Redwing

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  • 05 Sep 2019 12:06
    Reply # 7865054 on 7864880
    Anonymous wrote:

    A few memorable trips I have made.

    In 1974 in Dilkusha, a 19 foot Itchen Ferry Gaff Cutter, Pill harbour on the Bristol Avon to Barry harbour, South Wales, 33 miles in 3 hours and 5 minutes, with a Bristol Channel spring ebb tide under me!!

    In 1995 in Arcady, modified Bruce Roberts Offshore 38 I built in California. Tied up at the back of Ventura Harbour to tied up at the back of Wilmington harbour, 78 miles in eight and a half hours. Log read to 11.5 knots and was pegged solid for over two hours crossing Santa Monica Bay in a mild 18 to 20 knot Santa Ana wind. Some south going current with me.

    In   1997 in Arcady, Isthmus Harbour, Catalina Island, to Angels Gate, San Pedro Harbour, in one hour fifty five minutes, 22 miles. A 65 foot trawler yacht we were catching up to suddenly expelled a huge cloud of black diesel smoke and we could no longer catch her!!

    In 2012 in Arcadian, Marsden Cove to 25 miles north west of the Three Kings, close reaching in 15 to 18 knots of wind, 203 miles in 26 hours.

    The trip down the Tweed River with Gary was very enjoyable and getting the transom out of the water in the lighter breezes definitely improved her speed, but I am not sure it was a full knot Gary!!

    All the best, David


    I  stand corrected, I was under the impression it was ....may be combined with the half knot through lifting the outboard out of the water?:)
  • 05 Sep 2019 07:37
    Reply # 7864880 on 644008

    A few memorable trips I have made.

    In 1974 in Dilkusha, a 19 foot Itchen Ferry Gaff Cutter, Pill harbour on the Bristol Avon to Barry harbour, South Wales, 33 miles in 3 hours and 5 minutes, with a Bristol Channel spring ebb tide under me!!

    In 1995 in Arcady, modified Bruce Roberts Offshore 38 I built in California. Tied up at the back of Ventura Harbour to tied up at the back of Wilmington harbour, 78 miles in eight and a half hours. Log read to 11.5 knots and was pegged solid for over two hours crossing Santa Monica Bay in a mild 18 to 20 knot Santa Ana wind. Some south going current with me.

    In   1997 in Arcady, Isthmus Harbour, Catalina Island, to Angels Gate, San Pedro Harbour, in one hour fifty five minutes, 22 miles. A 65 foot trawler yacht we were catching up to suddenly expelled a huge cloud of black diesel smoke and we could no longer catch her!!

    In 2012 in Arcadian, Marsden Cove to 25 miles north west of the Three Kings, close reaching in 15 to 18 knots of wind, 203 miles in 26 hours.

    The trip down the Tweed River with Gary was very enjoyable and getting the transom out of the water in the lighter breezes definitely improved her speed, but I am not sure it was a full knot Gary!!

    All the best, David

    Last modified: 05 Sep 2019 07:40 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Sep 2019 23:48
    Reply # 7864307 on 644008

    7.2 on gps, I don't have a log on the boat. Redwing is 24' 6" LOD.21' 6" on the waterline. 

  • 04 Sep 2019 09:57
    Reply # 7863074 on 644008

    That's nothing.  

    We reached 10.86 knots (GPS) at the weekend on our, whisper it, Bermudan rig Wayfarer, on a flat lake in a +20 knots gust of wind. Very loud and quite scary :-)

    I've gone faster, but that was on a large car ferry. :- (

    I don't know how the top dinghy sailors do that, and more, in 5 foot waves and stay upright while flying a spinnaker.  Some skill!


    7 knots+ is still a lot from a bigger boat though. 

  • 04 Sep 2019 08:15
    Reply # 7863007 on 644008

    Is that 7.4knts on the log or GPS?   My Coromandel managed over 9knts......on the GPS!

  • 03 Sep 2019 00:03
    Reply # 7860723 on 7859803
    Anonymous wrote:

    On my last two boats, I have given the rigs a taller mast and thus more halyard drift (than on my Johanna). This has let me move the halyard’s slingpoint 5% aft of the middle of the yard. It could even be an idea to move it 10% aft. This has had two effects:

    ·         The halyard has a bit peaking effect with the sail hoisted, and the YHP (moved 2/3 up the yard) and the THP see lighter loads.

    ·         The sail furls fast and ‘by the book’.

    These days I therefore encourage those who are to rig with a new JR, to fit a tall enough mast. It is easier to shorten a mast than to lengthen it. In addition, a better halyard drift gives more freedom to adjust the sail’s fore-aft position to get the steering balance perfect.

    Arne

    PS: Gary, great to see that you have crossed the ‘sound barrier’  -  seven knots. Only this summer did we manage the same in my Ingeborg. With plenty of wind from behind, and only 4 of 7 panels up, we stayed above seven knots for several minutes, and touched 7.4kts.

     


    I did move the sling point about 150mm aft when I put the sail back on as the batten pockets seem to have altered how the sail hangs. I sometimes wish I had made the mast half a metre longer.
  • 02 Sep 2019 11:00
    Reply # 7859803 on 644008
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    On my last two boats, I have given the rigs a taller mast and thus more halyard drift (than on my Johanna). This has let me move the halyard’s slingpoint 5% aft of the middle of the yard. It could even be an idea to move it 10% aft. This has had two effects:

    ·         The halyard has a bit peaking effect with the sail hoisted, and the YHP (moved 2/3 up the yard) and the THP see lighter loads.

    ·         The sail furls fast and ‘by the book’.

    These days I therefore encourage those who are to rig with a new JR, to fit a tall enough mast. It is easier to shorten a mast than to lengthen it. In addition, a better halyard drift gives more freedom to adjust the sail’s fore-aft position to get the steering balance perfect.

    Arne

    PS: Gary, great to see that you have crossed the ‘sound barrier’  -  seven knots. Only this summer did we manage the same in my Ingeborg. With plenty of wind from behind, and only 4 of 7 panels up, we stayed above seven knots for several minutes, and touched 7.4kts.

     


  • 02 Sep 2019 08:51
    Reply # 7859709 on 7798043
    Gary Pic wrote:

    One thing that is different in the handling of my sail since I added the batten pockets is the sail not longer drops evenly when reefing or furling. The aft end drops first....not sure why yet.

    The same thing always happened on Arion, probably due to friction.  The answer was to keep tension on the yard hauling parrel as I eased the halyard, as this keeps the yard peaked up and the battens come down parallel.  To make it easier, being solo, I installed rope clutches for both the YHP and the LHP.  I would ease the halyard with one hand and haul in the YHP with the other.  Once one panel was down, I'd let the YHP tail go (the clutch kept it taut) and take the slack out of the LHP as well, or my experience was it could cause a tangle if left slack.  Then I would haul in some of the sheet too, before easing some more halyard and repeating the sequence.  I would sometimes forget to release the YHP and LHP clutches before trying to hoist the sail, wondering why it wouldn't go up!  I will install the same system on Blue Moon if I convert the boat to a proper junk this summer.
  • 02 Sep 2019 00:28
    Reply # 7859316 on 7859295
    Gary Pick wrote:

    One of Rosemary's photos from Saturday.

    Great photo, love Mount Warning in the background.  Fist time I have seen it looking east!
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