Drying out

  • 07 Jun 2019 13:40
    Reply # 7563431 on 7559295

    Way back in the early '70s, my first cruiser, 23ft with a long keel, had bolt on legs. They worked well enough on hard ground with flat water, but I wouldn't have rigged them if there was any scend. I don't remember trying to use them on soft mud. The crucial point is that their draught absolutely must be a few inches less than that of the keel, so that under no circumstances are they carrying the weight of the boat. Long keel boats will sometimes dry out upright on the flat width of their keel, on hard ground, which is dangerous (you hardly dare to breathe until the tide comes in again!), but demonstrates that very little in the way of support is needed to keep them upright, so long as they are upright to start with, and not at a small angle of heel. On very soft mud, I wouldn't be overly concerned. But to answer the initial question, stayed or unstayed, the mast will look after itself.

    Last modified: 07 Jun 2019 13:46 | Anonymous member
  • 07 Jun 2019 00:20
    Reply # 7562352 on 7559295

    Steve, how deep and soft is the mud? A folkboat would only need to sink down a foot or so into the mud and it would be on its garboards and stable enough to sit upright or just heel a little. 

    Depending on the mud, your moderate long keel may prove to be an advantage.

    I have been fooling around on the edge of a soft muddy tidal creek for nigh on fifty years, with fin keel, round-bilge centreboarder, moderate long keel, and flat bottom (no keel at all).  In deep mud, the fin keeler sat bolt upright. The round-bilge centreboarder was hopeless on the edge of the creek, heeling alarmingly and acceptable only on level mud out of reach in the middle of the creek. The moderate long keel (in which I currently live) sits up very well on sloping mud at the side of the creek and with a little training has dug a hole for itself into which it obediently returns with each tide. The flat bottom scow, which I thought would be ideal, is not really ideal in the creek.  However it is tied to the bank, it always insisted on slithering down the slope and taking up residence in the centre of the creek and would never learn to stay close to one side. (It sits up perfectly on a level mud bank, of course.)

    I have often wondered about the use of legs, for sitting up on firm ground - but legs are not commonly used here and I don't have any experience of them.

    I agree with Annie and can't see the mast ever being a problem in any case.

    Last modified: 07 Jun 2019 01:14 | Anonymous member
  • 06 Jun 2019 22:48
    Reply # 7562251 on 7559295
    i all, this is my first posting and I am planning on converting a boat to junk rig starting next year when I have retired. This will be a project where I will have to carefully watch the costs. I may possibly be able to secure a Folksong hull for a very nominal sum; the Folksong is a Folkboat inspired boat and this one has yet to be fitted out fully and has never seen water except a bit of rain this year. My potential problem is that the boat has a long keel and it would be kept on a drying mooring. Luckily the bottom is soft mud but the boat will heel over considerably when the tide is out. Do you think that this would cause problems with an un-stayed mast? 

    Thanks in anticipation,

    Steve

    Hi Steve

    Well, you're a lucky man: you have the example of a great rig to copy from Arne!

    I would suggest that if the unstayed mast can cope with the pressure of a sail on it, heeling hard going to windward, it should have no problems naked on a dried-out boat.  Of course, if the mud is very soft, the boat won't heel over that far, anyway.  Certainly, on the occasions when I have dried out inadvertently, the mast was the least of my worries!

  • 06 Jun 2019 13:28
    Message # 7559295

    Hi all, this is my first posting and I am planning on converting a boat to junk rig starting next year when I have retired. This will be a project where I will have to carefully watch the costs. I may possibly be able to secure a Folksong hull for a very nominal sum; the Folksong is a Folkboat inspired boat and this one has yet to be fitted out fully and has never seen water except a bit of rain this year. My potential problem is that the boat has a long keel and it would be kept on a drying mooring. Luckily the bottom is soft mud but the boat will heel over considerably when the tide is out. Do you think that this would cause problems with an un-stayed mast? 

    Thanks in anticipation,

    Steve

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software