Wood stove in a Badger

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  • 09 Apr 2020 17:55
    Reply # 8889913 on 8528550

    I found a very good video on installing the next size up wood stove to my Mini Cub by a very experienced couple the Childress's.  It's 32 mins but good stuff on cutting holes in cored decks etc.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PuUYSUITc_A&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0viPkZYY_miPcZd4z0YU-p24tSL2iv_k2M9LTSJJ7bBq0hXwfpf34bqjg

  • 12 Jan 2020 17:52
    Reply # 8553341 on 8528550

    Thanks David Tyler, I will have to mock it up and see.  Good idea the athwartship poles as that is the direction you "fall" from when passing.

    Also does anyone have a suggestion for the best "hat" on the top outside?  Balancing best drawing top with obstruction to fore sheets as its right there.

    I don't think the "H" would work due to tangles.

    Thanks, 

    David.

  • 12 Jan 2020 17:12
    Reply # 8553089 on 8528550

    This photo of Tystie (kindly sent to me by the current owner, Gordon) may be of interest. It's a Dickinson diesel heater that the flue is attached to, not a wood burner, but if you look closely there are two 1 inch stainless steel tubes, cabin sole to deckhead, athwart the flue. There is also a heat shield, mainly to protect the table rather than the crew. I believe that this athwartships, rather than forward or aft, position for the grab posts makes it less easy and less instinctive to grab the flue as you pass by.

  • 12 Jan 2020 16:51
    Reply # 8552969 on 8549413
    Anonymous wrote:

    We found that the heater in the saloon, forward of the mast worked just fine.  Neither Pete nor I ever burned ourselves on it, but then, there were plenty of other things to grab hold of. If you are worried about this, you can use heat shields on both stove and chimney, but you do lose quite a lot of radiated heat this way.  I admit that people would come down and, in spite of our saying "The chimney is hot, don't get hold of it", promptly do so.  With a great big mast not far behind it and a bulkhead-to-deckhead grab pole conveniently to hand, it was a source of astonishment that people seemed so attracted to it.

    If you are worried about visitors doing this, fit the heat shields, but the heater down at floor level is a blessing on cold, wet days: it is a positive delight to watch the moisture drying on the cabin sole within minutes of the fire being lit.


    Hmmmmm thanks for this Annie, that put the cat amongst the pigeons.  I'll wait til I get the boat trucked down and review the space available and see whether this interrupts the floor bilge access.

    Thanks for sharing your first hand knowledge.





  • 12 Jan 2020 06:19
    Reply # 8549413 on 8528550

    We found that the heater in the saloon, forward of the mast worked just fine.  Neither Pete nor I ever burned ourselves on it, but then, there were plenty of other things to grab hold of. If you are worried about this, you can use heat shields on both stove and chimney, but you do lose quite a lot of radiated heat this way.  I admit that people would come down and, in spite of our saying "The chimney is hot, don't get hold of it", promptly do so.  With a great big mast not far behind it and a bulkhead-to-deckhead grab pole conveniently to hand, it was a source of astonishment that people seemed so attracted to it.

    If you are worried about visitors doing this, fit the heat shields, but the heater down at floor level is a blessing on cold, wet days: it is a positive delight to watch the moisture drying on the cabin sole within minutes of the fire being lit.


  • 12 Jan 2020 00:59
    Reply # 8547574 on 8547317
    Anonymous wrote:

    has anyone used a rocket stove, easy to make in any size , very efficient?


    Rocket stove? or rocket mass heater? That is, would this be used for cooking or heating? For cooking, The rocket stove is much more efficient than an open camp fire or perhaps a little better than the standard wood stove. The rocket stove for cooking is generally too small to achieve the same full burn as the rocket mass heater though it is much cleaner than the campfire much of the world cooks on (indoors) it is not safe for a small space with little ventilation. It's main use is in houses with no door or with a "range hood" to evacuate the fumes. For boat (and camping) use there are a number of very small gasifier stoves which achieve the same thing in a smaller space with even less smoke (that is more efficiently). The main problem with both of these things is that they are made to be used out doors or with open doors such that you may as well be out doors. I have seen only one rocket cooker with a flu to take exhaust outside but it was mainly useful for cooking stew for a hundred people at a time.

    The rocket mass heater on the other hand, is probably too big (and heavy) for marine use. Think of adding a 45 gallon (imperial gallon = 55 US gallons) barrel to your interior along with 30 feet of pipe covered with mud (two tons of mud even when dry). They are one of the most efficient wood burners around and there would be no smoke to alarm marina staff and send you away for burning wood. But I don't think too many people have the space for this kind of thing, That is I don't think too many of the people here have over 100 foot boats to play with.

  • 12 Jan 2020 00:09
    Reply # 8547317 on 8528550
    Deleted user

    has anyone used a rocket stove, easy to make in any size , very efficient?

  • 10 Jan 2020 22:58
    Reply # 8538377 on 8528550

    David T, sure wish we had bark like that here in New England – sounds tremendous.

    David D, I'll bet that the Cub will be just great. The only major difference with the Grizzly is that the Grizzly actually has a possibility of holding a fire through the night, if things are all just perfect.

    In the Benco stove on Auklet I've been using "real wood charcoal" (not briquettes) which is sold in 7 pound bags, intended for higher end grilling. This is because that stove was designed for that kind of charcoal, and it's quite convenient for stowing enough for months. It helps to put it into ziploc bags, which keeps it from soaking up moisture from the air. We got a lot of it a few years ago, because it was on sale and I was planning substantial trips. We got a whole pallet… Which still has several bags left. I'm pretty sure this was from Home Depot – it's definitely available as a general thing, here in New England. It might even have come from Whole Foods. I think that the Cubic Mini materials say somewhere that one is not supposed to burn charcoal in them. I'm thinking that this must be because it burns hotter than wood? Seems to me that with attention to not letting things burn over hot it should be fine. Of course, that's not advice! But it is what I plan to do. We've just been burning wood, in cute little 6 inch pieces, in the tiny house stove.

    As for the stove pipe top, it's a bit of a puzzle. On the tiny house we already had a regular stove pipe top, on 6 inch pipe that had already been fitted to the roof. I've gotten a "tin hat" top for the stove pipe for the boat. I've had ideas about making a sheet-metal shield with holes, to put around the area below the hat, so that it's more rain/spray-resistant, like a proper Charlie Noble. For the moment it's all pretty experimental. I did order the stove pipe sold by the stove company specifically for these stoves. Because of positioning issues in the tiny house we could not do that, and had some significant frustration trying to work out the pipe/stove connection and elbows. It's much, much better if you can go straight up from the stove with no bends. Then you can use the stuff that definitely fits, that engages cleanly with the 3" stove collar. This also works with the two sizes of double wall pipe, one inside the other, that they recommend for passing through the cabintop. All of this is not yet installed on the new boat – the stove and various pieces just arrived yesterday and today actually.

    I'm sure you're right that Annie will have thoughts about Badger stove positioning. This weekend is the big junket in New Zealand, so I expect she's occupied at the moment!

  • 10 Jan 2020 15:39
    Reply # 8535341 on 8528550

    In British Columbia a wood burning stove is a no-brainer, if you live there. As far as I remember, the locals ignore the huge amounts of actual wood on the beach, in favour of Douglas Fir bark, if they can find it. It's thick and dense, comes in handy sized chunks and burns more like good quality coal than wood.

  • 10 Jan 2020 14:50
    Reply # 8534930 on 8528550

    Hi Shemaya, great you are familiar with the brand.  That's reassuring!  The smaller Cub comes with the boat just not fitted and I think thats a fine size for now.

    Leaning towards bulkhead mount.  A safety/ drying frame in the boat center would take a lot of space.  I am curious to hear from Annie as I think Badger had a central stove.

    It also puts the chimney away from the fore sheets though more prone to bumping when launching dinghy.

    What kind or chimney top have you found works?

    And while foraging for wood on a cruise could be fun (cutting it all into 5.5 inch pieces!) what fuel do you use that I could lay in before leaving civilization?  Can one buy bulk charcoal or coal etc in New England?

    David.

    Last modified: 10 Jan 2020 14:51 | Anonymous member
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