SJR H28

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  • 05 Jul 2018 02:12
    Reply # 6360820 on 6316327

    Phew, that could make things easier then!

    I drew attention to the fact that the mast section would need to be circular so I assume that it is. I will go and look at it the moment my bermudan rig sells.


    Thanks again guys!

  • 04 Jul 2018 22:31
    Reply # 6360707 on 6316327

    David is quite right, but of course it might have been made for a gaffer. In which case, however, you would want to take a lot off the upper section to taper it.

    Yes, it would probably be heavy, but Arne has successfully used wooden spars on earlier boats. He also has a very good article in his stuff all about the wooden mast, which you might find useful. Highly recommended.

    While you re planning to sail around NZ, you're not planning to cross the Southern Ocean, so the mast needs to be strong, but not perhaps ultimate strength. Both Arne and Pete Hill reckon that PJR masts are about 10% more massive than necessary ...

  • 04 Jul 2018 20:25
    Reply # 6360529 on 6360525
    Anonymous wrote:A very helpful fellow at the Herald Island yacht club called me yesterday saying that there is a 12m solid oregon mast for sale at yacht spars in auckland for about a thousand dollars.

    My calculations using the PJR formula for a LAP of 8 and a SA of 37 indicate that a 20.5 cm diameter mast (23 minus 10% because it is solid) is sufficient. The mast in question is 19cm. 

    I intend on sailing round NZ in this boat, so heavy weather is expected. How important is that 1.5cm diameter...

    I am thinking that it would probably be pretty important but thought people with more experience than I could be more definitive. 

    The reason I ask is that it is a ready made, two pot painted mast, plug and play basically.


    It could be very heavy being solid. Is it of a round section, because a lot of timber masts were constructed of a rounded rectangular section? I can't see that a few millimetres is  going to make a big difference to strength. If in doubt you could laminate on some fiberglass unidirectionals in the partners area of the mast. Unidirectionals add a lot of stiffness to a structure.
    Last modified: 04 Jul 2018 22:33 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Jul 2018 20:19
    Reply # 6360525 on 6316327
    A very helpful fellow at the Herald Island yacht club called me yesterday saying that there is a 12m solid oregon mast for sale at yacht spars in auckland for about a thousand dollars.

    My calculations using the PJR formula for a LAP of 8 and a SA of 37 indicate that a 20.5 cm diameter mast (23 minus 10% because it is solid) is sufficient. The mast in question is 19cm. 

    I intend on sailing round NZ in this boat, so heavy weather is expected. How important is that 1.5cm diameter...

    I am thinking that it would probably be pretty important but thought people with more experience than I could be more definitive. 

    The reason I ask is that it is a ready made, two pot painted mast, plug and play basically.


  • 26 Jun 2018 20:19
    Reply # 6343992 on 6316327

    Haha! Yes I will be removing it asap! I had two others on the port side too but I cut the taps off and filled them with epoxy as a stand in until I haul her out. Certainly I will not be sailing her far while they remain fitted.

    Interesting about the extra weight forwards. Mine is riding high at the front since I emptied and removed the forward water tank. I will see how she floats after the new rig is fitted and consider my options. The forward area seems like a good spot for the spare anchors and chain.

    It would be interesting to race the H28 fleet with the new rig. Could be inspirational for some of them.

  • 26 Jun 2018 06:39
    Reply # 6342195 on 6316327

    I know of at least one New Zealand standard H28 which has circumnavigated the globe, and I know of another H28 glass hull with a timber deck and cabin which has spent more than the last decade cruising the Pacific. I expect there will others which have made offshore voyages, so they are capable vessels.

    Last modified: 26 Jun 2018 06:43 | Anonymous member
  • 25 Jun 2018 23:46
    Reply # 6341773 on 6316327

    The fibreglass H28 produced by Compass Yachts was the most popular production boat ever made in New Zealand with over 200 hulls coming out of the mould. Most of the boats were sold as hull and decks for owners to finish them off. Consequently every boat ended up looking different inside. As Graeme, said some had lead ballast but most had steel punchings mixed in with the resin and poured into the keel. A few have had problems with the steel rusting and bubbling through the hull. The fibreglass H28 was actually 30 feet on deck and as Annie said was quite different from the original wooden ketch. The H28's had an active owners association and they organised fleet racing. A boat called Sinbad usually came first. Everybody wondered why? Sinbad had lead ballast very far forward and went to windward so much better than the others. Once on the wind the others made huge leeway with their bows falling off every wave. Something to think about, Daniel.

    Rob

  • 25 Jun 2018 21:35
    Reply # 6341594 on 6316327

    I very much doubt that there was ever a boat launched that displaced the same (let alone less!) as the designer had intended/hoped.  Certainly, Fantail was closer to 3 than the 2.5 tons she was designed to be, and the marks for her designed waterline were at least 100mm below the one she had been floating on for years (judging by the many coats of antifouling that covered it.  And apart from the time that I owned her, she has spent her life as a weekend/holiday boat with pretty minimal gear on board.

    You can soon fit a ton of gear on board: anchor tackle (three anchors, 30 fathoms/50m of chain between them and then around 150m warp), mooring lines, spare rope, spare sails (if you have that sort of rig), 25 litres fuel for the engine, ditto for the cooker, 80 litres water, tins and containers of food, bosuns stores, tools: and judging from most boats, the owners regard an empty locker as a challenge that must be filled.  I think you are wise to assume the boat was at least 3.5 tons when launched and probably nudging 5 tons by the time you are kitted out for Milford.  When boats are launched their tanks are empty, they have a dinky piece of jewellery on the bow that is supposed to nail you to the bottom in F8 and even fenders are on the 'extra' list.  Thus and therefore, one has to assume that all the above come under 'personal stuff'.

    The Pelorus is significantly smaller and would obviously displace a bit less than an 'H28'.  (For non Kiwis, the boat that Daniel is talking about is considerably altered from the original and quite apart from being built of 'frozen snot' would be almost unrecognisable to LFH.)  The Pelorus's original rig was definitely that of a motor sailer, however, which is the main reason for the difference in sail area.

    I see that you certainly do have a self-destruct valve, Daniel.  I trust you are going to get rid of that terrifying and undoubtedly de-zincifying gate valve asap!  The first job I did on Fantail was to put her on a grid and get rid of the ones that she had been fitted with.  They gave me nightmares.

  • 25 Jun 2018 20:06
    Reply # 6341414 on 6316327

    I think I will get the biggest one that I can, 200mm by 5mm wall thickness. I intend to sail this boat to Milford Sound so beefier is better I think.

    I hacked out most of the plywood from the forward cabin. Just got a few stray planks to go.

    I will leave most of the storage there for now until I finalise the mast position and make the mast step.

    Sorry about the poor photo, it was taken at night. Since I removed the sink I now have a 'self destruct' valve in case I need to sink the boat in a hurry...


  • 25 Jun 2018 02:38
    Reply # 6339776 on 6316327

    Interesting. According to the original Half Moon Bay Brokerage (1975 Compass Yachts) brochure (found on the H28 Owners Assn. website) the displacement is 7,400 lb - hard to believe, I would have thought it a bit more than that.

    And the ballast is given as 4000 lb (a surprisingly high ballast ratio) though elsewhere it is also given as 3,500 lb. with reference to further trim ballast. Some of these had lead ballast and some had steel punchings in resin, I believe, so there is room for a little variation (and skepticism.)

    Anyway, if the displacement really is only 7,400 lb, that's 3,360 kg which is very little more than what I estimate my Pelorus to be.

    I would expect the H28 to be a bit stiffer than the Pelorus though, and one thing is for sure, the working sail area (quoted as 359 sq ft) is considerably more than Pelorus (estimated to be 286 sq ft) so Annie is right, its a "bigger boat" and I guess you will want to accept the advice from David. If you choose one of the stock Ullrich sections I will be interested to see which one you choose.

    (1,000 kg for "all my stuff" sounds a bit high! I would have trouble finding enough storage space for a tonne of personal stuff. My heaviest stuff is books and I have had to leave most of them ashore.)





    Last modified: 25 Jun 2018 04:25 | Anonymous member
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