Conversion Westerly 22

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  • 04 Jun 2019 11:37
    Reply # 7554709 on 7238856
    Anonymous wrote:

    Ah, she looks so sweet!  They are lovely wee boats.  I can't wait to see her under sail.  Send us some pics and 500 words so that we can make her the Featured Boat on the website!



    Thank you for your kind words and sorry for our sluggish communication. To finish the boat and move onto it, resolve all the land life things like flats, furniture and insurances stressed us out. But now after the launch, the long transit through the inland waterways and our first sails we are getting a little bit more relaxed. When we have a little more experience with the boat and rig we will write something down and we would be honored to be Featured Boat. Until then we have a few pictures and short videos on our Instagram account:

    https://www.instagram.com/findingdryland/


  • 21 Mar 2019 20:25
    Reply # 7238856 on 6285145

    Ah, she looks so sweet!  They are lovely wee boats.  I can't wait to see her under sail.  Send us some pics and 500 words so that we can make her the Featured Boat on the website!

  • 21 Mar 2019 18:22
    Reply # 7238609 on 6285145

    The mast fits :)


    And the sail is almost ready!

    Last modified: 21 Mar 2019 18:25 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Mar 2019 21:23
    Reply # 7199152 on 6285145

    He Arne,

    I think we stick to the "traditional" way this time. But we copied your masthead idea, thanks for that!


  • 13 Oct 2018 18:50
    Reply # 6720684 on 6720447
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Frank wrote:

    I have done a complete drawing with 7 panels. So far everything looks good to me, what's your opinion? Thanks again for your help, it's really appreciated!


    Frank

    Your sail looks good in my eyes, except for one thing  -  the way it is tilted forward. I have been careful to rig my latest sails with a vertical leech, or even leaning a bit aft. This, combined with avoiding battens protruding from the leech, has ensured that the sheets never catch the battens or boom in a gybe, or when tacking.

    Now I took the liberty and grabbed a sail from my stack of master sails (AR=1.85), and then crimped and superimposed it onto your rig, so you can see what I mean.

    I know that Hasler and McLoed used to tilt their sails forward, but after having sailed with a sail this way, I now try to avoid it, if I can.

    Anyway, good luck!

    Arne


    Last modified: 13 Oct 2018 18:52 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 13 Oct 2018 11:19
    Reply # 6720467 on 6285145

    All good, Frank. I can't see anything that I'd want to change.

  • 13 Oct 2018 10:22
    Reply # 6720447 on 6718465
    Anonymous wrote:

    Yes, the seven panel sail, the third drawing, looks sound, sensible and seamanlike to me.

    That's encouraging, thank you :)

    I have done a complete drawing with 7 panels. So far everything looks good to me, what's your opinion? Thanks again for your help, it's really appreciated!

  • 11 Oct 2018 20:43
    Reply # 6718465 on 6285145

    Yes, the seven panel sail, the third drawing, looks sound, sensible and seamanlike to me.

    The six panel sail would look better if the lower three panels were made wider - somewhere between the first and second drawings.

    Last modified: 11 Oct 2018 20:47 | Anonymous member
  • 11 Oct 2018 20:29
    Reply # 6718443 on 6285145

    That is a good point I think. The transitional panel with the altered angles doesn't look quiet right because of the luff width. After that I had the idea to just use 3 head panels. I scratched my head and couldn't find any cons then the more weight from the extra batten and the more work sewing another panel. But I bet that there is another drawback. If not I would go with the plan with 7 panels.

  • 09 Oct 2018 08:59
    Reply # 6714123 on 6285145

    Frank,
    With a low AR sail like this, I would certainly adopt a transitional panel, the third one from the top, so as to make the top two panels a little smaller. Try rotating the top sheeted batten by 10˚ or so, and the topmost batten by 5˚ or so. This doesn't affect the amount of batten stagger, but does even out the lengths of the leeches and the areas of the upper panels. 

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