SibLim update

  • 26 Jan 2020 19:11
    Reply # 8688617 on 4315719

    Looking very beautiful Annie. I like the yellow in the cockpit. It has warmth and interest. There is far too much white used on boats these days.

  • 26 Jan 2020 08:10
    Reply # 8684520 on 4315719

    Well, that's brightened up a dark, cold winter morning! That cockpit really is a sight to gladden the heart. I can just imagine the drool-worthy articles that are going to appear in the boating comics.

    "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
    Its loveliness increases; it will never
    Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
    A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
    Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing."

    While I'm in at least guernsey, gloves and woolly hat on good winter days, more on bad days, it's good to see Annie in summer dress and barefoot to remind me that Spring will come, things are going to get better.

    Wasn't there going to be a short stern deck, or is this yet to come? Something needs to make the stern rigid sideways, under sheeting loads. At least some lodging knees in the corners.

    What diameter is the pramhood/bubble aperture?

    Last modified: 26 Jan 2020 09:40 | Anonymous member
  • 26 Jan 2020 06:03
    Reply # 8683843 on 8683224
    Anonymous wrote:

    Finally, I have made time to update my blog.  Lots of pictures for those who like photos!   


    Oh yeah, pictures are nice. You must be a master photographer too, the boat house some how comes out looking like a cathedral...

    BTW, to quote Jerry Rosa who fixes some badly damaged guitars... "It's going to look a lot worse before it looks better". For those times you don't want to take pictures before it's done. How it looks when it's finished is all what matters.

  • 26 Jan 2020 04:19
    Reply # 8683224 on 4315719

    Finally, I have made time to update my blog.  Lots of pictures for those who like photos!   

  • 25 Jan 2020 23:42
    Reply # 8681690 on 8641683
    David wrote:

    Annie has quite enough to do, if Fanshi is to be sailing this year. I offered to make a set of battens, from the 38mm GRP tube that I can get in the UK (there doesn't seem to be a source of equivalent quality in NZ) and Annie has kindly permitted me to do so.

    'kindly permitted me to do so', doesn't begin to describle how I accepted David's offer with cries of delight. While my bamboos are still quietly drying out gently in the shed, i have to say that the combination of a hinged batten and a little camber seems a much more attractive idea to me.  Time, of course, will tell ...
  • 21 Jan 2020 16:29
    Reply # 8641683 on 4315719

    Annie has quite enough to do, if Fanshi is to be sailing this year. I offered to make a set of battens, from the 38mm GRP tube that I can get in the UK (there doesn't seem to be a source of equivalent quality in NZ) and Annie has kindly permitted me to do so.

    The sail is to have hinged battens, with the panels cambered forward of the hinge and flat aft of the hinge. Both Annie and I are in favour of a sail that is flat in its after half, believing it to be better behaved than fully cambered panels, so all the camber is to be formed in the forward part of each panel.

    The batten tubes need reinforcing in way of the hinges, to resist the tendency to burst the tubes. I have done this by first laying up a length of Kevlar tubular braid, then putting on a binding, or whipping,  of glass roving, then turning the Kevlar braid back over the glass to enclose it, wetting it out, and winding a length of peel-ply tape tightly over the layup until it is cured. Annie will probably wish to fill and fair these reinforcements, then paint the whole tubes, to keep the UV at bay.

    The hinges are turned from 30mm dia nylon 66 bar, glass filled. Both tubes and hinges are cross-drilled at 5.5mm dia, using a bench drill, V block and vice to get the holes central. The holes in the hinges are then opened up with a tapered hand reamer, so that the centre of the hole is still 5.5mm dia, but when assembled, the tubes can take up an angle of 10˚ in the vertical direction as well as 12˚ in the horizontal.

    My experience on Tystie was that the battens will tend to misbehave if only permitted to articulate in the horizontal plane; and my experience on Weaverbird has been that though the upper hinges are under compression, and the lower hinges are neither in compression nor tension, when on the wind, all the hinges are tending to pull apart when on a run in brisk conditions. It is difficult to get fore and aft lashings tight enough to resist this, so I have gone back to the bolted hinges that I used on Tystie's battens, but with this extra degree of freedom.

    As a bonus, having the battens hinged will make it a lot easier to ship the bundle of finished battens from the UK down under to NZ.

    4 files
    Last modified: 22 Jan 2020 08:47 | Anonymous member
  • 15 Dec 2019 19:57
    Reply # 8287716 on 8284425
    Rudolf wrote:

    Great job, Annie. You've got my respect.

    Rudolf

    I take that very much as a compliment, having seen photos of your lovely schouw!
  • 15 Dec 2019 19:38
    Reply # 8287599 on 8283125
    David wrote:

    The cockpit looks Absolutely Fabulous!

    Well, someone had to say it. 

    Why thank you, kind sir.  I couldn't resist the teak backrests; however far more to the point is that at least as a place for people to gather, it works.  Until the engine is hanging there, the rudders fitted and I'm sitting at the helm, I won't be able to tell you whether the rest works - but I'm hopeful. At anchor, I spend a lot of time in the cockpit, so I'm pleased that it is going to be a success for that.  I want to have a Lakatao-style shade-cloth canopy over part of it, but I shall have to do it slightly differently, because the whole boat is so much smaller.
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  • 15 Dec 2019 19:10
    Reply # 8287404 on 8284670
    Anonymous wrote:

    TibVim update : Teak is beautiful, Varnish is marvellous !

    :-D Thank you so much

  • 15 Dec 2019 12:29
    Reply # 8284670 on 4315719

    TibVim update : Teak is beautiful, Varnish is marvellous !

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