Redwing

  • 21 Mar 2019 02:35
    Reply # 7237320 on 644008

    After much struggle I've come to the conclusion V90 thread is a bit overkill for my poor Husqvarna. Anyway apart from the loops for the ties the sail cover is done. I bought a sewing awl a while back so maybe I'll use it to sew the loops for the ties on...a nice meditaion. :)

  • 20 Mar 2019 04:37
    Reply # 7235701 on 644008

    Working on the sail cover now and I have to say I’m getting a bit over sewing.

  • 17 Mar 2019 05:59
    Reply # 7228073 on 644008

    I used webbing batten parrels on Footprints with great success. I used 50mm wide webbing which was pulled quite tight. As of when I sold Footprints these parrels had done 7 years of service, many miles, coastal and ocean, and with no problems at all. I sewed loops in the ends of the webbing, one loop secured to the forward end of the batten, the other end of the webbing attached to the batten with a light lashing which passed around the batten and was prevented from moving forward with two plastic 'pegs' screwed to the batten wall. There is a photo on my profile photo album, new sail. It should be noted that Footprints had very long batten parrels to allow for moving the sail fore and aft on the mast.

    I should be able to copy that photo here? 

  • 16 Mar 2019 23:13
    Reply # 7227836 on 7227295
    Anonymous wrote:

    Graham,

    How does that work, tying the seatbelt webbing with a constrictor knot? The knot is in the webbing itself? Or is a piece of somewhat light line tied in a constrictor knot to lash the webbing to the batten?

    On AUKLET, batten parrels are 1/4 inch braided line with spiral plastic electrical wrap  around it – the loose stuff that is worked around the line and then slides freely. I'm not sure how much difference it makes, but it has not been a problem. The line is tied to the battens using double constrictor knots – a variation on a regular constrictor. Gorilla tape is wrapped two layers thick around the batten itself, and has been working well as a stop.

    Shemaya


    Hi Shemaya,  I have just tied the constrictor knot in the webbing itself.  Because the 50mm webbing gives significant surface contact with the alloy batten, it seems to be ok, though it is also tied just behind the fendering.  A double constrictor knot would have to be even better.  I did not want to drill holes in the alloy battens.  Though they don't flex much, I was worried about weakening the batten.  Alloy is notorious for cracking around holes if it has any flex in it, hence the advice not to put holes above the partners in an alloy mast.
  • 16 Mar 2019 13:34
    Reply # 7227295 on 644008

    Graham,

    How does that work, tying the seatbelt webbing with a constrictor knot? The knot is in the webbing itself? Or is a piece of somewhat light line tied in a constrictor knot to lash the webbing to the batten?

    On AUKLET, batten parrels are 1/4 inch braided line with spiral plastic electrical wrap  around it – the loose stuff that is worked around the line and then slides freely. I'm not sure how much difference it makes, but it has not been a problem. The line is tied to the battens using double constrictor knots – a variation on a regular constrictor. Gorilla tape is wrapped two layers thick around the batten itself, and has been working well as a stop.

    Shemaya

  • 16 Mar 2019 10:32
    Reply # 7227187 on 644008

    I tie the aft end of my batten parrels to the battens with something called a constrictor knot.  It is illustrated on page 21 of JRA magazine #77 - June 2018.  It is attached just aft of the batten fendering, which in itself will hinder the knot sliding forwards, but the knot is also very good at holding on its own.  I use 50mm black seatbelt webbing and have no issues with friction.  I did try rope with black rubber hose over, but not only did they bind, the hose left black marks on the mast.  I find the seatbelt webbing quite slippery.

  • 14 Mar 2019 23:35
    Reply # 7224731 on 7222527
    Anonymous wrote:
    Gary wrote:

    Okay a saddle but a loop around the batten. I’ve been using 50mm webbing parcels but I feel these have caused a bit too much friction. So I’m thinking 6mm braid inside 12mm low pressure black poly pipe.

    Gary, I used 25mm webbing that was quite flexible and found that worked well.  I don't recommend the lengths of pipe: they will snag together in ways that defy comprehension!
    Thanks Annie I just happen to have a roll of 25mm webbing. :)
  • 14 Mar 2019 19:57
    Reply # 7222527 on 7218281
    Gary wrote:

    Okay a saddle but a loop around the batten. I’ve been using 50mm webbing parcels but I feel these have caused a bit too much friction. So I’m thinking 6mm braid inside 12mm low pressure black poly pipe.

    Gary, I used 25mm webbing that was quite flexible and found that worked well.  I don't recommend the lengths of pipe: they will snag together in ways that defy comprehension!
  • 14 Mar 2019 06:51
    Reply # 7218281 on 644008

    Okay a saddle but a loop around the batten. I’ve been using 50mm webbing parcels but I feel these have caused a bit too much friction. So I’m thinking 6mm braid inside 12mm low pressure black poly pipe.

  • 14 Mar 2019 05:43
    Reply # 7218236 on 644008

    Hi Gary,

    Paul is right, just burn a hole with a hot knife or soldering iron. Regarding the parrell itself I always take the line around the back of the batten from below, come out above and loop it back behind the batten from above to below. Then I splice the end to the standing part if laid rope , or knot it to the standing part with a bowline. I then put a stop in front of the rear loop to stop it sliding along the batten. This can be just by a screw or one of the saddles that you already have. My advice is do not rely on the saddle alone to hold the parrell, make sure the parrell is wrapped around the batten.

    All the best, David.

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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