LCB's (Le Canard Bleu) new sails.

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  • 23 Nov 2020 20:07
    Reply # 9382726 on 9379772
    Anonymous wrote:

    Lovely sails Pail, as expected. Looking forward to some photos which show the full 3-masted rig.

    It would be interesting to know a little more about the separate panels detail- is it similar to the detail on Roger T's Mingmng?


    Yes, looking forward to some photos that will show the whole boat and rig... they will come soon.

    I'm not familiar with how Roger did Mingming except that he used varying pocket sizes to induce some camber in his lower panels...

    I used separate panels to enable me to build a large main 580 SqFt in a small space. Then to keep things the same, I used separate panels for the foresail, if I had realised just how much work and effort would go into getting the rig together in a manner that satisfied me, I may well have decided to struggle on with a more normal method.

    If you go back to my first posting in this thread, you will find an number of detail photos showing the bits that I think will interest you. I'm happy to amplify on anything that attracts your interest.



  • 22 Nov 2020 04:34
    Reply # 9379772 on 9268694

    Lovely sails Pail, as expected. Looking forward to some photos which show the full 3-masted rig.

    It would be interesting to know a little more about the separate panels detail- is it similar to the detail on Roger T's Mingmng?

    Last modified: 22 Nov 2020 04:40 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Nov 2020 06:37
    Reply # 9374680 on 9268694

    Congratulations on a successful conversion. I look forward to seeing LCB's sails brightening up the local Kawau and Mahurangi horizon, and of course further afield for you. Seems like it has been a funny time with lots of us Kiwi Junkies, or Junk rig fans, working on alternative projects. I am looking forward to some very near future on-water gatherings.

    Last modified: 19 Nov 2020 06:48 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Nov 2020 03:59
    Reply # 9374563 on 9268694

    Some photos from my phone of the sails taken during the sea trials for LCB's  new sails.

    I think Marcus and Brian both agree that the rig change has been most successful. The 45° shelves have proved to be everything I hoped they would be. The sails inflate readily so that even at 6kts of wind the sails have taken their shape. This despite the relatively heavy weight of the Top Gun 9. Still takes about 15kts to get every crease out but only lighter cloth could change that.

    The day we managed to get out on, could not have been better. Starting off with a reach in 6kts before hardening to a beat and winds speeds into the twenties in the late afternoon.


    LCB proved even stiffer than I expected and we could carry the full main up to around 16kts I had expected to need to start reefing at 10kts or so of wind. She also turned in a very acceptable performance. We saw 3kts in 6kts of breeze to the windward and 8kts plus on a broad reach the following day in 16 - 25kts of wind.

    There are a few sheeting issues  to be sorted and it looks as if it will be possible to go to a single sheet on the main, but all in all, everything worked pretty much as expected. For which I am mightily relieved as the sails incorporate many new and untried ideas, not the least being the 45° shelves.

    A very real and heartfelt thank you to Brian Owen (also the PO) who spent many hours tieing, knotting and putting in seizings, helping to make the rig very polished in finish. A sail of this size made up of individual panels is a great deal of work to assemble.

    Also to my sister Monica who helped with the assembling and painting of the masts.

    Lastly but not least, to my good friend Marcus Raimon with whom I have had many fruitful exchanges of ideas and who made time in his life to join me for the sea trails.

    Have not managed to get photo's of her under sail but they will come.

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  • 02 Oct 2020 07:18
    Reply # 9278297 on 9268694

    Now, what colour for my next sail.

    Blue with white would look kinda cool..


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    Last modified: 02 Oct 2020 07:21 | Anonymous member
  • 01 Oct 2020 06:06
    Reply # 9276041 on 9268694

    Ok, so I googled images for 'Top Gun 9', and this guys pops up...


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  • 01 Oct 2020 02:10
    Reply # 9275696 on 9273668
    Anonymous wrote:Paul uses Weathermax, for which you have to pay top dollar, though it's very good cloth for the money.

    Actually David, I used Top Gun 9 for these sails, which I much prefer to Weathermax. It's a bout a third more expensive than Weathermax but a pleasure to sew.

    Weathermax while making sails that are lovely to handle, is a right royal pain in the butt to cut and sew, so while I have used it, I only use it if requested.

    Top Gun 9 is also available in a much greater range of colours.

    Last modified: 01 Oct 2020 02:12 | Anonymous member
  • 01 Oct 2020 02:03
    Reply # 9275692 on 9273646
    Anonymous wrote:

    Have a question to You: As my boat is more the size of your dinghy it would interest me what dimension of aluminium battens You used on it length diameter and wall thickness ? I have self made wooden battens which tend to break at least one broke because of shoddy construction on my behalf and I want to replace them with similar battens used on your dinghy.


    Karl, your boat is probably quite stiff and at 11M.Sq has a bigger sail than that dinghy. I think I'd use 32mm and a 1.2 or 1.6 mm wall. What is very important, is that it should be grade T6 temper.

    Email me when you are ready if you should need a hand to work things out.

  • 30 Sep 2020 08:38
    Reply # 9273668 on 9273096
    Graham wrote:
    Asmat wrote:

    We've come a long way since Donald Ridler sailed Erik the Red across the Atlantic using sails made of cotton bedsheets and bamboo battens.

    Yes, but you still could, if you were impecunious, or needed to jury rig in some remote place.  That is an essential attraction of junk rig, its potential for low tech, low cost, low stress solutions.  

    Well, I agree about the low tech, low cost, low stress aspect. We don't actually need the high tech cloths that the pointies do, we can get away with lower tech, or we can choose cloths for other attributes, such as UV resistance. Paul uses Weathermax, for which you have to pay top dollar, though it's very good cloth for the money.

    I have always tried to seek out good cloth at the lowest price I can find. Cloth with the occasional flaws, and ends of rolls, redundant stock, etc, comes cheaper than a full roll of 100% perfect cloth from the regular suppliers. That's why my last few sails have been made from cloth supplied by "englishseadog" on eBay. Then I've use the best sailmaking techniques that I can manage, to make the most of those materials.

  • 30 Sep 2020 08:11
    Reply # 9273646 on 9268694

    Have a question to You: As my boat is more the size of your dinghy it would interest me what dimension of aluminium battens You used on it length diameter and wall thickness ? I have self made wooden battens which tend to break at least one broke because of shoddy construction on my behalf and I want to replace them with similar battens used on your dinghy.

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