Ways of sheeting a JR

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  • 02 Dec 2018 04:24
    Reply # 6941642 on 6937734
    Arne wrote:

    Interesting, Paul,
    practical experience beats my armchair theories.

    Paul is talking about the sail he is making for Roger Fullerton's schooner, and it hasn't been finished yet, let alone bent on.  So the euphroe system has yet to be tried!
  • 01 Dec 2018 22:02
    Reply # 6941401 on 6940020
    Anonymous wrote:

    Conclusion: Different sail planforms need different sheet layouts  - the one size fits all doesn’t apply here...

    Cheers,
    Arne

     
    Arne--I have not needed it, but early on, to solve my dmin problem, I thought I could use an oversize block like in the pic below that would pass one, maybe both, of the thimbles (B &C in your diagram) . The block in the pic can pass knots in 5/8" line.
    Last modified: 01 Dec 2018 22:05 | Anonymous member
  • 01 Dec 2018 01:08
    Reply # 6940656 on 6937734
    Anonymous wrote:

    Interesting, Paul,
    practical experience beats my armchair theories. On my last three boats, I am pushing the d-min limits with the space-demanding Johanna-sheeting. I cannot haul the furled bundle to the cl. I choose to accept that as long as I can sheet the sail in for fully close-hauled sailing, even with only 2-3 panels set. I am reluctant to trade away the anti-twist properties of the Johanna-sheeting.

    Does your boat have port-stbd. sheeting on any of the sails? I hope you can draw up your sheeting plan and let us see it.

    Arne


    Arne, only just trying this... will report back later in the month with pics, drawings and results. It's nothing original or radical, I'm just trying the arrangement shown in fig 4.52, pg 77, Ch The Sheets in PJR. Oh and it's because I'm trying to make single sheeting work for this boat.


  • 30 Nov 2018 20:00
    Reply # 6940256 on 6940200
    Anonymous wrote:
     but I guess she is special...

    I agree. Every Folkboat (or IF-boat or International Folkboat?) is easy on the eyes. Ingeborg in particular looks very nice without any lifelines or jib cluttering up the pretty lines.

  • 30 Nov 2018 19:13
    Reply # 6940200 on 6940195
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    . That should be point that closely to the wind, or?...    
    Anonymous wrote

    Arne,

    If I understand correctly then you need to have, at minimum, three panels raised to set the sail. Is that correct?


    No, even though I cannot sheet the deeply-reefed sail to the cl, I can still sheet it close enough for close-hauled sailing. Remember, when sailing upwind with a JR without a jib in front of it, the clew of the sail is nearly over the rail. It is not sheeted nearly as close to the cl. as the main of a Bermuda sloop.

    Actually, while sailing in a new rig, I adjust the length of the sheetlet bridles going to the boom and the two lowest battens, so that with at least two reefs in the sail, the lowest point (Point B in the diagram) hits the deck block, when fully close-hauled. If I haul in more on the sheet, the boom will not move, only the upper section of the sail.
    If I reef all the way down to two panels, the sheeting angle will be a little wider, but that is ok, as the boat cannot point that close to the wind with only two panels set. Ingeborg still tacks and sail to windward with two panels, though, but I guess she is special...

    Arne

    PS: I have a habit of rigging my boats with a SA/disp. over 20, which means that I have to reef away one to four panels quite often. Easy reefing and good performance of the reefed sail is therefore important to me.

    PS 1. Dec: A little grammer question from a polar monkey: "cannot point that close to the wind - that should be "... closely to the wind", or?

    Last modified: 01 Dec 2018 07:21 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 30 Nov 2018 19:07
    Reply # 6940195 on 6940020
    Anonymous wrote:

    in harbour, a rope hoop tied to the port side deck has been made to hold down the furled sheet bundle. The fact that the sheet does not fill the D-min requirements has thus been compensated for. 

    Arne,

    If I understand correctly then you need to have, at minimum, three panels raised to set the sail. Is that correct?


  • 30 Nov 2018 17:49
    Reply # 6940020 on 6936243
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Robert,
    your sheet layout seems to be good for your sail. The layout of the Johanna-style sails is very different from that of your split JR. Not only is the sheet load likely to be generally lighter in your rig than in my (lower balance) sails. In addition, the unsheeted top section  area is much smaller than on the fan-topped Johanna sails. I found out by trial and error that the antitwist properties of the Pilmer sheeting was only just adequate, and unwanted twist developed if I reefed. Then I modified the upper part of the Pilmer sheeting to the Johanna version (I actually did that at the end of my Malena ownership). The good thing is that I can reef the sail and retain a good, moderate twist with this sheeting. I think that is a reason why Ingeborg is now faster to windward with one or two reefs (than 7-up), if there is enough wind to warrant the reefs.

    To me, first priority is on performance and easy handling under sail. As the photo shows; in harbour, a rope hoop tied to the port side deck has been made to hold down the furled sheet bundle. The fact that the sheet does not fill the D-min requirements has thus been compensated for. I’ll rather do it that way than sailing with too much twist  -  or worse, having to struggle with an euphroe...

    Conclusion: Different sail planforms need different sheet layouts  - the one size fits all doesn’t apply here...

    Cheers,
    Arne

     
  • 30 Nov 2018 15:16
    Reply # 6939476 on 6937734
    Anonymous wrote:

    ROn my last three boats, I am pushing the d-min limits with the space-demanding Johanna-sheeting. I cannot haul the furled bundle to the cl. I choose to accept that as long as I can sheet the sail in for fully close-hauled sailing, even with only 2-3 panels set. I am reluctant to trade away the anti-twist properties of the Johanna-sheeting.

    Arne

    Re: dmin. You may have already tryed this? My sheeting requirements are same as yours.....6 battens. I initially used your sheeting (still do for the 3 lower battens) but for the upper 3 I changed to Fig. 4.28 in HM. So instead of  4/3, 1/3, 1/3 power, from the top I now have 2/3, 2/3, 2/3 but the dmin increased about 30 cm (0.25*P) which I needed. No change in the straightness of the leech. However, my yard angle is only 35 or so degrees...less loading than your rig. That may be why Fig 4.28 works for me but may not work for you?

    rself

    Last modified: 30 Nov 2018 15:23 | Anonymous member
  • 30 Nov 2018 15:12
    Reply # 6939457 on 6937734
    Anonymous wrote:

    ROn my last three boats, I am pushing the d-min limits with the space-demanding Johanna-sheeting. I cannot haul the furled bundle to the cl. I choose to accept that as long as I can sheet the sail in for fully close-hauled sailing, even with only 2-3 panels set. I am reluctant to trade away the anti-twist properties of the Johanna-sheeting.

    Arne

    Re: dmin. You may have already tryed this? My sheeting requirements are same as yours.....6 battens. I initially used your sheeting (still do for the 3 lower battens) but for the upper 3 I changed to Fig. 4.28 in HM. So instead of  4/3, 1/3, 1/3 power, from the top I now have 2/3, 2/3, 2/3 and gained about 30 cm in dmin
  • 29 Nov 2018 10:14
    Reply # 6937734 on 6936243
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Interesting, Paul,
    practical experience beats my armchair theories. On my last three boats, I am pushing the d-min limits with the space-demanding Johanna-sheeting. I cannot haul the furled bundle to the cl. I choose to accept that as long as I can sheet the sail in for fully close-hauled sailing, even with only 2-3 panels set. I am reluctant to trade away the anti-twist properties of the Johanna-sheeting.

    Does your boat have port-stbd. sheeting on any of the sails? I hope you can draw up your sheeting plan and let us see it.

    Arne


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