SibLim update

  • 31 May 2020 21:53
    Reply # 9005483 on 9005051
    Rudolf wrote:

    David Thatcher:

    the rudder I put lashings on a vandeStadt Oceaan 22 has no skeg, is balanced and 70 cm deep. Works very well, no problems.

    Rudolf

    That is encouraging. Good I think to replace heavy metal fittings with lighter weight lashings or composites. Although my little catamaran will not be junk rig I like the DIY nature of the junk rig and on the camber panel junk sail David Tyler helped me build for my previous yacht just about everything on the rig was done with lashings rather than metal fittings. It was great to throw away the kilos heavy yard sling fitting and replace it with a simple lashing. My little catamaran will have a high aspect ratio gaff rig and everything will be done with lashings.
  • 31 May 2020 17:52
    Reply # 9005051 on 4315719

    David Thatcher:

    the rudder I put lashings on a vandeStadt Oceaan 22 has no skeg, is balanced and 70 cm deep. Works very well, no problems.

    Rudolf

  • 31 May 2020 07:11
    Reply # 9004187 on 9003979
    Annie wrote:

    David: If you remember Norsand, it is by no means the ideal venue for a Launching Ceremony. Fanshi will be unceremoniously shoved down the slipway; Kevin will pause while I christen her and then she will be pushed down further until she floats free. There will be a strong expectation that I then move her out of the way and free up the slipway for other boats. In truth, I will be far too nervous to make a big deal out of it. And I suspect I will only have a few days’ notice of the date. I think we would both enjoy it a lot more if you were to fly out after the launching and help me learn to sail the boat for a week or so.

    Yes, that's what I'm thinking, that I should come after the launch, but it will still need some planning ahead. The first thing that has to happen is that NZ has to open its borders to foreigners again, and preferably not insist on 14 days quarantine. The second is that airlines have to begin to accept long haul passengers on something like reasonable Ts and Cs.

    I still think it would be a shame if those junkies already in NZ couldn't come and throw their hats in the air, give Fanshi three resounding cheers and congratulate you on a massive achievement. I quite understand if you don't want the world's press and TV to cover the event, though ;-)

  • 31 May 2020 04:24
    Reply # 9004071 on 9003979
    Annie Hill wrote:

    Rudolf: thank you for your encouragement. I have to say that I’m surprised the rudder lashings are not more generally used, but I suppose with production boats that it’s quicker to use metal fittings.


    I have been thinking for quite a while of using the Wharram style rudder lashings on my little catamaran. For simplicity, lower cost, and weight saving. I have noticed in my research though that all of the rudders using this system have support the whole height of the rudder and are generally mounted on a skeg allowing a lashing near the bottom of the rudder blade. My rudder blades will be cantilevered below the blade housings, they raise and lower,  the rudder boxes being transom mounted. So I am not sure whether lashings on the blade housings will be strong enough to support the cantilevered blades. The blades themselves are tiny having a width of only 220 mm, and extending 700 mm below the water. So perhaps there is only one way to find out if the lashing system will work.

    It is great though that Annie has used this system. I don't imagine there are many monohulls using the lashings.

    Really great to see Annie getting very close to the end. Looking very likely that she will be afloat by the end of the decade


    Last modified: 31 May 2020 06:22 | Anonymous member
  • 31 May 2020 02:31
    Reply # 9003979 on 4315719

    David: If you remember Norsand, it is by no means the ideal venue for a Launching Ceremony. Fanshi will be unceremoniously shoved down the slipway; Kevin will pause while I christen her and then she will be pushed down further until she floats free. There will be a strong expectation that I then move her out of the way and free up the slipway for other boats. In truth, I will be far too nervous to make a big deal out of it. And I suspect I will only have a few days’ notice of the date. I think we would both enjoy it a lot more if you were to fly out after the launching and help me learn to sail the boat for a week or so.

    Rudolf: thank you for your encouragement. I have to say that I’m surprised the rudder lashings are not more generally used, but I suppose with production boats that it’s quicker to use metal fittings.

    The rubbing strakes look OK so far. Time alone will tell ...

  • 28 May 2020 19:56
    Reply # 8998705 on 4315719

    Decision, decisions, Annie. these last bits and pieces are what meets the eye, exiting times.. I would have done the same with the rudders paint scheme. Rudder lashings are great in use, nothing there to keep them from turning, and very strong.  

    You are almost there , great work!

    Rudolf

  • 28 May 2020 09:30
    Reply # 8997280 on 4315719

    As the saying goes, 'what's not to like?'

    Nothing, nothing at all. Those rudders look darned good in the photos.

    However, it does show the fact that The End Is In Sight!! 

    It is indeed! Well done!

    [... thinks ... when should I start to look for a flight from Manchester to Auckland?]

  • 27 May 2020 23:16
    Reply # 8996450 on 4315719

    Another instalment of the epic is now posted.  www.anniehill.blogspot.com

  • 13 May 2020 08:19
    Reply # 8965336 on 4315719
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    I frequently pat my shoulder for having been wise enough to avoid building any boat bigger than a canoe. Below is a warning I wrote in Chapter 2 of The Cambered Panel Junk Rig. Note the importance of also avoiding tearing out a lot of interior. For each hour spent on tearing out stuff, you may need 100 hours on rebuilding.

     

    ****************************************

    “Buying or building

    Unless we are talking about small boats below one ton displacement, I would strongly warn against starting a home-building project, that is; unless you are well under 30 and not married. I have seen too many stranded projects. Still, some of the DIY designs are next to irresistible. In many cases they would be a very easy match for a professional boat-builder who could nail up an affordable boat for you (to paint and rig yourself). That option is worth considering.

     

    Generally, I suggest you go hunting on the second-hand market for a suitable boat which you can re-rig. Unless you have very special needs, there are lots of boats to choose from. The fine thing with production boats is that quite often, you may get to test-sail the boat with the original rig, or at least you may read some test report about it in a boat magazine or on the web. When hunting for a suitable vessel, keep in mind that you need a place for the new JR mast(s). If the new mast position means you have to re-build a section of the interior, the domino-effect may take over: Before you know it, you have torn out most of the interior and suddenly have a much bigger project in front of you. Be smart, be lazy; the re-rigging job is quite a project in itself. Personally I find it easier to adapt to a non-perfect boat than to define and create the perfect one. I don’t envy the perfectionists...” 

    ****************************************

     

    Even just onverting to JR is quite a job, unless the mast is already in place. Making the sail is the easiest part, and even enjoyable...

     

    Arne

    PS: Annie's great work is the exception which confirms my rule...

     

     

     

     


    Last modified: 13 May 2020 08:21 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 13 May 2020 07:51
    Reply # 8965300 on 4315719

    My main point is that when a project - any project - drags on and on, taking much longer than the original time plan, however long that was to be, then it's much more likely to be overtaken by Events, on a global, local or personal scale. The goalposts are very much more likely to be moved, the longer a project lasts, and there's no arguing with that. Current example: we are into a global pandemic, and everything is up in the air for everyone. When the dust settles, it's not clear to anyone what the "new normal" is going to be like. So imagine, for example, building a very large voyaging boat over a long time scale, only to find that voyaging widely will now become so onerous that it no longer seems like the excellent way to spend one's life that it did a decade ago.

    So no, Annie, I'm going to stick with the advice to be brutally honest with oneself about what can be reasonably attempted, with the available resources of all kinds - time, money, skills, energy, strength, materials, space - within the time span of two years. That applies just as much to fitting out a bare hull, refitting accommodation or simply converting to JR as it does to a complete new build. If that means only a small simple boat, not a large complex one, then so be it. The journey is more likely to remain as enjoyable as the initial dream promised that it was going to be. and, of course, the journey is more likely to end at the planned destination. 

    Last modified: 13 May 2020 10:51 | Anonymous member
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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