Bamboo and Aluminium Battens

  • 07 Feb 2013 00:53
    Reply # 1201111 on 912308
    Deleted user
    Batten fendering was a ongoing research for us. We started out with only batten pockets and they wore through in no time. Our first modification was to put on some high pressure rubber water pipe with the same ID as the OD of the alloy battens. They fit so tight that we had to lubricate them to get them on and they have not budged since. We still have the batten pockets but they were protected with a strip of seat belt webbing.They never wore again and provided an extra layer of padding. The battens are silent. The alloy yards are wrapped with some really cheap rope that gives a nautical look and provides the fendering we needed.
  • 06 Feb 2013 16:34
    Reply # 1200628 on 912308
    For those who are following the bamboo part of this topic, there's more here.
  • 05 Jan 2013 02:56
    Reply # 1172085 on 1170925
    Deleted user
    Gary Pick wrote:I was wondering what to use for batten fendering and I think the simplest is to use 50mm diameter vinyl tubing. It will just slide over the batten and can be held in place by silicon. As for batten parrels I'm still trying to decid whether to use 10mm polypropylene rope inside 12mm poly pipe or 50mm webbing. I have plenty of both.
    Batten fendering , you mean something between the metal of the batten and the
    mast, right?  If so, we had great luck with fire hose scrounged from the local fire department.  The large diameter hose slipped right over the booms and yards.
    The smaller diameter slipped right over the battens.  The rubber inside the hose
    keeps it from sliding around much, and the canvas outer cover slides well up the
    mast.  There is a cutout in the sail batten sleeves where the exposed batten would
    rub against the mast, and with the battens covered in about 12" of hose right there,
    it is very quiet.  No banging and clanking. 
     

    [Webmaster edit: John's link wouldn't work for me: try this one]

    Last modified: 07 Jan 2013 22:01 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Jan 2013 15:00
    Reply # 1171729 on 912308
    I think that sewing padded batten pockets when sewing the sail is what I'll try the next time I'm creating a rig.

    But when the batten fendering job got tough...I persisted rather than going back to sewing to pad pockets. If your sail is done, I'd probably fender the battens.

    Looking back at it, I should have slit my vinyl tube lengthwise and put it on the easy way, then used some sort of lashing to keep it in place. I ended up doing that on one of my yards anyway.
  • 04 Jan 2013 03:02
    Reply # 1171479 on 912308
    The only thing is I haven't use batten pockets, I've used webbing loops. So padding of some sort, I shall think about how I can do that.
  • 04 Jan 2013 02:29
    Reply # 1171464 on 1170925
    Gary Pick wrote:I was wondering what to use for batten fendering and I think the simplest is to use 50mm diameter vinyl tubing. It will just slide over the batten and can be held in place by silicon.

    I have tried that....and it works pretty well. But mine was a VERY tight fit, and took me over a week of fighting with it to force them on. On the bright side, no silicone or other goop needed to hold it in place. Biggest downside now that it is installed is that it creaks and squeaks when the sail bundle swings around my painted mast.

    Just the same, if I had it to do over again...I would skip fendering my battens and try sewing the fendering into my batten pockets, as David Tyler (and others) have done/recommended. It sure sounds easier, and probably quieter too.
  • 03 Jan 2013 10:17
    Reply # 1170925 on 912308
    I was wondering what to use for batten fendering and I think the simplest is to use 50mm diameter vinyl tubing. It will just slide over the batten and can be held in place by silicon. As for batten parrels I'm still trying to decid whether to use 10mm polypropylene rope inside 12mm poly pipe or 50mm webbing. I have plenty of both.
  • 02 Jan 2013 02:22
    Reply # 1170101 on 912308
    So, having an aversion to spending quite small amounts of money I don't have I decided to go with what I could use in the shed.
    What I settled on was to drill the holes out a fraction larger and heat shrinking some insulation over the thread. To isolate the nuts and washers I used a thin slice of clear plastic tubing.
    Probably not a long term solution but working on the belief that cash flow won't be so tight a year down the track I figure it will do for now.
  • 30 Dec 2012 23:17
    Reply # 1169024 on 912308
    Should be fine.
  • 30 Dec 2012 21:27
    Reply # 1168982 on 912308
    I carried out a little test yesterday. I have a supply of heat shrink insulation of around the right diameter. With a bit of heat it fits the shank of the eye bolts perfectly. So I'm thinking with a bit of mastic under the nuts and washers I shouldn't have any electrolysis problems. 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software