US junk Rigged sloop

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  • 24 Mar 2020 17:55
    Reply # 8854148 on 8797011

    Congratulations, Carol! I look forward to hearing about your first experiences sailing her and adapting to the junk rig.

  • 23 Mar 2020 02:01
    Reply # 8849070 on 8797011

    Thank you, Graham, David and Dennis!  Quest is supposed to begin her long journey to the West Coast tomorrow morning.  Peter Guest, the previous owner, has done a great job of packing her up, including a double tarp wrapping of the sail and batten bundle,which just won't fit below, so I'm hoping she'll have a smooth trip.

  • 22 Mar 2020 18:44
    Reply # 8848374 on 8797011

    I join in the congratulations.  I was waiting until Spring to go out there, but "you snooze, you loose".

    Do keep us all posted

    Dennis

  • 21 Mar 2020 23:55
    Reply # 8847470 on 8797011

    Carol congratiations!  I am sorry you are not keeping her here!  I just bought a badger in VT and am bringing her down./  Best of luck, this virus is playing havoc with our plans.  That's a lovely boat you bought.

    Fair Winds,

    David

  • 21 Mar 2020 22:59
    Reply # 8847409 on 8797011

    Well done, Carol, you have found yourself a very beautiful boat.  I look forward to seeing and hearing more of your experiences aboard.  Take lots of photos and write us a nice little story for the JRA magazine in due course!  I am sure we will all be happy to answer any queries you have. Good luck.

  • 21 Mar 2020 20:54
    Reply # 8847201 on 8797011

    Hello all,

    This, my first post, is to introduce myself and let you know that I have just purchased Quest.  Like several of you, I have lingered over the Yachtworld listing for a while, and finally decided to go for it.  I flew East from California, got a survey that reassured me that her hull is sound, wrote checks, tried to pay close attention to the long-time owner's information, and started the re-documentation and trucking arrangements on my way through Boston Airport and back to California.  I arrived back here just in time for the Bay Area "shelter in place" regulations, which are now statewide due to Coronavirus. Quest is supposed to arrive in California in ten days, a trip that will involve a couple of different trailers and trucks.  She may be on the hard for a while, while the pandemic runs its course; at 74, although hardy, I need to be cautious. My sailing experience includes a mostly double-handed circumnavigation, but I have only sailed once on a junk: a heavy steel Colvin, where I couldn't lift the yard off the sail bundle with the halyard.  At 5'10", and with a smaller boat, lighter rig, and self-tailing winch, I hope to have a few years with Quest, in San Francisco Bay and the Delta, as well as Southern California's Channel Islands.  Though the previous owner had Quest since 1996, re-rigged with a "kit" from Robin Blaine and Alan Boswell around 2003 or so, and is amenable to answering my many questions, I know I will be asking lots of questions here, too.








    Last modified: 21 Mar 2020 20:55 | Anonymous member
  • 07 Mar 2020 20:35
    Reply # 8808026 on 8804084
    Anonymous wrote:

    David,

    From the details:   "The tapered aluminum mast is in made of 6061 aluminum alloy with a wall thickness of 1/4" and a height from the deck of 38'8" and from the water line, 42'11'

    No word on mast diameter.  I agree that the first boat buying rule I learned (the hard way of course) was to sail a season before making changes for anything other than safety. 

    To me, the only think "necessary" are lifelines.  Maybe a boom gallows.

    In the USA a 6061 tapered pole would be unusual. Maybe in 1974 they were made? These days all the flagpoles, lighting poles, etc I've researched were 6063. 6061 is stronger with yield strength around 35,000 psi; 6063 around 23,000 psi.

    Possibly the builder fabricated a pole by combining lengths and the base at the deck is 6061. That'd be the ideal. Only the builder knows for sure.

    Last modified: 07 Mar 2020 20:45 | Anonymous member
  • 06 Mar 2020 18:37
    Reply # 8804084 on 8797011

    David,

    From the details:   "The tapered aluminum mast is in made of 6061 aluminum alloy with a wall thickness of 1/4" and a height from the deck of 38'8" and from the water line, 42'11'

    No word on mast diameter.  I agree that the first boat buying rule I learned (the hard way of course) was to sail a season before making changes for anything other than safety. 

    To me, the only think "necessary" are lifelines.  Maybe a boom gallows.

  • 06 Mar 2020 17:00
    Reply # 8803893 on 8797011

    SA/D of 15.7 is not bad for a cruising boat, and there's a generously-sized diesel for those light airs to windward. Looking at the photos, it appears by eye that the sail is big enough. There's plenty of drift for the halyard, it's true, so another panel on the foot is a possibility, but the mast looks a bit slender (is the diameter known?). I'd sail for a summer before considering major changes. I always like to get the most power that I can out of a given area by optimising camber, rather than just piling on more area.

  • 06 Mar 2020 13:04
    Reply # 8800745 on 8797011

    David (Dawes),

    With a sail area lists at 529 sq ft and a displacement (of the Atkin "Tern) of 12,500, the boat has a ratio of 15.7.  I think it is definitely under canvased. 

    Is there hoist room to add another lower panel?

    Any thoughts from those who (unlike me) know what they are talking about?


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