Daisy Mae resto-mod build

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  • 21 Jul 2020 00:35
    Reply # 9115138 on 6315683

    Floor is out. Now its rot busting time.

    1 file
  • 17 Jul 2020 01:20
    Reply # 9107343 on 6315683

    I'm wishing you luck.

    Keep up the reports, its an interesting boat.

  • 10 Jul 2020 02:54
    Reply # 9092048 on 6315683

    I am returning to the boat in a few days! I have a crew of helpers to work on the boat too! Wish me luck!

  • 24 Apr 2020 08:01
    Reply # 8925251 on 8924913
    James wrote:

    I am looking for stove suggestions. I am using the same galley plan as badger. Recomedations? I was looking at a taylor.but they cost so much more then a propane camp stove and a couple 20lbs cylinder setup. What do.you use today?


    James, I'm copying this query over to our "galley" topic (which I recommend that you read through), so that we keep things tidy and searchable.
  • 24 Apr 2020 01:50
    Reply # 8924973 on 6315683

    I’ll throw this out to the stove aficionados, because I have to admit to being too lazy, so far, to move beyond using a gas stove, which have done for many years. (Not counting donkey's years ago when we used to use the old primus and optimus kero stoves – and an interesting incident when I was on board a fishing boat which caught fire at sea due to a fault in the methylated spirit stove – fortunately the skipper was an ex-fireman who handled the situation rather coolly and carried the blazing stove out of the cabin before too much of the deckhead had already burned.)

    The point I want to make is that I would be a bit hesitant about using a propane camping stove. Camping stoves invariably come with a warning that they should be used only in well-ventilated situations (like a tent, I suppose) which a boat is not. A proper marine gas stove, usually quite a lot more expensive, comes with a heat sensing device which automatically shuts off the gas supply if the flame is accidentally blown out. I have always assumed that this makes a gas stove a little safer (or should I say, a little less unsafe). I have never seen any testing done and don’t know how reliable they are, but a marine stove with this little device might be worth the extra money, James, if you are thinking of a gas stove.

    I would like to hear from someone who knows a bit about the subject, on this particular “safety” device. I think its that little thing on the left of the burner, I don’t even know what it is called.


  • 24 Apr 2020 01:22
    Reply # 8924913 on 6315683

    I am looking for stove suggestions. I am using the same galley plan as badger. Recomedations? I was looking at a taylor.but they cost so much more then a propane camp stove and a couple 20lbs cylinder setup. What do.you use today?

  • 15 Apr 2020 17:55
    Reply # 8901671 on 8332685
    Anonymous wrote:

    Its a pity we have't heard any more from James, I was hoping he might be able to persuade the original owner (of 40 years) to provide the life story of this vessel.

    My interest was sparked again when I read the centennial issue of the JRA magazine and saw the photographs of Mandarin Star.

    The two boats are remarkably similar. They are both about the same size, same oval transom, same details at the bow and same shaped cabin with the distinctive forward slope to the front. They are both said to have been built in Hong Kong. Mandarin Star was said to have been shipped to the UK and then later to the US. Daisy Mae was in the US.



    I am wondering if they are the same boat. Daisy Mae has a different arrangement of cabin windows, and a transom-mounted rudder, but these could easily have been later modifications.

    According to the article in JRA Newsletter #38 Mandarin Star was built in 1900. If this is true, and if Daisy Mae is the same boat, she could well be the oldest Chinese junk still in sailing condition. 

    James appears to be no longer a member. This is an appeal to James, Shyam, or anyone who knows the current situation regarding Mandarin Star or Daisy Mae.

    There's got to be an interesting story here.


    Edit

    I have just gone back to a previous thread here when Shyam had the boat and sold it to James. This thread has more photographs, and a hint from Shyam that the previous owner had more photos and was willing to tell the story. It also states that Daisy Mae was built in 1964 which does seem more likely than 1900. I am still intrigued at the very close resemblance between Daisy Mae and Mandarin Star. Are you still out there somewhere Shyam?


    My boat was sailed to DC sometime in the early 60s, from the info I have she was in the states by 1962. I have heard dates from the late 40s to early 60s for her construction. I know she was built in the HoSang boat yard in Hong Kong. The engine os a 1948 Hercules that I highly doubt is original equipment.

  • 14 Apr 2020 17:52
    Reply # 8899299 on 6315683

    Hello everyone. Sorry I have not been active lately. The boat should be back in the water come hell or high water in 2020. I. Have a lot of historical info and pics but I am saving it to do a proper write up when the boat is ready to cruise. Life has been hectic, but the boat is my top priority again.

    Last modified: 14 Apr 2020 17:54 | Anonymous member
  • 20 Dec 2019 02:46
    Reply # 8332685 on 6315683

    Its a pity we have't heard any more from James, I was hoping he might be able to persuade the original owner (of 40 years) to provide the life story of this vessel.

    My interest was sparked again when I read the centennial issue of the JRA magazine and saw the photographs of Mandarin Star.

    The two boats are remarkably similar. They are both about the same size, same oval transom, same details at the bow and same shaped cabin with the distinctive forward slope to the front. They are both said to have been built in Hong Kong. Mandarin Star was said to have been shipped to the UK and then later to the US. Daisy Mae was in the US.



    I am wondering if they are the same boat. Daisy Mae has a different arrangement of cabin windows, and a transom-mounted rudder, but these could easily have been later modifications.

    According to the article in JRA Newsletter #38 Mandarin Star was built in 1900. If this is true, and if Daisy Mae is the same boat, she could well be the oldest Chinese junk still in sailing condition. 

    James appears to be no longer a member. This is an appeal to James, Shyam, or anyone who knows the current situation regarding Mandarin Star or Daisy Mae.

    There's got to be an interesting story here.


    Edit

    I have just gone back to a previous thread here when Shyam had the boat and sold it to James. This thread has more photographs, and a hint from Shyam that the previous owner had more photos and was willing to tell the story. It also states that Daisy Mae was built in 1964 which does seem more likely than 1900. I am still intrigued at the very close resemblance between Daisy Mae and Mandarin Star. Are you still out there somewhere Shyam?

    Last modified: 20 Dec 2019 03:14 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Jan 2019 04:17
    Reply # 6982772 on 6315683

    Thanks for all the input. The project is moving way slower then I would like, but this venture is both an educational and healing journey. If anyone would like to come help me, I can house you in the cottage I am renting until the boat is splashed :)

    Last modified: 04 Jan 2019 04:17 | Anonymous member
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