S2 6.7 Junk Rig Conversion

  • 28 Nov 2018 06:49
    Reply # 6935959 on 6872873

    I'm afraid I'd have to agree with Asmat, at least from a New Zealand perspective.  Quite a few of us have found that the fabric doesn't seem to like the sun very much and, in my own opinion, will start to come apart if only moderately loaded.  I wouldn't use it again, but Arne seems to have been very happy with it.  Although I didn't feel that my sail failed because of sun damage, considering Arne's success, it is the only sensible conclusion to draw.

  • 27 Nov 2018 21:35
    Reply # 6935419 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Asmat,
    I would not blame the sailcloth here. To me it appears that the boltrope at the leech has been way too weak, or even non-existing. This has pulled the shape out of the panels, in particular on the upper ones, where the loads are highest. I once wrote a note on that when I discovered that the webbing for my Johanna’s sail stretched too much. The remedy was to hand-stitch on a second boltrope (a length of old halyard.).

    Arne


    Last modified: 27 Nov 2018 21:36 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 27 Nov 2018 16:57
    Reply # 6934974 on 6872873

    I wouldn't use odyssey for a cruising boat. The photos attached show a sail made of odyssey3 in 2011 and under new ownership a year later.

    Sorry, can't flip the 2011 picture right way up.


    2 files
    Last modified: 27 Nov 2018 17:01 | Anonymous member
  • 27 Nov 2018 14:08
    Reply # 6934708 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Scott,
    there is a trap which is easy to fall in  -  the paralysing fear of making something which isn’t perfect.

    Relax, most cloths that are rot-proof and wind-tight will do. If Odyssey can be had at a reasonable price, then go for it. The sail will come out at about 7kg. It is on the stout side, but on the other hand, it will stand quite brutal handling and resist some chafe. Besides, it sews very well without pucking (at least on my machine).

    Arne

    (.. playing in the cheap, available and good enough league...)


  • 26 Nov 2018 19:53
    Reply # 6933427 on 6933250
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    I ordered small sample swatches for several different fabrics and also two yards of the POLYESTER RIPSTOP (DWR) - 2.6 OZ. I am not totally sure what I am going to do other than pull on them to see how they 'feel' and then maybe check that my sewing machine can stitch through several layers.

    Here are my findings for lightweight cloth...think parachute, kites, hot air ballons:

    A, B, C

    Turns out your linked source above beats them all.

    rself

    Thank you for the reply and the links to lightweight fabric. In your profile I see that you are using Odyssey III for your sail. Do you have any experience using lighter cloth for a junk rig sail? It seems like everyone is using Odyssey or an even heavier fabric.

    Last modified: 26 Nov 2018 19:54 | Anonymous member
  • 26 Nov 2018 18:18
    Reply # 6933250 on 6922769
    Anonymous wrote:

    I ordered small sample swatches for several different fabrics and also two yards of the POLYESTER RIPSTOP (DWR) - 2.6 OZ. I am not totally sure what I am going to do other than pull on them to see how they 'feel' and then maybe check that my sewing machine can stitch through several layers.

    Here are my findings for lightweight cloth...think parachute, kites, hot air ballons:

    A, B, C

    Turns out your linked source above beats them all.

    rself

    Last modified: 26 Nov 2018 18:19 | Anonymous member
  • 25 Nov 2018 14:53
    Reply # 6931571 on 6931326
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    All four patterns are now lofted on painters paper including the rounding.

    Making one seam and pocket sounds like a good idea. I think I will need to get some seatbelt webbing first.

    It seems like the Swela Outguard that Jami used might not be available in the US. Does anyone know if there is a similar fabric available in my part of the world?

    The webbing only comes on after the sail has been assembled, so you can just as well start with cutting out a couple of panels, now that you have the patterns. Personally I join one panel to the next (after hemming luff and leech) as soon as it has been cut out. I like to see that all is well before I cut out the next panel...

    Thank you. I will keep that in mind. I intend to follow the construction methods in TCPJR book as closely as I can. I was thinking to make a small one-yard size panel just to make sure my 1970s Kenmore sewing machine can sew through the webbing and several layers of cloth before placing the big cloth order.

  • 25 Nov 2018 08:27
    Reply # 6931326 on 6931067
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:

    All four patterns are now lofted on painters paper including the rounding.

    Making one seam and pocket sounds like a good idea. I think I will need to get some seatbelt webbing first.

    It seems like the Swela Outguard that Jami used might not be available in the US. Does anyone know if there is a similar fabric available in my part of the world?


    The webbing only comes on after the sail has been assembled, so you can just as well start with cutting out a couple of panels, now that you have the patterns. Personally I join one panel to the next (after hemming luff and leech) as soon as it has been cut out. I like to see that all is well before I cut out the next panel...

    Arne

  • 25 Nov 2018 01:02
    Reply # 6931067 on 6872873

    All four patterns are now lofted on painters paper including the rounding.

    Making one seam and pocket sounds like a good idea. I think I will need to get some seatbelt webbing first.

    It seems like the Swela Outguard that Jami used might not be available in the US. Does anyone know if there is a similar fabric available in my part of the world?

    Last modified: 25 Nov 2018 01:03 | Anonymous member
  • 21 Nov 2018 15:10
    Reply # 6923227 on 6872873

    I suggest you make up a short length of the seam between panels + batten pocket, and a short length of luff and leech tabling, using the same methods as you plan to use on the sail

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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