Mast repair advice

  • 21 Sep 2017 09:11
    Reply # 5272857 on 5272350
    Bruno Gouget wrote:

    Sorry,    this is the new link. 

    Please consider the phrase in the cartoon like a French touch! 


    Wonderful!  Another for my collection on the doors of the beer locker :-)
  • 21 Sep 2017 01:31
    Reply # 5272350 on 5262807

    Sorry,    this is the new link. 

    Please consider the phrase in the cartoon like a French touch! 

  • 20 Sep 2017 22:23
    Reply # 5272192 on 5271103
    David Tyler wrote:
    David Tyler wrote:

    Bruno,

    If you should happen to read this, please could you Google "H M Bateman cartoons", and then draw one entitled "The man who drilled a hole in a junk rig aluminium mast at deck level" ready for the next JRA magazine?

    Thanks.

    What not to do!

    David, I tried the link, but it says photo not there or may already have been deleted :-(
  • 20 Sep 2017 16:34
    Reply # 5271519 on 5262807

    I have attempted to write a reply for times but each time the web sure throws it away.

    I have the mast down today and count six holes at deck level:

    • Three rivets hold a collar for the mast hinge sleeve
    • Two ceiling level holes might have been intended for wiring
    • One hole into the collar to retain the sleeve (made by me)
    The mast is mysterious. It was made by Proctor but I can't find anyone who knows about it. I have a piece of paper that came with the boat that mentions “the unique Sunbird mast ” but Robin Blain does not know it and there are also instructions for a quite different mast with a boxy tabernacle.

    If anyone wants to trawl through my my posts about the mast and figure it out I'd be curious!

    It's taken me under bridges, through the Dutch canals, and across the North Sea so I can't really complain.


  • 20 Sep 2017 12:04
    Reply # 5271103 on 5263518
    David Tyler wrote:

    Bruno,

    If you should happen to read this, please could you Google "H M Bateman cartoons", and then draw one entitled "The man who drilled a hole in a junk rig aluminium mast at deck level" ready for the next JRA magazine?

    Thanks.

    What not to do!
  • 18 Sep 2017 21:48
    Reply # 5266873 on 5266343
    Peter Scandling wrote: The current mast on Tara is a Needlespar's product, I believe, which I will soon be removing.  You are more than welcome to it for a nominal sum....

    What an extraordinarily generous offer! I will send you email.



  • 18 Sep 2017 21:22
    Reply # 5266791 on 5264891
    Richard Brooksby wrote:

    This might be a good time to ask where I might look for / how I might build a replacement mast. A mast with a hinge is handy for coastal exploration but I've long been a bit dubious about using it for, say, the transatlantic Jester Challenge. A mid-ocean dismasting would not be fun. David Tyler's shock at my hole-making has reminded me about all the other holes!

    The existing mast is basically a heavily modified 8m × 100m tube of 3mm aluminium alloy.

    Always welcome to take a look at the sleeve that holds Siskin's mast in together - very heavy duty.
  • 18 Sep 2017 16:56
    Reply # 5266343 on 5265809
    Richard Brooksby wrote:

    Thanks Kurt. I'm very interested to hear stories of this kind.

    I'm currently working my way through the long and venerable “Mast materials and Specifications” thread. There's a lot of information to absorb. I hope I can distill it into a useful summary for Coromandel sailors.

    Needlespar have given me a rough estimate of £800-£1200 + VAT for a new tapered mast of about my size. I will collect more data.

    Richard 

    The current mast on Tara is a Needlespar's product, I believe, which I will soon be removing.  You are more than welcome to it for a nominal sum....

    Peter

  • 18 Sep 2017 14:03
    Reply # 5266046 on 5263634
    Richard Brooksby wrote:

    I'm a bit concerned about leaving any sharp-edges scratches made by stainless-steel screw heads, which is why I thought it would be a good idea to polish them out.

    I'm much less worried about a smooth round hole, but I'll gladly listen to actual experience over materials science theory.



    In the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul world of Aerospace, I have never, in my recollection, sent a part out that has a sharp-edge scratch- they cause stress risers.  I don't think that these scratches you show are major concerns, but as a matter of... I dunno... principle... if it were mine, I would debur and blend them out.  Gently, though, just to get rid of the rapid angular transitions.  Plus, it ensures that you've left fewer micro-crevices.  Probably not necessary in this case, but since you've got it right there and some sandpaper handy...
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
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