Search, rescue and survival

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  • 19 Jan 2020 13:39
    Reply # 8619715 on 8567997

    James,

    I agree, there are some vaguenesses in the PDF. I suspect that they mean that nav lights etc are mandatory to comply with COLREGS rather than SOLAS V. Yes, the firefighting equipment is only mandatory on inland waters, but I wouldn't want to be without an extinguisher in any case.

    That type of foghorn is excellent. Makes a very loud noise, emanating from both ends of it, with only a light puff into the hole in the side. Can those instruments of war claim to be similarly bi-directional, without the drone?

    Last modified: 19 Jan 2020 13:45 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Jan 2020 13:29
    Reply # 8619634 on 8619359
    David wrote:

    (snip)

    The other mandatory items are nav lights, day shape (anchor ball), sound signalling equipment, firefighting equipment. No argument from me with any of that.

    Are you sure about that?  I know the RYA list them as mandatory in the PDF you linked, but elsewhere they say "For Pleasure Vessels of less than 13.7 metres in length there are no statutory requirements for safety equipment other than those required under SOLAS V." (ie radar reflector and list of signals).

    I'm deliberately being picky because the RYA are being far from clear.  The link to nav lights points to a page that doesn't exist on their site.  The link to fire fighting equipment points to the Boat Safety Scheme, which is solely for inland waterways.

    I like the lack of regulation in the UK that gives us the responsibility for our own safety.  I get annoyed when organisations like the RYA try to claim there is more regulation than there is. 

    Rant over (and it's a rant at the RYA, not you David!)

    ps I see your sound signalling equipment.  I have been known to carry one of these on Black Sheep, but I need to disable the bass drone to comply with Annex III of colregs...

  • 19 Jan 2020 12:41
    Reply # 8619359 on 8567997

    This topic has got me reviewing the Mandatory, Recommended and Discretionary items that I should carry aboard, and I now have on order an inflatable Echomax radar reflector

    There's no way at all that I want to be encumbered with a radar reflector in clear fine weather, but it's mandatory to have one aboard, and I might be glad of one if I find myself in thick weather in a shipping lane. An inflatable one that spends most of its life in a pouch seems to fill the bill.

    The other mandatory items are nav lights, day shape (anchor ball), sound signalling equipment, firefighting equipment. No argument from me with any of that.

  • 19 Jan 2020 12:26
    Reply # 8619258 on 8583176
    Annie wrote:
    David wrote: That is unless one is in a boat of 6 meters or less in which case everyone must wear an approved life jacket whilst the vessel is underway. If you are in a vessel of 6.1 meters in length, or more, there is no need to wear the life jacket, so perhaps that extra .1 of a meter renders the vessel safe?! 
    Which means, of course, that Shane Acton, who sailed one and a half times around the world in the 18'4"/5.6m Shrimpy, would have had to wear his life jacket all the time he was sailing, even if he was having a quick snooze on his bunk!  John Guzzwell,on the other hand, would be OK in Trekka.  Of course, some local councils say you must wear the life jacket at all times, which would mean that poor Shane could never take his off.
    Countries are quite entitled to make regulations about how vessels are to conduct themselves - but only within their own territorial waters. Once a vessel passes the 12 mile line into international waters, the high seas, those regulations no longer apply. Shane could have taken off his lifejacket and heaved a sigh a of relief as he left NZ waters. In UK waters, the wearing of a lifejacket would have been at his discretion. I almost never wear mine aboard Weaverbird (but wear a safety belt and tether when appropriate), but almost always wear it in the kayak.
  • 17 Jan 2020 20:08
    Reply # 8603868 on 8567997

    Careful with expired flares. A fellow I sailed with sustained bad burns to his hand when an expired flare simply vomited its inflammable contents upon ignition.

  • 16 Jan 2020 08:48
    Reply # 8588941 on 8588213
    Anonymous wrote:

    A few days ago a 15 m sailboat was in trouble on the south coast of Britanny after crossing the golfe de Gascogne, with no electricity for the chart plotter, the vhf, and no means of communication until they can phone near shore. They were wrong of 23 miles with their position, and they have been locating only after firing their flares.

    Why they don't have an EPIRB, or why they don't use the GPS on their phone, I don't know, but in this situation the flares were useful.

    link


    Sounds as of they were very ill prepared to me. Flares are all very good if someone os nearby to see them. New Zealand has some very isolated coastlines, and do many parts of the world so depending only on flares for rescue is leaving a lot to 'chance'.
  • 16 Jan 2020 07:04
    Reply # 8588213 on 8567997

    A few days ago a 15 m sailboat was in trouble on the south coast of Britanny after crossing the golfe de Gascogne, with no electricity for the chart plotter, the vhf, and no means of communication until they can phone near shore. They were wrong of 23 miles with their position, and they have been locating only after firing their flares.

    Why they don't have an EPIRB, or why they don't use the GPS on their phone, I don't know, but in this situation the flares were useful.

    link


  • 15 Jan 2020 21:10
    Reply # 8583967 on 8567997
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The same goes for Norway.
    A few years back, our Storting (Parliament) decided that anyone in boats shorter than 8.0m LOA must wear flotation gear when the boats are under way.
    It is sooo easy to produce laws that don’t cost the lawmakers a penny...

    Arne


  • 15 Jan 2020 19:22
    Reply # 8583176 on 8578162
    David wrote: That is unless one is in a boat of 6 meters or less in which case everyone must wear an approved life jacket whilst the vessel is underway. If you are in a vessel of 6.1 meters in length, or more, there is no need to wear the life jacket, so perhaps that extra .1 of a meter renders the vessel safe?! 
    Which means, of course, that Shane Acton, who sailed one and a half times around the world in the 18'4"/5.6m Shrimpy, would have had to wear his life jacket all the timehe was sailing, even if he was having a quick snooze on his bunk!  John Guzzwell,on the other hand, would be OK in Trekka.  Of course, some local councils say you must wear the life jacket at all times, which would mean that poor Shane could never take his off.
    Last modified: 15 Jan 2020 19:24 | Anonymous member
  • 15 Jan 2020 09:07
    Reply # 8578591 on 8567997

    Thank goodness things are a bit more sensibly regulated in the UK.

    https://www.rya.org.uk/knowledge-advice/safe-boating/keep-in-touch/Pages/calling-for-help.aspx

    "Modern technology provides safer and more reliable options for distress alerting than flares, and presuming such technology is carried aboard a pleasure vessel, the owner may now wish to consider reducing their complement of flares."

    "It is now possible for a pleasure vessel under 13.7m (which is not by law required to carry flares) to be equipped for distress alerting without carrying traditional pyrotechnic flares. An alerting device listed in COLREG such as EPIRB (ideally with GPS and a homing device) or DSC marine radio set (correctly connected to the GPS) which is suitable for the intended area of operation together with some form of EVDS for location in the final mile may be a suitable combination."

    https://www.rya.org.uk/SiteCollectionDocuments/cruising/Web%20Documents/Regulations%20and%20Safety/Distress-Alerting-Info-Sheet.pdf

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/437161/74531_Solas_V_MCA098_100714_Ver1.pdf

    (which says that I should carry a radar reflector "if practicable". Nothing else).

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