HFJY34

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 05 Oct 2021 23:06
    Reply # 11143113 on 7155071
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Don't forget the 2-pot polyurethane (PU) paint.

    I’ve found 2-pot polyurethane paint or varnish to be very good. It appears to stick to anything from old topcoat, bare grp, glass-in-epoxy, and bare wood, and even bare aluminium.
    I painted the deck and topsides on Malena (1990-91) and the hull stayed clean and shiny without the normal need for scrubbing and polishing. The paint crept into any crack or void  -  I actually painted  the deck of Malena watertight.

    The second (wooden) mast of Malena was first covered in West epoxy and then given 6--7(?) coats of West’s own polyurethane, clear varnish. After about 13-14 years, one could see that the sunny side of the mast was starting to delaminate. I think the varnish was still ok, but it had let through enough UV rays to kill the epoxy.
    Therefore, when finishing Johanna’s mast after the same glass-epoxy sheathing, I used a white paint version of  2-pot PU-paint (not from West).
    Broremann’s wooden mast and the wooden top mast sections of Frøken Sørensen and Ingeborg were painted in either clear or white 2-pot PU, with no glass or epoxy involved (except in the metal-wood joints). Ingeborg first got five coats of clear varnish and then three coats of white. Upon inspection of the top mast this summer, I found this coating (5 years old) to be like new.

    An experiment: We found a piece of plywood and glassed half of a strip of glass tape to it, using PU paint as resin. The paint sucked in and bonded perfectly well to the plywood.
    Conclusion: If I ever am to do a small glass sheathing job, I will use PU as resin. It sticks like glue (it is glue), it is tough without getting brittle, and it resists UV very well.

    Arne


    Last modified: 06 Oct 2021 10:52 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 05 Oct 2021 20:20
    Reply # 11142693 on 7155071

    From what I’ve gathered, it’s a bad idea to mix epoxy and polyester in the same laminate. 

    It’s “either or”.

    I’m painting these days and sigma epoxy paints make the polyester job pleasant one in retrospect. 

    Last modified: 05 Oct 2021 20:23 | Anonymous member
  • 03 Oct 2021 15:13
    Reply # 11136967 on 11136658
    Anonymous wrote:

    Yes, some interesting thoughts there re epoxy/polyester. I have to say that I had some doubts about the polyester-based cladding of the hull, but now I understand that it's a solid outer shell on the hull, I'm pretty impressed with the system! Also, the way Frederik's done it, with the bronze nails giving a thorough mechanical bond to the ply is rock solid!

    On the other hand, in a 60 year old FG power boat with 50mm plywood transom, there has been no delamination even though the plywood has been wet. So there is a way of doing things that does work. I have read that the way to do things is to do at least one coat on the plywood with no hardener. Perhaps even thinned a bit for penetration. Of course, I think in the 60s, the resin was used without hardener and the mold was heated to cure the resin. However, there are parts of the boat where it does not seem the FG (frp?) could have been done in the mold, like the rear deck, that are also fg on plywood and these have no delamination either.

    I would point out that the stories of delamination I have seen floating around have for the most part, been DIY projects. I would guess that part of the problem has also been too few workers trying to clad too large a surface with rapidly hardening resin that has no way of penetrating the plywood before it is already hard. Contrast this to commercial production where the hardener is added as part of the spray system just in time for it to come out of the nozzle (see the youtube channel "on the hulls" for some explanation of spraying resin on to the mold). Epoxy with slow hardener is probably easier for the DYI project with limited equipment and people, if more expensive but frp, done right, is not out of the question.


  • 03 Oct 2021 10:33
    Reply # 11136658 on 7155071

    Thanks Jan :-)

    Yes, some interesting thoughts there re epoxy/polyester. I have to say that I had some doubts about the polyester-based cladding of the hull, but now I understand that it's a solid outer shell on the hull, I'm pretty impressed with the system! Also, the way Frederik's done it, with the bronze nails giving a thorough mechanical bond to the ply is rock solid!

    I'm sure the bronze nails weren't cheap, but then again, epoxy isn't either and using polyester resin for the glasswork should more than compensate the cost of the nails, I think..

  • 01 Oct 2021 18:07
    Reply # 11133453 on 11132291
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    Last weekend, I visited Frederik and, with his kind permission, shot a bit of video footage of his boat build. The trip to Denmark, the footage of Frederik's boat and some more footage of my daughter's junk rigged "Alanouwoly" can be seen here (along with some short clips of my boat in its current state of build).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbJMe1htNwo


    And now again, at the end of September, we visited again and shot a bit more footage of Frederik's progress. The hull is glassed and faired, and the boat is pretty much ready for paint and the big roll over. Looking good!


    The footage can be seen towards the end of this video, which also shows the current state of progress on my build...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbjrPyKhJqk

    Our thanks to Frederik for his hospitality, and to Denmark generally for being such a beautiful place to visit :-)

    Thanks for making those videos of the Hogfish project Tony, that is one confidence inspiring strong hull!  With all due respect to Frederik for following Chris Morejohn's methods I'd be interested to hear what anyone else would think of using one coat of epoxy as an interface between the ply and the first layer of polyester/glass, those nails must have cost a fortune. As far as I know epoxy sticks to grp, and it definitely sticks to plywood. Well done Frederik, I think the hull looks fairer than you're giving yourself credit for, should paint up really well.. 
  • 01 Oct 2021 08:30
    Reply # 11132291 on 10590278
    Anonymous wrote:

    Last weekend, I visited Frederik and, with his kind permission, shot a bit of video footage of his boat build. The trip to Denmark, the footage of Frederik's boat and some more footage of my daughter's junk rigged "Alanouwoly" can be seen here (along with some short clips of my boat in its current state of build).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbJMe1htNwo


    And now again, at the end of September, we visited again and shot a bit more footage of Frederik's progress. The hull is glassed and faired, and the boat is pretty much ready for paint and the big roll over. Looking good!


    The footage can be seen towards the end of this video, which also shows the current state of progress on my build...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbjrPyKhJqk

    Our thanks to Frederik for his hospitality, and to Denmark generally for being such a beautiful place to visit :-)

  • 27 Jul 2021 19:36
    Reply # 10778025 on 7155071

    Done with fiberglassing for now. 

    On to putty and  bit of fairing.

    first layer of 1,5 oz matt fastened with 9500 silicon bronze ring shank nails

    followed by 2 more layers of matt and a final layer of 10 oz cloth. 

    All laid up with polyester raisin of course..

    5 files
  • 04 Jun 2021 20:20
    Reply # 10592212 on 7155071

    Thanks Tony. Nice work & good to have you over. 

    Need lead, anyone..?

  • 04 Jun 2021 08:17
    Reply # 10590278 on 7155071

    Last weekend, I visited Frederik and, with his kind permission, shot a bit of video footage of his boat build. The trip to Denmark, the footage of Frederik's boat and some more footage of my daughter's junk rigged "Alanouwoly" can be seen here (along with some short clips of my boat in its current state of build).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbJMe1htNwo

    Last modified: 04 Jun 2021 11:12 | Anonymous member
  • 04 May 2021 20:39
    Reply # 10441895 on 10439586
    Anonymous wrote:

    And please, don't allow anyone to persuade you to launch before the boat is finished.  I can't remember how many times I have heard people say " a boat is never finished".

    This made me think. First I am thinking of launching before finishing in my case but my case is different. I have a boat that lives on a trailer and will never live on it (22foot). This year it will go in the water with no mast but with three bunks and a cooker so we can go camping. We have in the past filled our 16foot boat with camping gear and set up camp on a nearby island. This year we hope to not have to set up as much. after two weeks it is back on the trailer in the back yard for step two.

    However, for a home, finish first then launch will: give reason to keep working  and pushing to get finished. Allow work to continue without having to clean up for lunch, supper and sleeping. Finishing in the water means moving house to one end of the boat to work on the other and then moving house again when finished... maybe more than twice the work. So choose the yard wisely and finish before launch. Working on a boat you are also living in or even a boat that is on the water will be one big delay and merely add more truth to the "a boat is never finished" saying.

    This boat is a try out for my family, mostly my wife. We will find out if  we will continue to camp in a small boat for a few weeks in the summer, go back to land camping or go for a bigger boat for longer trips.


<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software