Another write up by Arne Kverneland

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  • 09 Feb 2024 16:22
    Reply # 13313117 on 13312998
    Anonymous wrote:

    Sailcloth is cloth that is conceived, designed and manufactured specifically for making sails but one of the wonderful things about junkies is that we make sails out of all sorts of things from cheap tarpaulins to hot-air-balloon fabric and even “real” sailcloth. I think using the term sailcloth in a junk write-up isn’t quite right. Although once you’ve chosen a certain fabric to make your sail it does become your sailcloth. 

    Are rice sacks sailcloth?
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  • 09 Feb 2024 14:18
    Reply # 13312998 on 869421

    Sailcloth is cloth that is conceived, designed and manufactured specifically for making sails but one of the wonderful things about junkies is that we make sails out of all sorts of things from cheap tarpaulins to hot-air-balloon fabric and even “real” sailcloth. I think using the term sailcloth in a junk write-up isn’t quite right. Although once you’ve chosen a certain fabric to make your sail it does become your sailcloth. 

  • 08 Feb 2024 15:57
    Reply # 13312512 on 13312375
    Anonymous wrote:

    The word sailcloth has been in widespread use for many years

    I did not expect an offhand comment to generate such a thread.... I must be in the right place  ;)
  • 08 Feb 2024 11:40
    Reply # 13312375 on 869421

    The word sailcloth has been in widespread use for many years and is in the English dictionary. It covers every sort of sail-making material. The Wiki description just about sums it up: Sailcloth is cloth used to make sails. It can be made of a variety of materials, including natural fibers such as flax, hemp, or cotton in various forms of sail canvas, and synthetic fibers such as nylon, polyester, aramids, and carbon fibers in various woven, spun, and molded textiles. Wikipedia

  • 05 Feb 2024 22:05
    Reply # 13311018 on 869421

    I'd just like to give a plug here for my preferred UK supplier of sailcloth, soft (great for barrel-cambered and tucked panels), and hard (great for flat-cut and shelved panels) in various widths, colours and weights. I made a number of successful sails from these:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/englishseadog/Sailcloth/_i.html?store_cat=9085018010

    I see that there is some soft sailcloth up to 2 metres wide, which would help greatly when cutting a panel out of a single cloth, keeping the threadline close to parallel to the leech (as it should be). 

  • 05 Feb 2024 15:37
    Reply # 13310729 on 869421
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Graeme is right about the Norwegian term «seilduk». Btw. “duk” used alone is often used about table-cloth. As for “duck”; I frequently find it in books written by fellow Americans, Howard Chappelle and Bill Atkins.

    Another thing from that Chapter 5:
    I write about the barrel cut method as if it were ‘meat and potatoes’. In fact, the method has sometimes been debated as to if or how it works. After all, asking a perfectly flat piece of  canvas to take a 3-dimensional, baggy shape, is quite something. That is why I nailed up a test panel before making my first cambered panel sail (NL 30).

    For many years it was thought (by me as well) that it was the softness of the fabric which saved the day. Only a couple of years ago did it slowly dawn to me that this probably was not the case.

    The fact is that the warp of the fabric is running parallel with the battens, so will not permit much horizontal stretch. Then, by looking more closely at a number of photos of Ingeborg’s sail, taken at right angle, I could spot a small but noticeable hollow at luff and leech. I had not reckoned with the extra length needed along the middle of the panel to make that camber. The sail sorted this out by, all by itself.
    This both gave a nice and even camber, plus that it prevented any hooked leech to develop  -  just like that  -   by accident! If I had made a gaff sail of that size, with that webbing at the leech, it surely would have ended with a hooked leech.

    As it is, I feel no need to add Bermudan-style battens between the JR battens.

    Arne


    (Full size diagram at Member’s album, Arne’s sketches, section 7)


  • 05 Feb 2024 11:17
    Reply # 13310616 on 13310612
    Anonymous wrote:

    Yes, and is my sail made of polyester, dacron or Terylene?

    That's easy. Dacron (Dupont de Nemours Inc.) and Terylene (ICI PLC) are the two original and best known brand names (there are now many others) for the very basic extruded polyester fibres:

    {Polyester fiber is a “manufactured fiber in which the fiber forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed at least 85% by weight of an ester of a dihydric alcohol (HOROH) and terephthalic acid (p-HOOC-C6H4COOH)”. The most widely used polyester fiber is made from the linear polymer poly (ethylene terephtalate)}

    that (among many different applications) were then spun into yarn, that was then woven into cloth/fabric/canvas of many different types for many different end uses - one of which was for making sails.

    Last modified: 05 Feb 2024 12:54 | Anonymous member
  • 05 Feb 2024 10:56
    Reply # 13310612 on 869421

    Yes, and is my sail made of polyester, dacron or Terylene?

    Last modified: 05 Feb 2024 11:01 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Feb 2024 23:58
    Reply # 13310496 on 869421

    So it's great that there are so many drawings and photos. Some people believe that the language of sailors is universal, but the language of pictures is more understandable... (provided, of course,  in my case, that they are not Chinese/other pictograms).

    Last modified: 05 Feb 2024 00:59 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Feb 2024 22:31
    Reply # 13310467 on 869421
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Jan: 製作船帆的材料

    (that's what good uncle google told me)

    That says: "material for making boat sails out of". Chinese is usually more succinct, often quite rudimentary, since it is not such a hybrid as English. In Chinese you can simply say 帆布 (fānbù) a compound word which literally means "sail cloth". Typically, quite precise. My dictionary translates that back into English as "canvas", which is not so precise.

    Arne writes good English, sometimes with a "Norwegian accent" so I used Uncle Google too, and looked it up in Norwegian. However, his use of "canvas" does not seem to be an example of Norwegian accent. The nearest I could find is, like the Chinese, (and unlike English) very logical: “seilduk”  - is that right Arne? 

    (Makes me think of "duck", which I am old enough to remember, but always found puzzling, so I looked up the meaning and origin of "duck", as well.)

    For the record, in Chapter 5 the word "canvas" appears 11 times, all quite correctly I think. There are seven instances of "cloth". There are places where "fabric" might have been an option. But there are also 10 instances where Arne has made his familiar mark on the English language by simply inventing his own compound word: "sailcloth". 

    You will also find other useful improvisations such as "hotknife" and "sailplan". Arne complains that we English speakers are inconsistent, because we do that sometimes, and other times, for some unknown reason, we don't. (That's right Arne - and sometimes, like, for example another one of yours: "backside", better not to.)

    Well, in the case of "canvas" maybe we should. Perhaps, these days, "sailcloth" (just like  帆布, or seilduk), might be a better word?







    Last modified: 05 Feb 2024 07:48 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
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