Macwester 28 (Atlanta 8.5) conversion

  • 17 Feb 2020 19:21
    Reply # 8752442 on 8751706
    Asmat wrote: NO, Annie! I once anchored off Culatra using a 20 kg Chinese Delta lookee likee and found my 32 footer sliding sideways between other anchored vessels in an 0300 squall. Subsequent tests showed that there's a flaw in the geometry or weight distribution of the counterfeit version, rendering it unreliable. I buried it at sea in a deep hole. I'm happy so far, with my genuine Delta.
    Ah, I should have explained.  This knock off was made by the guy who gave it to me - an engineer - who, so he told me, slavishly copied a friend's genuine Delta.  As he's been anchoring for several decades on the big one he made, he seems to have got it right.  However, it is intended as a back-up anchor (the Manson Supreme will be on the bow) and if it proves unreliable, I shall buy a patent anchor.  I have to say, I would be unhappy buying a copy of any anchor for my bower.  Indeed, come to think of it, I'd always purchase the patent model if buying new.  The Manson I bought second-hand (still with its label!) and had it re-galvanised - the galvanising had worn off the tip.  The cost of the whole package was half the cost of a new anchor: a good way of getting decent ground tackle on a tight budget.
  • 17 Feb 2020 12:09
    Reply # 8751706 on 8751372

    Anonymous wrote: 

    I am perfectly happy with my 10 kg Delta (knock-off) for a second anchor, for the 26ft boat I'm building. 


    NO, Annie! I once anchored off Culatra using a 20 kg Chinese Delta lookee likee and found my 32 footer sliding sideways between other anchored vessels in an 0300 squall. Subsequent tests showed that there's a flaw in the geometry or weight distribution of the counterfeit version, rendering it unreliable. I buried it at sea in a deep hole. I'm happy so far, with my genuine Delta.
  • 17 Feb 2020 06:43
    Reply # 8751372 on 8750855
    Chris wrote:

    Serious cruisers think that the new generation anchors are a quantum leap ahead of the CQR, Delta and Bruce.


    David, that's terrible news for my financial planning!

    But good to know. Thankyou.

    Anchors and boats are odd: occasionally boat A drags all over the place with one anchor and then happily stays put with another.  The owner will swear at the first one and sear by the second one.  On the other hand, boat B will be a headache when anchored on the second anchor but always behave herself on the first. 

    My own choice is a 10kg Manson Supreme, but to be honest, I still have a very soft spot for a Bruce and I am perfectly happy with my 10 kg Delta (knock-off) for a second anchor, for the 26ft boat I'm building.  I have a wee Bruce for a kedge.  Admittedly, some kind soul gave me the Delta, which he had carried, unused, on his boat for 20 years!  One of the really great things about a smaller boat, is that you can 'over-anchor' the boat and still have easily-handled ground tackle.  On Fanshi, I intend to have 8mm chain with my 10kg Manson:  I saw a 45 footer the other day with the same kit!!  Admittedly, that is ludicrous, but there are heaps of boats 10 ft longer than mine where the only difference between their ground tackle and mine is an extra 5 kg on the anchor!

    Anchors may seem expensive, but you will wish you'd invested a bit more money when you are dragging down onto the rocks.  They are not something I would economise on.

    (Those who are still fans of the older-style anchors, can choose to take David's comment about quantum leaps literally!)

  • 16 Feb 2020 23:56
    Reply # 8750855 on 8745346

    Serious cruisers think that the new generation anchors are a quantum leap ahead of the CQR, Delta and Bruce.


    David, that's terrible news for my financial planning!

    But good to know. Thankyou.

  • 13 Feb 2020 18:10
    Reply # 8745346 on 8742044

    Chris,

    I started out with Deltas aboard Tystie, but changed to Rocnas when the Delta let me down once too often, in a strong squall and good holding ground.

    Serious cruisers think that the new generation anchors are a quantum leap ahead of the CQR, Delta and Bruce. They rate the Spade as the best of all, but it's expensive, due to the fabricated construction. The Vulcan has, as nearly as I can see, the same geometry as the Spade, and I have been very happy with mine as the main anchor aboard Weaverbird. I have a Rocna as well, and just once (summer 2018, Acairseid Mhor, F9, rocks close to leeward), I deployed both of them for extra peace of mind, but actually one would have held.

  • 13 Feb 2020 16:07
    Reply # 8745043 on 8742044

    David, some great points there. How high do you rate those anchors over ordinary CQR designs?

     

  • 13 Feb 2020 16:04
    Reply # 8745038 on 8742154
    Anonymous wrote:

    ...with safety in mind I would divide the interior into several watertight compartments. 

    I like it, but that would create a bilge for every compartment, things start to get complicated.

    The most easily flooded compartment is the cockpit, of course, and it could be filled in seconds... maybe I'll start there!

  • 12 Feb 2020 14:01
    Reply # 8742393 on 8742044

    Hello Chris,

    I think you're on the right lines with "economy and simplicity". Too often one sees projects stalling or taking an inordinate amount of time and money because people over-reach themselves, try to do more than their skill level and finances permit, get carried away with gizmos and gadgets, aim for a work of art with finely fitted joinery where a more 'workboat' finish would take a quarter of the time.

    Safety is an attitude of mind as much as a level of equipment. Keep the water out with strong hull, windows, hatches and ventilators; ensure reliable propulsion by both motor and sail; ensure reliable steering; get good new generation ground tackle (Rocna, Vulcan, Manson Supreme); know where you are (two independent sources of GPS position) and you're most of the way there.

    Mast: the hybrid mast remains the pragmatic favourite. Find a 7in tube at a Cardiff aluminium stockholder and make a wooden topmast.

    Sail: use one of Arne's stock designs, and go through his writings on entry-level rig building.

    Interior fitout: exterior grade plywood from SE Asia, coated and bonded with epoxy. Paint it off-white or light cream, adding only the bare minimum of clear finished trim - it's this that takes the time.

    KISS: Simple plumbing, with water drawn straight from 10 litre containers; basin to be emptied overside; composting heads; no other pipework. Simple electrics, a few LED lights; a sounder; a tablet and a phone for navigation, entertainment and communication; a VHF radio. The simplest of cookers. Don't bother with a heater for May to September cruising out of Milford Haven.


  • 12 Feb 2020 10:57
    Reply # 8742154 on 8742044

    Chris, good starting point, with safety in mind I would divide the interior into several watertight compartments.  Not something readily done on an already fitted out boat.

  • 12 Feb 2020 09:35
    Message # 8742044

    Hello Junk riggers,

    I've paid a deposit on a such a boat, moulded 1980 and to some extent equipped. She has never been in the water, and is bare inside other than bulkheads, which was part of the attraction. Although she has a mast and boom, there are no sails. I suspect that I could put a junk rig together for less than the cost of new sails and furling gear. My aim is to live aboard during the warmer part of the year and to cruise. I like safety first, economy and simplicity joint second. That's what drew me to JRs. Flat sails seem to accord with the KISS principle.

    So, preferably without spending big (on "rare" books, for example), is there a road map to success in designing, sizing and costing such conversion?

    Chris


       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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