WeatherMax 80 for junk sails

  • 03 Nov 2019 23:30
    Reply # 8089814 on 8064355

    We used Weathermax 80 for our prototype sails (the 'parchment' colored panels in our icon). No particular problems working with it.

    We've done both; cut with Hot Knife, or scissors and finished with HK. Toss up which we liked better. 

    For the last many sails, we've used dots of hot melt glue to join whatever, including homemade doubled tape (stripped and folded WM80). It's cheap, fast and easy to undo if repositioning is required, and doesn't pick up dust or grit.

    Only caveat is that the dots must be pressed flat as you go, before cooling and setting up hard, so that needles can pass easily through.

    Also, we find that paperclips or bobby pins make good temporary keepers that won't stick us like our pins do and are less prone to push fabric out of line (maybe our pins are dull). A sailmaker friend used staples around the edges!

    Happy sail makin'!

    Dave Z

  • 20 Oct 2019 03:04
    Reply # 8066601 on 8064355

    Annie,

    I sometimes do it the way your friend does, especially if it's on a curve where a straight edge won't work as a guide.  I did it both ways on the WeatherMax, but am not sure I saw much difference in speed or fumes with that fabric.  

    Good luck with the WeatherMax, I think you'll like it.   

     


  • 20 Oct 2019 01:10
    Reply # 8066514 on 8065829
    Anonymous wrote:

    I have only ever made one sail (a small one, with light cloth) so no advice to offer, but I wonder about this because I used lots of basting tape - basted everything -  and sewed through it all the time. Only twice in the entire job I had to a slight problem re-threading because of a little bit of glue in the eye of the needle - which took a few seconds to fix - no real problem at all. Certainly it did not cause any problem to the machine. I wonder if there are differences in the type of tape? 


    Different machines respond differently to the basting tape. In general domestic machines struggle, however older type domestic 1940 - 1970 machines tend to do better. Commercial machines and the Sailrites don't seem much bothered.

    You can keep the needle clean by wiping it with acetone every couple of seams.. There is also a needle lubricant called "Sewer's Ease" that helps as well.

  • 20 Oct 2019 00:52
    Reply # 8066491 on 8065357
    Gary wrote:

    I've been thinking of getting a hot knife as I've been using scissors but I hadn't thought of using a soldering iron. I must try it on a bit of scrap. I  also tried using double sided tape but the machine hated it.

    My friend, who is a sailmaker, uses a hot knife very differently from how most amateurs do.  She cuts the cloth with shears and then slides the hot knife along the cut edge - if possibly, sliding the material over a sheet of glass, but moving the glass if that's necessary.  It's a lot quicker, and makes far fewer fumes than slowly and painfully dragging the knife along your mark.

    Apparently, if you aren't careful, you can end up with 'carpet tape' when you ask for double sided.  The glue on this will definitely gum up your needle.  Thrifty souls may find using the tape in the same way as pins, ie a short strip every few cm, makes the cost seem less of an issue.  It also means it's easier to undo a misaligned seam.

    Thanks for the tips on the Weathermax, by the way: it's what I'm intending to use.

    Last modified: 20 Oct 2019 01:02 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Oct 2019 20:50
    Reply # 8065829 on 8064355

    I have only ever made one sail (a small one, with light cloth) so no advice to offer, but I wonder about this because I used lots of basting tape - basted everything -  and sewed through it all the time. Only twice in the entire job I had to a slight problem re-threading because of a little bit of glue in the eye of the needle - which took a few seconds to fix - no real problem at all. Certainly it did not cause any problem to the machine. I wonder if there are differences in the type of tape? 

  • 19 Oct 2019 16:51
    Reply # 8065610 on 8064355

    Gary,

    A trick to avoiding sewing machine issues when using double sided tape is to go with a wider seam, say 1" (25mm) between panels and use narrow tape, like 3/8" (10mm) right down the middle.  Stitch lines can then go beside the tape, not through it.  This can also work with tabling, batten pockets, etc.  

    Hope this helps.

     



  • 19 Oct 2019 11:36
    Reply # 8065357 on 8064355

    I've been thinking of getting a hot knife as I've been using scissors but I hadn't thought of using a soldering iron. I must try it on a bit of scrap. I  also tried using double sided tape but the machine hated it.

  • 18 Oct 2019 17:06
    Message # 8064355

    I'm recently became a JRA member and also recently finished building a 7.2 meter catamaran with a biplane ketch junk rig.  I used WeatherMax 80 for the sails and since there's been some discussion about challenges with using this fabric, I wanted to pass along a few tips I found useful.  I found the fabric pleasant to work with and hope this information might be useful for others.  

    Here's a link to my blog page on making the sails:

    http://omick.net/adventure/minimus_ii/building/junk_sails.html   

    This is my first post, so hopefully I inserted the link correctly.

    Cheers, David 

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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