A 7 metre variant of SibLim

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  • 10 Dec 2018 21:47
    Reply # 6954290 on 6953026
    Annie Hill wrote:
    David wrote:
    Well, I'm not sure how prudent I am - my form over the past couple of decades would appear to indicate the opposite if anything - but if the 7m variation can sail around the world, then taking my 8m to Fiji (as I have tentative plans to do) seems less than foolhardy.

    Actually, the more I work with this boat, the more confidence I have in her sturdiness and potential seaworthiness.  And I shall certainly have a strong and waterproof companionway/pram hood area.  I have a friend rebuilding a Trekka, who says he's planning to sail with me: it would be interesting to compare our experiences at the end of the passage.

    Hey, you might as well dream while you build.

    Having just re-read the book 'Swirly World Sails South' by Andrew Fagan I have been reminded of how even small yachts can complete a successful ocean crossing provided the vessel is of a seaworthy design and well handled. So when ocean crossing in small boats it is probably not so much a question of is the boat capable  but equally just what comfort level there will be, because the smaller the vessel the less comfort. I have no doubt though that Annie's new boat will be ocean capable, and I think that despite it's small size there will also be a very acceptable level of comfort.
  • 10 Dec 2018 11:19
    Reply # 6953160 on 6951860
    Anonymous wrote: All the talk about southern ocean rollovers got me thinking about how, or whether, this boat could be made ocean-ready. I think it could, with a Mingming-style hinged companionway hatch that could be dogged shut and watertight.

    Met this French couple who had an interesting take on this. At the bottom of the companionway steps beneath the dogged hatch were a pair or race car seats with 5 point harnesses - one on each side. Bolted to the bulkhead. 

    In any event the majority of really bad weather seems to be at the edges of of the oceans rather than the middles (notwithstanding rotating storms).




  • 10 Dec 2018 07:05
    Reply # 6953026 on 6951860
    David wrote: Yes, in the hands of a Prudent Mariner. There's plenty of previous form on this- Trekka, for example. All the talk about southern ocean rollovers got me thinking about how, or whether, this boat could be made ocean-ready. I think it could, with a Mingming-style hinged companionway hatch that could be dogged shut and watertight.The deck is in the right kind of shape, approaching a whaleback form so that water is shed quickly and inverted stability is minimised. That central part of the deck could  even be higher, to further improve that feature, along the lines of the RNLI lifeboats that have high superstructures to make them self-right rapidly. For resistance to knockdown, I think you either go for a deep keel for maximum righting moment, or shoal draught so that you skid down the breaking waves, as catamarans should do, without tripping up, and this design goes the latter way. Carrying capacity is enough for a singlehander to make the long hauls from Canaries to the Windies and from Panama to the Tuamotus.
    Well, I'm not sure how prudent I am - my form over the past couple of decades would appear to indicate the opposite if anything - but if the 7m variation can sail around the world, then taking my 8m to Fiji (as I have tentative plans to do) seems less than foolhardy.

    Actually, the more I work with this boat, the more confidence I have in her sturdiness and potential seaworthiness.  And I shall certainly have a strong and waterproof companionway/pram hood area.  I have a friend rebuilding a Trekka, who says he's planning to sail with me: it would be interesting to compare our experiences at the end of the passage.

    Hey, you might as well dream while you build.

  • 10 Dec 2018 00:46
    Reply # 6952502 on 6951800
    Anonymous wrote:



    Daivd 

    Although I have a boat waiting for me in NZ, the idea of a kit to build and get me to NZ is very enticing.   I actually have a set of Wharram plans sat on my coffee table but SibLim 7m......

    Peter

    Hmmm,

    a 23 foot boat from UK to NZ

    You sure about that ?

    Maybe I am just getting old (well OK I am) but I am thinking that might be marginal.

    Perhaps not, I dunno.


    Gary

    I'm currently living and working in Japan...  It would be Japan to NZ

    Peter

  • 09 Dec 2018 16:26
    Reply # 6951990 on 6951209
    David wrote:

    Bilgeboard cases, end posts glued in place. In the model, these are 25.5 x 8mm, at full size 109 x 34mm.

    In hindsight, these end posts should have been glued to the bulkheads first, while they were still horizontal on the floor, as we did on Annie's SibLim. This would have helped to keep the case sides flat. The exposed faces of both the end posts and the case sides would be glassed, filled and faired and resin coated while still horizontal, in the full size boat.
  • 09 Dec 2018 14:50
    Reply # 6951860 on 6951800
    Gary wrote: Hmmm,

    a 23 foot boat from UK to NZ

    You sure about that ?

    Maybe I am just getting old (well OK I am) but I am thinking that might be marginal.

    Perhaps not, I dunno.

    Yes, in the hands of a Prudent Mariner. There's plenty of previous form on this- Trekka, for example. All the talk about southern ocean rollovers got me thinking about how, or whether, this boat could be made ocean-ready. I think it could, with a Mingming-style hinged companionway hatch that could be dogged shut and watertight.The deck is in the right kind of shape, approaching a whaleback form so that water is shed quickly and inverted stability is minimised. That central part of the deck could  even be higher, to further improve that feature, along the lines of the RNLI lifeboats that have high superstructures to make them self-right rapidly. For resistance to knockdown, I think you either go for a deep keel for maximum righting moment, or shoal draught so that you skid down the breaking waves, as catamarans should do, without tripping up, and this design goes the latter way. Carrying capacity is enough for a singlehander to make the long hauls from Canaries to the Windies and from Panama to the Tuamotus.
  • 09 Dec 2018 12:33
    Reply # 6951804 on 6951800
    Gary Pearce wrote: 
    Hmmm,

    a 23 foot boat from UK to NZ

    You sure about that ?

    well, things like that have been done…

    there was a german family who made the trip around the globe with an 'etap 21'. young andreas (3 years old at departure) enjoyed standing headroom for the first part of the voyage…

    ueli

    Last modified: 09 Dec 2018 12:34 | Anonymous member
  • 09 Dec 2018 11:18
    Reply # 6951800 on 6950605



    Daivd 

    Although I have a boat waiting for me in NZ, the idea of a kit to build and get me to NZ is very enticing.   I actually have a set of Wharram plans sat on my coffee table but SibLim 7m......

    Peter

    Hmmm,

    a 23 foot boat from UK to NZ

    You sure about that ?

    Maybe I am just getting old (well OK I am) but I am thinking that might be marginal.

    Perhaps not, I dunno.


  • 08 Dec 2018 17:09
    Reply # 6951209 on 6010674

    Bilgeboard cases, end posts glued in place. In the model, these are 25.5 x 8mm, at full size 109 x 34mm.

  • 08 Dec 2018 14:06
    Reply # 6951075 on 6010674

    Bearers to support berth locker lids.

    Floor at stn 4.

    Floor at stn 6.

    These two floors are to support the bottom hull panel.

    Forehatch framing completed and forecabin headlining added.

    At full size, thick sheets of MDF would now be put on top of both headlinings, so that they can be walked on.
    Last modified: 08 Dec 2018 14:16 | Anonymous member
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