A 7 metre variant of SibLim

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 02 Jan 2020 20:22
    Reply # 8457067 on 8456972
    Annie wrote:
    David wrote:

    Unaccustomed as I am to public blogging, there was a need to gather into one place the descriptions and photos of building the model that are scattered throughout this forum topic, for the guidance of the future builder(s) of the full size boat, and so I've started a blog at:

    https://siblim7m.wordpress.com/

    Comments and suggestions for improvement welcome.

    Hey, good for you, David.  I hope the link gets put on our Useful Links in the Junk Information pages.

    Might I suggest you put a link in your blog to mine?  I know the 7m is built quite differently to how I have built mine, but people can get a general impression, and also look at a larger version if they feel 7m might be a little too small for them.  I shall be a Follower as soon as I work out how to!  I'm excited that this might come to fruition.

    It's there already, in the very first post on 31st December, but I'll try to work out how to put it on a page in the main menu.
  • 02 Jan 2020 20:12
    Reply # 8456972 on 8452826
    David wrote:

    Unaccustomed as I am to public blogging, there was a need to gather into one place the descriptions and photos of building the model that are scattered throughout this forum topic, for the guidance of the future builder(s) of the full size boat, and so I've started a blog at:

    https://siblim7m.wordpress.com/

    Comments and suggestions for improvement welcome.

    Hey, good for you, David.  I hope the link gets put on our Useful Links in the Junk Information pages.

    Might I suggest you put a link in your blog to mine?  I know the 7m is built quite differently to how I have built mine, but people can get a general impression, and also look at a larger version if they feel 7m might be a little too small for them.  I shall be a Follower as soon as I work out how to!  I'm excited that this might come to fruition.

  • 02 Jan 2020 11:53
    Reply # 8452826 on 6010674

    Unaccustomed as I am to public blogging, there was a need to gather into one place the descriptions and photos of building the model that are scattered throughout this forum topic, for the guidance of the future builder(s) of the full size boat, and so I've started a blog at:

    https://siblim7m.wordpress.com/

    Comments and suggestions for improvement welcome.

  • 01 Jan 2020 12:57
    Reply # 8444059 on 6010674

    I've now uploaded an up-to-date drawing of all the plywood components in a form that's ready for a CNC cutting company to work from.

  • 30 Dec 2019 15:03
    Reply # 8425861 on 6010674

    This project is beginning to stir, and wake up from a long, Rip Van Winkle-like sleep. Watch this space.

  • 06 Feb 2019 22:06
    Reply # 7150742 on 7149601
    David Tyler wrote:

    Heavily modified, of course, and his photo gallery shows some interesting ideas, particularly the companionway.

    That looks similar to Mingming II Companionway without as much bridge deck. I like the fire brick on the stove to help the heat stay in the boat longer when the stove is on. I would think it radiates a lot better than the flame gasses. (for some reason my spaces are working this time) I found it hard to see much else in the way of mods but I don't know the boat well to begin with...
  • 06 Feb 2019 09:42
    Reply # 7149601 on 6954893
    David wrote:
    Annie wrote: Well, I'm not sure how prudent I am - my form over the past couple of decades would appear to indicate the opposite if anything - but if the 7m variation can sail around the world, then taking my 8m to Fiji (as I have tentative plans to do) seems less than foolhardy.

    Hey, you might as well dream while you build.

    I wouldn't for a moment want to claim that the SibLim 7 can sail around the world. Only that it should be able to tackle the easier "milk run" trade wind passages across the Atlantic and South Pacific. Size does matter, bigger is better, more is more (BibMim), when the height of breaking waves is more than the beam of the boat is when knockdowns become more likely. As the GGR entrants are demonstrating, 32 - 36ft is a bit marginal for going nonstop south of the Great Capes. 40 - 50ft boats have a rather better track record, eg Hawk, sailed by Evans Starzinger and Beth Leonard, 47ft LOA.

    I would say: dream on, but happiness is adjusting your dreams to realities and practicalities. Yes, SibLim 8 can go to Fiji, as could SibLim 7, but I would hesitate to take either down to Stewart Island. Can SibLim 7 sail from Japan to NZ? According to World Cruising Routes, it could be somewhat of a windward slog to get out to Guam or the Marshall Islands, so the rig had better be pretty good, but then it should be easier on the SE trades past Vanuatu.

    Well, I might have to rethink that.

    The OCC 2018 Awards have just been announced, and the Jester Award has gone to 

    Szymon Kuczynski, Atlantic Puffin

    For his 270-day non-stop singlehanded circumnavigation via the three Great Capes, in a boat of only 6.36m (just under 21ft) LOA and with no outside assistance, a new world record. Click here for more information.

    His boat is a Maxus 22, which is very similar to my Hunter Sonata/Duette and is only rated CE Category C.

    Heavily modified, of course, and his photo gallery shows some interesting ideas, particularly the companionway.

  • 04 Jan 2019 21:26
    Reply # 6983893 on 6010674

    Sure, Len, this is a helpful observation and immediately brings up an idea or two, on how to get around the problem.

    Again I must say though, that it is a method being worked over to suit a boat smaller than this 7M design.... specifically the 5M one mentioned in the other thread about the 5.7M SibLim derivative.

    As you say though, it would be a good thing to work this out on a model, so the final build size is not of that much importance.

    Last modified: 04 Jan 2019 21:30 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Jan 2019 18:53
    Reply # 6983681 on 6982994
    Jeremy Walker wrote:

    At 2M beam, 1/2 beam distance is reachable(with my average length arm as a distance quage), and when one or other of the halves is theoretically flipped to face inside upwards.

    Joining the halves on the centreline, should make the flat workshop floor a convenient flat building bed, on which to  lay the bulkheads and frames-- with the CL horizontal and the waterline vertical.

    I think this is one of those ideas that would need to be modeled. The normal thought (from planking days) has been to put panels on both sides at the same time (or one on one side then one on the other) rather than doing one whole side and then working on the other. The reason given is to keep the stresses balanced on both sides and the craft straight. Doing the build in halves, I would see the hull panels trying to fan the halve bulkheads out as the hull panels try to remain remain flat. Now from origami or stitch&glue building, it can be seen that joining panels already gives shape. I think that where the centre line is put on the floor there would have to be a strong back affixed to the bulkheads to keep it straight until ready to be joined with the other half. I had first thought of anchoring the half to the floor but doing so would take away the ability to turn things over for inside work. The centre hull panel would have to go on last as part of the joining process and would need to have access from the inside for glassing. I think some doubling of structural components may be needed too. Yes, there would have to be a centre hull panel I think even if it was only 200mm wide. If one really wanted a pointy front end, I think a wedge would be mounted over that.

    If it was a usable system, I don't think 2 metres would be a limit. Though it needs to be remembered that the half would still be 2 metres in one dimension.

  • 04 Jan 2019 11:38
    Reply # 6982994 on 6010674

    Although the 5.7M SibLim thread is the apt one for my following suggestions, there could be some value WRT the 7M version... where building is done in the way of filleting, glass taping, and also epoxy painting the interior, whilst still in the early stages of exterior sheeting.

    It should work out to be flipping modules, so that access is possible to all corners, while standing with feet on the workshop floor.

    At 2M beam, 1/2 beam distance is reachable(with my average length arm as a distance quage), and when one or other of the halves is theoretically flipped to face inside upwards.

    Joining the halves on the centreline, should make the flat workshop floor a convenient flat building bed, on which to  lay the bulkheads and frames-- with the CL horizontal and the waterline vertical.

    The topside planking/strake, is bent over and onto(the bulkhead frame structure), as the first sheeting step, with the  chine and the deck/sheer lines being the guides to a fair lay of the panels.....perhaps I do not fully appreciate the details of pre-cut panel construction, but surely accurately cut panels wired together along their edges, should produce a fair curve?

    Stringers and battens strategically placed between the chine will then help to support a fair assembly.

    I would like to see a template panel of the arched deck, used as an assembly aid, and possibly with a small log on the inside edge of this deck template/panel. This, as well as the chine, should create the coreect and fair shape shape?.

    Surely a chine log would not be needed, and double bias taping inside and out would be all that is needed, to create a stiff enough hull piece, that can flipped over for working the inside?

    Last modified: 04 Jan 2019 11:48 | Anonymous member
<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software