Horsed sheets

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  • 19 Dec 2011 19:14
    Reply # 777311 on 777041
    Lesley Verbrugge wrote:David,

    Have had a look at your sheeting idea - do you think it would work with 40' Crib? I do prefer that solution to fixed points that we'd need to go onto deck to change. We've a couple of substantial deck fittings at the right position on the side decks. Any recommendation on rope thickness to use?

    Thanks
    Lesley
    Lesley,
    I see no reason why the system cannot be used on larger boats, with some of the side benefits that Bernard mentions. 
    But, of course, the loads will be greater. I suggest rope, blocks and clutches of the same size as the sheet. Fit a block to the deck strong point each side, and a clutch such that the span line can be lead to a winch, if possible, for shortening back the span line after taking deep reefs.
    For a first try, though, just tie the line to the strong point and see whether you like the effect.
    On your foresail, wasn't there also the question of excessive twist, due to having a lot of balance area low down? This system should help with resolving that.
    David.
  • 19 Dec 2011 13:07
    Reply # 777086 on 773708
    Deleted user
    Having got onto the website, (Lesley Verbrugge inspired), I thought I would add my penny'orth!

    I have my fore and main sheets on travellers.  When going downwind in a variable wind, or when yawing is induced by a lumpy sea, it is very useful to be able to pay out the sheets until the sails are at least abeam to avoid inadvertent jybing when goosewinging.   By using the traveller to take the sheeting point closer to the ship's side, it is possible to reduce the compression loads in battens and booms induced by the sheets.  This of course is not applicable to rigs with standing rigging that prevent the sails going that far forward.   Travellers also enable sheeting to windward, which can be useful for swinging the ship before breaking out an anchor if an engine is either not fitted or not serviceable, and in extremis, making a sternboard.   Of course, if you go for twin sheeting, they are not needed, but if you do not, they do have their uses.
  • 19 Dec 2011 10:57
    Reply # 777041 on 773708
    Anonymous
    David,

    Have had a look at your sheeting idea - do you think it would work with 40' Crib? I do prefer that solution to fixed points that we'd need to go onto deck to change. We've a couple of substantial deck fittings at the right position on the side decks. Any recommendation on rope thickness to use?

    Thanks
    Lesley
  • 19 Dec 2011 09:40
    Reply # 777024 on 776754
    Gary King wrote:I liked your mast building masterclass in the newsletter too, Annie.
    For the wooden half of the mast, I tried to find a reason not to use treated radiata pine, couldn't find one, instead Larry Pardey actually recommending it! Thats another cost saver, not mention, a mast that will last forever!

    Gary: For all that engine /driveshaft work,  I have one word for you - "outboard".

    If this goes any further, we'll start a new thread.  (Many thanks for your comments on my piece in the Newsletter.)  Now I have the greatest respect for Larry as a sailor and as a boatbuilder, but would have to point out he has no experience with free-standing masts.  I don't think Oz Radiata is much different from NZ and frankly, with about 2 growth rings per inch, I would be dubious about using it for a boat hook.  A compromise cheap-and-cheerful solution would be to laminate up solid masts (with a wee hole for wires) out of that clever jointed radiata.  Then, your multiple laminates would compensate for the intrinsic - I'm sorry, I have to say this - crappiness of the wood.

    Saildrive is not a bad alternative, either - but this will bring down a ton of refuting posts, I know!
    Last modified: 19 Dec 2011 09:41 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Dec 2011 03:03
    Reply # 776820 on 773708
    Gary King wrote:Does anyone have their sheet anchored to a traveller?
    PJR's opinion on them isnt great, but on a bermudan I'd have trouble going to windward without one.
    For an alternative to the traveller, have a look at what I did on my 25ft "Lliutro", back in 1990 - Newsletter no. 21, pages 24 - 25.
    The main requirement is to be able to sheet the top of the sail to weather. The bottom of the sail is better sheeted to the centreline, to give some downwards pull on the boom.
  • 19 Dec 2011 02:16
    Reply # 776754 on 773708
    Deleted user
    Don't worry, there's heaps more spending than that to do, keel and masts for a starters.
    I liked your mast building masterclass in the newsletter too, Annie.
    For the wooden half of the mast, I tried to find a reason not to use treated radiata pine, couldn't find one, instead Larry Pardey actually recommending it! Thats another cost saver, not mention, a mast that will last forever!

    Gary: For all that engine /driveshaft work,  I have one word for you - "outboard".
    Last modified: 19 Dec 2011 02:21 | Deleted user
  • 18 Dec 2011 21:02
    Reply # 776649 on 776320
    Gary King wrote:Thank g*d for that, Slieve, two sets of track hardware was working out close to $500...
    There's another happy difference between bermudan and junk. Couldn't do the snap shackle trick on a bermudan, letting out the sheet in a good breeze sees the main flog violently & the whole rig shudder. But I'm led to believe junk sails don't flog anywhere near as much making your option viable. 
    So that $500 will have to find some other black hole to disappear into...
    Too easy, my next $500 goes on wet exhaust hose and the gear/throttle lever etc!
  • 18 Dec 2011 08:21
    Reply # 776455 on 773708
    Alas, Gary, that will be only too easy!
  • 18 Dec 2011 03:06
    Reply # 776320 on 773708
    Deleted user
    Thank g*d for that, Slieve, two sets of track hardware was working out close to $500...
    There's another happy difference between bermudan and junk. Couldn't do the snap shackle trick on a bermudan, letting out the sheet in a good breeze sees the main flog violently & the whole rig shudder. But I'm led to believe junk sails don't flog anywhere near as much making your option viable. 
    So that $500 will have to find some other black hole to disappear into...
  • 17 Dec 2011 11:01
    Reply # 776003 on 773708
    Anonymous
    Thank you Slieve for that. It makes good sense. We have travellers fitted to pushpit and deck. Mostly we forget to use them!  Shock horror!

    We want to bring our lines in through the coaming as I am sick of stubbing my toes on the fairleads that are on deck, so we're faced with either dispensing with the foresail traveller
     or raising it up so the lines can run under it. Your idea of using snap shackles to move the sheeting out is an excellent idea. Thank you!
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