S2 6.7 Junk Rig Conversion

  • 25 Nov 2018 14:53
    Reply # 6931571 on 6931326
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    All four patterns are now lofted on painters paper including the rounding.

    Making one seam and pocket sounds like a good idea. I think I will need to get some seatbelt webbing first.

    It seems like the Swela Outguard that Jami used might not be available in the US. Does anyone know if there is a similar fabric available in my part of the world?

    The webbing only comes on after the sail has been assembled, so you can just as well start with cutting out a couple of panels, now that you have the patterns. Personally I join one panel to the next (after hemming luff and leech) as soon as it has been cut out. I like to see that all is well before I cut out the next panel...

    Thank you. I will keep that in mind. I intend to follow the construction methods in TCPJR book as closely as I can. I was thinking to make a small one-yard size panel just to make sure my 1970s Kenmore sewing machine can sew through the webbing and several layers of cloth before placing the big cloth order.

  • 25 Nov 2018 08:27
    Reply # 6931326 on 6931067
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:

    All four patterns are now lofted on painters paper including the rounding.

    Making one seam and pocket sounds like a good idea. I think I will need to get some seatbelt webbing first.

    It seems like the Swela Outguard that Jami used might not be available in the US. Does anyone know if there is a similar fabric available in my part of the world?


    The webbing only comes on after the sail has been assembled, so you can just as well start with cutting out a couple of panels, now that you have the patterns. Personally I join one panel to the next (after hemming luff and leech) as soon as it has been cut out. I like to see that all is well before I cut out the next panel...

    Arne

  • 25 Nov 2018 01:02
    Reply # 6931067 on 6872873

    All four patterns are now lofted on painters paper including the rounding.

    Making one seam and pocket sounds like a good idea. I think I will need to get some seatbelt webbing first.

    It seems like the Swela Outguard that Jami used might not be available in the US. Does anyone know if there is a similar fabric available in my part of the world?

    Last modified: 25 Nov 2018 01:03 | Anonymous member
  • 21 Nov 2018 15:10
    Reply # 6923227 on 6872873

    I suggest you make up a short length of the seam between panels + batten pocket, and a short length of luff and leech tabling, using the same methods as you plan to use on the sail

  • 21 Nov 2018 14:29
    Reply # 6922769 on 6872873

    Got the top panel pattern drawn yesterday -- except the rounding. I hope to get that done shortly. Then only one more pattern to go! I am realizing now that the first, lowest, pattern I made is likely the most critical to get 'right'. I need to go back and check all the measurements on that again. With my cheap protractor the rise looks a lot closer to 9 degrees than 10 degrees.

    I ordered small sample swatches for several different fabrics and also two yards of the POLYESTER RIPSTOP (DWR) - 2.6 OZ. I am not totally sure what I am going to do other than pull on them to see how they 'feel' and then maybe check that my sewing machine can stitch through several layers.

  • 20 Nov 2018 21:25
    Reply # 6916379 on 6872873

    That ripstop looks worth a trial, at least. Can you get a yard or two to sew a test seam?

  • 20 Nov 2018 16:15
    Reply # 6915943 on 6872873
    This POLYESTER RIPSTOP (DWR) - 2.6 OZ is the closest thing I have been able to find to the ' 92 gm/sq m/2.7 oz sq yd textured ripstop polyester from Pennine Outdoor' (broken link now) that David T. first mentioned and that Jami J. decided to use.

    I think Jami's boat and type of sailing are very similar to my own. I would like to find a fabric similar to what Jami used.

    Last modified: 20 Nov 2018 21:46 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Nov 2018 21:10
    Reply # 6914741 on 6872873

    I just now found the lengthy discussion from when Jami was deciding on a fabric. I will be sure to read through this thread.

  • 19 Nov 2018 08:39
    Reply # 6913627 on 6913221
    Scott wrote:

    David, 

    Thank you for the suggestion to use load-spreading patches with the Odyssey material. If I understood correctly this would mean only two triangular patches. One in the upper most panel all the way aft (peak) and one in the upper most panel all the way forward (throat). Is my understanding of the throat and peak correct? I have to say that describing the material as having a 'high proportion of filler' is making me rethink using this as sail cloth. I am interested to know what cloth you personally recommend for a 22 sq ft sail.

    Your understanding is correct. But use more than one patch in each place - two or three is usual at points of high stress, smaller patch first, then larger on top.

    The conventional choice will always be polyester sailcloth, which after all's said and done is made for the job in hand. 4 -5 oz would be right for your boat. Most of them only come in 36in width, which is inconvenient if you want to get a whole panel out of one cloth. Boring white is available in 58in width. 4 oz in sailmaker's measure = 5 oz/sq yd. Sailmaker's measure means one yard of length at 28.5in wide - don't ask why, the reason is lost in the mists of time.

    But we're not conventional, and there's a point in making junk sails from soft UV resistant cloth. These are heavier than 4 oz, but I don't have any problem with that - I'm using 9 oz/sq yd cloth on Weaverbird. Weathermax 80 is still a front runner, if you can work around its tendency to pucker when sewn along its length. That's easy if cutting a barrel-cut 2D panel lengthwise from one cloth, as the only sewing is along the batten seam, and puckering is actually good, as it gathers up some unwanted excess of length in the edge. 

  • 19 Nov 2018 00:32
    Reply # 6913221 on 6872873

    David, 

    Thank you for the suggestion to use load-spreading patches with the Odyssey material. If I understood correctly this would mean only two triangular patches. One in the upper most panel all the way aft (peak) and one in the upper most panel all the way forward (throat). Is my understanding of the throat and peak correct? I have to say that describing the material as having a 'high proportion of filler' is making me rethink using this as sail cloth. I am interested to know what cloth you personally recommend for a 22 sq ft sail.

    Arne,

    From what I gather you have ripstop nylon in mind. I like the idea of avoiding UV damage issues by making the sail out of a protective cover like Odyssey. On the other hand this might not be such an important feature when I am only sailing a short part of the year. I have not been able to find the specific weight of the cloth that you have used. On sailrite I see 0.5 oz and 0.75 oz and 1.5 oz ripstop nylon. Just to keep it interesting these weights are 'per sailmakers yard'. I guess this is one yard of the 60" wide material? I am interested to know what your choice would be for a 22 sq ft sail as well.

    It is hard for me to know when it is time to stop and think before moving forward with this project and when it is best to make a decision and keep going. I would like to make this the best sail I can make and feel good about the results so I do not want to rush too much. On the other hand it seems like I could spend years just thinking about what cloth to use.

    Edit: This Silpoly fabric looks very interesting to me. It is polyester. It has a ripstop weave. The specs claim lower water absorption and increased UV resistance compared to ripstop nylon. It is lighter than Odyssey and it is coated on both sides. Does anyone have experience with this fabric?

    Last modified: 19 Nov 2018 02:19 | Anonymous member
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software