Good sailcloth for JR

  • 25 Dec 2017 17:39
    Reply # 5648156 on 1206989

    It is not coated and looks the same on each side.  5 year warranty I think. It is softer than Sunbrella and folds/packs down really well. If you are interested in WM80, consider also getting samples of the regular WM and the two weights of Top Notch. All four are similar products.


    e

  • 25 Dec 2017 13:26
    Reply # 5648009 on 5625660
    Annie Hill wrote:Unless you are using a very light fabric, puckering is almost always caused by the tension top and bottom being out of sync.  Another possibility is that you need more foot pressure.  I've been surprised what a difference that can make.

    Sebastian has now made a number of sails from Weathermax.  He could be your 'go to' man for advice.  (Sorry, Sebastian!)


    Does anyone know if the Weathermax 80 is one-sided and how well does it last under the sunlight?

    I am about to start making a new sail and haven't been able to decide if I should go for Weathermax 80 or Dacron. 

  • 22 Dec 2017 06:59
    Reply # 5645868 on 1206989
    I had a long discussion with myself about the colour of the new sail and almost went for wine red - on the other hand I like the excellent visibility of the yellow. I didn't find good polyester webbing that would have suited the wine red cloth, but found it in yellow. Also,  my daughter kept insisting for the latter (yellow being her favourite colour). These things finally settled it :)
  • 22 Dec 2017 02:18
    Reply # 5645740 on 1206989
    It looks like nice stuff, Jami, and seriously UV resistant.  Not, I suppose, that this is a big worry for you.  Still, when you decide to sail around the world ...

    I like the yellow :)


  • 21 Dec 2017 21:51
    Reply # 5645569 on 1206989

    Luckily there is a local seller here in Turku area. They even ordered a full roll of yellow Outguard (from Germany, I suppose) last year, when I needed only two meters for the top panel of the Joe 17's sail.

    I decided to return the favour and buy some 25m of the same yellow fabric now for the sail of Galion 22.

  • 21 Dec 2017 12:47
    Reply # 5645019 on 1206989
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Jami

    Where do you buy that cloth?

    Arne

  • 21 Dec 2017 10:32
    Reply # 5644930 on 1206989
    In hand the 190 gms Outguard feels very, very strong. Plus it has a plentiful choice of colours :)

    The strength and other technical details can be estimated from the data sheet, if one is capable of reading it. I am not...

    Last modified: 21 Dec 2017 10:54 | Anonymous member
  • 21 Dec 2017 08:48
    Reply # 5644890 on 5644479
    Frank Schapitz wrote:

    But I found a cheap exemplar of "Make Your Own Sails by Bowker and Budd" and ordert it. Thats a good thing, thank you for that pointer!

    The 1975 revision has a section on polyester cloth, but still, the book is very dated now. 


    Jami Jokinen wrote:
    I'll be using Swela Outguard for the 25-28m2 sail I'm making for my Galion 22.

    This seems very promising! Even more because of thats a german company and the price fits our budget. Now I m just not sure if 190gsm is enough weight for a 6panel 40sqm sail ....

    It's a little light, but not much too light. The greatest stress is at the peak of a high-peaked sail, the worst bias/cyclical loading is at the throat and the most vulnerable place for flapping and fluttering is all along the leech. If 190gsm cloth is doubled at these places, I think it will be OK. Alternatively, Jami also mentions a 270gsm cloth, which is a little too heavy, but might be used for the top panel.
  • 20 Dec 2017 21:40
    Reply # 5644479 on 5623376

    Thank you all for your replies!


    David wrote:

    Conversely, 8 oz 100% cotton canvas has been making a comeback for medium weight car-camping tents, and I see that 3% shrinkage must be allowed for in this example. Other than that, so long as the cloth has been tightly woven and then proofed against rot and mildew, it will have an acceptable life. But if it is of high quality, I would have to query whether it would cost less than polyester cloth. 


    This looks not bad. A pity that nobody has experience concerning the durability!

    David wrote:

    I think the best course for amateur sailmakers is to find those outlets in your own country that sell bankrupt stock, 'ends of lines' and cloth that is graded as 'second quality' because of cosmetic defects, not because of structural defects. In the UK, one such is englishseadog on eBay.co.uk who acquired the leftovers when the makers of Haywards sailcloth ceased production. Is there anyone similar in Germany or neighbouring countries, Frank? 

    Thats a good hint! I have to dig a little bit more for remaining stock. The problem is that the internet and ebay in particular is full of cloth. Many of them lack of specification and trustworthy data about weight and material. Right now buying new cloth in Germany feels a little bit like gambling. I think it would be better to live on watersport enthusiastic islands like UK or NZ then here :)
     
    But I found a cheap exemplar of "Make Your Own Sails by Bowker and Budd" and ordert it. Thats a good thing, thank you for that pointer!



    Jami wrote:
    I'll be using Swela Outguard for the 25-28m2 sail I'm making for my Galion 22.

    This seems very promising! Even more because of thats a german company and the price fits our budget. Now I m just not sure if 190gsm is enough weight for a 6panel 40sqm sail ....


    Last modified: 21 Dec 2017 23:09 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Dec 2017 11:05
    Reply # 5631312 on 1206989

    Hah! I didn't keep Ivory Gull for more than a few years, but her original sails lasted for about twenty years. Spanish-made acrylic cloth, stitched with black thread, if I remember correctly, but whether the thread was V69 or V92, I can't tell you.

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