Ingeborg, Arne's Marieholm IF

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  • 12 Aug 2018 22:04
    Reply # 6527938 on 6527385
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Scott wrote:

    It may be the angle of the photos, but I can't see how that is holding the mast down.  It looks as if the lashings are almost parallel to the step.   I get that how that will keep it from turning, but isn't there enough play to allow the mast to work its way upward?

    Yes, it has a bit to do with the photo angle. The angle of the lashing strings was between 30 and 45 degrees. With the taut Dyneema lines, there is no chance the mast will jump out of the step. I did it this way to prevent the mast from rotating in its step.Arne


    Last modified: 12 Aug 2018 22:05 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 12 Aug 2018 21:37
    Reply # 6527385 on 6415554
    Arne wrote:

    Frank

    here is how I have strapped down Ingeborg's mast. I also wanted to keep the mast from rotating. As can be seen, I smeared some glue in the screw-holes and under the ss-steel hoops before screwing them in place. This is not a particularly wet place (it's dry, actually), so haven't found it necessary to use epoxy.

    I don't claim that this is the 'right', or even a 'good' way of doing it, but it seems to work for me. I have put much more effort in avoiding any leaks past the partners. Even a drop a week is unacceptable.

    Arne

     

    Arne, 

    It may be the angle of the photos, but I can't see how that is holding the mast down.  It looks as if the lashings are almost parallel to the step.   I get that how that will keep it from turning, but isn't there enough play to allow the mast to work its way upward?

    Last modified: 12 Aug 2018 21:38 | Anonymous member
  • 12 Aug 2018 20:37
    Reply # 6526135 on 3032430

    Thank you for the link Annie. I think that's a good tip. And thank you for the effort making the pics Arne. 

    My idea of the mast step is now quite complete!

  • 06 Aug 2018 14:23
    Reply # 6415554 on 3032430
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Frank

    here is how I have strapped down Ingeborg's mast. I also wanted to keep the mast from rotating. As can be seen, I smeared some glue in the screw-holes and under the ss-steel hoops before screwing them in place. This is not a particularly wet place (it's dry, actually), so haven't found it necessary to use epoxy.

    I don't claim that this is the 'right', or even a 'good' way of doing it, but it seems to work for me. I have put much more effort in avoiding any leaks past the partners. Even a drop a week is unacceptable.

    Arne

     

    Last modified: 06 Aug 2018 17:18 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 05 Aug 2018 22:45
    Reply # 6414743 on 6414646
    Frank Schapitz wrote:I was against screwing direct into the mast step because of water soaking in and letting the wood rot away from inside. But after I saw a picture how they build the mast step on the newbridge coromandels I'm not that afraid anymore ....
    If you follow this method, I don't think you'll have any issues of water penetrating the wood.
  • 05 Aug 2018 20:34
    Reply # 6414646 on 3032430

    Arne,

    thank you for your answer. I'm curious to see a picture. I was against screwing direct into the mast step because of water soaking in and letting the wood rot away from inside. But after I saw a picture how they build the mast step on the newbridge coromandels I'm not that afraid anymore ....

    Last modified: 05 Aug 2018 20:35 | Anonymous member
  • 28 Jul 2018 19:09
    Reply # 6402551 on 3032430
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Frank,

    yes, I drilled an 8-10mm hole right through the mast tube, about 150mm above the mast step. Through this hole I put a 250mm long rod. Then I screwed on two steel hoops to the plywood maststep and finally made a Dyneema lashing between the rod and the hoops. That mast will never jump out of that step!

    Arne

    I'll take a photo next time I'm on board.

    Last modified: 28 Jul 2018 19:10 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 28 Jul 2018 16:40
    Reply # 6402434 on 3661481
    Anonymous wrote:
    The mast sole is just a flat plate, firmly attached to the hull. It slopes very gently aft to aid draining. The mast step collar, being a little smaller than the sole, is then trial-fastened with two screws, and the mast is then stepped. If the mast rake is correct, I just add more screws (and/or epoxy) to secure the collar and seal any screw holes.  

    Hi Arne,

    do you use an additional holding-down bolt or wedges to secure the mast inside the collar? We build our mast step in a similar way to yours. I'm scratching my head for days how to secure the mast without screwing metal into the mast step/ plywood to avoid possible rot.



  • 01 May 2018 00:23
    Reply # 6127130 on 3032430

    Lovely photos Arne.  That sail looks quite big enough to me!  I went sailing aboard a bermudian-rigged IF the other day (exactly the same as yours but built here).  The winds were light and we only had the working jib bent on, but the boat slipped along so sweetly, with just the slightest touch of weather helm (I was holding the tiller with two fingers).  I've always loved these boats and that sail increased my affection.  I might not be able to live permanently on one though, unless I had a storage shed ashore!

  • 30 Apr 2018 21:42
    Reply # 6126913 on 3032430
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Thanks, Annie.
    Luckily, I found that I could throttle down the Tohatsu quite a lot before the speed dropped to 5.0kts, so it must be that the speed-drag curve is rapidly getting steeper over 5kts (theoretical hull speed is 6.0kts). 

    I guess 5kts will be the cruising speed under motor  -  that is after all a decent sailing speed for such a small craft.

    Arne.

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