sailed to Nelson and thence to Whangarei, where I met him.  He is quiet, down-to-earth and insists that he is just a novice sailor. 

    To be honest, I was so surprised at him that I quite forgot to get his email address.  However, he does these videos regularly, I'm told, so I can follow him this way and the good news is that he's coming back to NZ next year.  After which he's heading for Indonesia.  He says.




    Here is his youtube channel link: 

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3X_8u61NpMgZsYg9ztEEaQ


  • 09 Jun 2019 22:49
    Reply # 7568891 on 4315719

    Oops, sorry, I forgot to mention that I'd blogged.

    For those who enjoy videos, Rob Lovelace took one recently: I hadn't realised that he was, assuming he was taking some stills, and I was even more stunned to hear that it was out 'on public release'.  Probably just as well I didn't know because I get horribly self conscious when people start filming me.

    Anyway, Rob deserves to be much better known and is an amazing sailor.  He decided he'd fancy trying this boating lark several years ago and bought a little Aussie boat, a Top Hat 25, thinking it might be nice to sail to Indonesia. He then proceeded to sail anti-clockwise around Australia.  He told me that for a one-week period, coming down the W coast, I think it was, he couldn't even brew a cup of coffee!  This is probably the reason why he is now sailing a Westsail 28.  To be honest, I hadn't heard of these boats before, but it's a small (and it has to be said, less tubby) sister of the much better-known Westsail 32.  Last year he sailed Sans Pareil to Tasmania, and while a very well-known sailor and writer was waiting for a 'weather window' aboard a 40ft, steel yacht, Rob had visited Port Davey, gone up Mt Aubrey and miles along a tramping track in his jandals (flip flops) and turned the corner to explore Tasmania's west coast, which he thought was quite wonderful.  From Tasmania he sailed to Nelson and thence to Whangarei, where I met him.  He is quiet, down-to-earth and insists that he is just a novice sailor. 

    To be honest, I was so surprised at him that I quite forgot to get his email address.  However, he does these videos regularly, I'm told, so I can follow him this way and the good news is that he's coming back to NZ next year.  After which he's heading for Indonesia.  He says.


  • 09 Jun 2019 20:07
    Reply # 7568572 on 4315719

    Annie has posted another update here

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