Boat re-design

<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
  • 03 Nov 2019 22:20
    Reply # 8089706 on 8085015
    Anonymous wrote:

    On headroom:

    Climbers traditionally rely on having "three points in contact". Sailors do, too, in rough weather. Pick any three from feet, buttocks, hips, shoulders, hands - and head. I find myself frequently jamming my head against the headlining when I'm changing clothes.

    Working at the galley or chart table, one's head is bowed down, looking at the work in hand, so one's height is less than when standing at attention. Here, again, it helps to press one's forehead against something to keep both hands free. So headroom here should be less than one might think.

    Even on the centreline of the boat, one moves fore and aft not completely upright but with head bowed a little. Here, there's no need for headroom any greater than one's height when standing at attention, which gives a few inches of clearance in practice.

    Most stock designs for 32ft boats would give this amount of headroom, unless one is much taller than average. And a 32ft boat is as large as a single person needs (speaking as one who has owned a 34.5ft boat that was large enough for two people and rather generously sized for one).

    All true for a weekender but IMO not for a liveaboard boat. At the very least I will want standing headroom through the centerline of the boat. Many moons ago when I was on the large gray "cruise" boats I was always hitting my head on various pipes, fittings, and whatever else, and have the scars to prove it. I have zero desire to go through that again on my boat. Barefoot I am just over 6'2" so it won't take a lot to modify most designs for me, but from what I have seen in my searching I am seriously limited to choices within about 400 miles of my location. I have found boats that would work well as offshore cruising boats but they are primarily set up for freshwater festivities with all of the comforts of home. I do not want to pay a great deal of money for things that I will have to strip out, not to mention that these boats, having been only in freshwater, generally cost a premium over and above what you would likely find on a coast. 
  • 03 Nov 2019 22:12
    Reply # 8089703 on 8084272
    Anonymous wrote:

    Seems as if you have time, finance and available workspace, but need to work out space parameters governing design.Now whilst busy practicing tool handling skills in the way of a dinghy build, it might be a good idea to knock together  a habitation module mock-up, to see how much space, or precisely how little habitation space you can get away with.Standing headroom is only essential in one area, preferably with the galley to hand and from  where a lookout can be kept. At the same time, it is most practical to have this spot below the companionway. Moving aft of this will be into the cockpit, with no limits on headroom. Then moving forward can be directly to a seating or a sleeping space. Provided a party boat is not required, as already explained earlier in the this thread, it might surprise you how small of a boat is really needed.



    The space requirement if it were just me could be quite small, but it won't just be me. I have two rescue pups, aka my "private security contractors", whom I am very attached to going with me. I am very aware of the drawbacks to having dogs on board and have given it a lot of thought, but at the end of the day they will be going where I go. Secondly, I anticipate my nephew, and possibly my nieces, wanting to spend time on the boat as well along with their boyfriends/girlfriend de jour, and will need to alot some private space for visitors from time to time. Besides, the extra storage space will come in very handy for my tools and such.

    Thinking about it a little more I imagine I will have trouble getting my nephew off the boat, in fact I can hear him now, "Here, have some more bacon. Want some donuts, too? How is that blood pressure these days?" ;-)

    Last modified: 04 Nov 2019 01:40 | Anonymous member
  • 31 Oct 2019 12:01
    Reply # 8085015 on 8079438

    On headroom:

    Climbers traditionally rely on having "three points in contact". Sailors do, too, in rough weather. Pick any three from feet, buttocks, hips, shoulders, hands - and head. I find myself frequently jamming my head against the headlining when I'm changing clothes.

    Working at the galley or chart table, one's head is bowed down, looking at the work in hand, so one's height is less than when standing at attention. Here, again, it helps to press one's forehead against something to keep both hands free. So headroom here should be less than one might think.

    Even on the centreline of the boat, one moves fore and aft not completely upright but with head bowed a little. Here, there's no need for headroom any greater than one's height when standing at attention, which gives a few inches of clearance in practice.

    Most stock designs for 32ft boats would give this amount of headroom, unless one is much taller than average. And a 32ft boat is as large as a single person needs (speaking as one who has owned a 34.5ft boat that was large enough for two people and rather generously sized for one).

  • 30 Oct 2019 19:55
    Reply # 8084272 on 8079438

    Seems as if you have time, finance and available workspace, but need to work out space parameters governing design.Now whilst busy practicing tool handling skills in the way of a dinghy build, it might be a good idea to knock together  a habitation module mock-up, to see how much space, or precisely how little habitation space you can get away with.Standing headroom is only essential in one area, preferably with the galley to hand and from  where a lookout can be kept. At the same time, it is most practical to have this spot below the companionway. Moving aft of this will be into the cockpit, with no limits on headroom. Then moving forward can be directly to a seating or a sleeping space. Provided a party boat is not required, as already explained earlier in the this thread, it might surprise you how small of a boat is really needed.

    Last modified: 30 Oct 2019 19:58 | Anonymous member
  • 29 Oct 2019 19:49
    Reply # 8082749 on 8082711
    Anonymous wrote:

    I now confidently predict a deluge of dinghy designs.



    All submitted dinghy designs must include: glass bottoms, planing foils, bow thrusters, be jet propulsion compatible, minimum 9' LOA, and weigh less than 25 lbs. 


    Seriously though, thanks.

  • 29 Oct 2019 19:25
    Reply # 8082711 on 8079438

    I now confidently predict a deluge of dinghy designs.

    I'll get in first with the 7' 7" Nutshell pram (the 9' 6" Nutshell is also excellent, but a bit large for a tender). There's plenty of "how to" info available on these.


  • 29 Oct 2019 17:43
    Reply # 8082540 on 8079438

    Originally I believed I would simply buy an older long term cruising capable boat that fit at least my minimum criteria and give it a good refit, but discovered that there are few designs out there in the 35+/- foot range that suit enough of my criteria for me to be happy with, number one being headroom. I start seeing more suitable boats in the 40+ foot range but that is more boat than I need or want.

    Due to my professional background I have a better idea of the scale and scope of this kind of project than the average neophyte so I know better what I am getting into. My free time is my own, as is my disposable income, so personal life conflicts will be negligible. Additionally, for the next 3-4 years I will be stuck here about 400 miles from the nearest saltwater with few sailing opportunities that don't involve sharing water with multiple power cruisers so I have very little interest in building a weekender that I will not have much use for. And I don't golf.

    While it is true that I have zero boat building experience and definitely insufficient woodworking experience, I am mechanically inclined and good at spatial concepts as well as thinking several moves ahead in a project. Because of my lack of woodworking experience my plan is to practice new techniques with cheap lumber before applying them to boat appropriate materials. Also, I do have access to people with considerable experience for help and advice as needed. 

    While I have never worked with any kind of boat design before, I do have experience in designing stowage/securement plans for bluewater barge work as well as design experience with heavily loaded temporary structures under seismic loadings whose accelerations are not at all dissimilar to those found at sea. Obviously I have zero experience with center of effort or buoyancy calculations but I do know enough to recognize boat design intent in various structural members and connections.

    To summarize, while this may be a new type of endeavor for me, my eyes are wide open - I am not some accountant who cannot tell the difference between a jigsaw and a miter saw, or uses his brother-in-law's borrowed wrench (spanner) to stir paint with. Yes Mike, I am talking about you! ;-)

    That all said, I most definitely appreciate advice and tips from those with actual experience, and am now looking at dinghy designs. 

  • 29 Oct 2019 09:43
    Reply # 8081792 on 8079438
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    To build or not to build

    In the end, I think that the most important question is if one likes to build or not. If the boat-building process itself is rewarding, then it is no big deal if one is left high and dry for a few years  -  because that is what it takes. Building a 32-footer, not to mention one at 37, will most probably take at least five years. Five years with either no boat to sail in, or five years without time to sail, because one is busy with building a boat.

    Five years, at least  -  not my cup of tea, for sure...

    Therefore, it is good that you, William have decided to warm up by building a dinghy first. That will soon tell you if you like it or not.

    Good luck!

    Arne


    Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 15:18 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 29 Oct 2019 08:32
    Reply # 8081759 on 8080490
    Anonymous wrote:


     I have felt obliged to quote the old saying: "build the first boat for your enemy, the second boat for your friend - and the third boat for yourself". Or "build a dinghy, to get some notion of the use of the materials and methods - it could act as the tender to the eventual big boat; then build a 20 - 25ft weekender, to learn more about handling a boat under sail, and what you really want from your dream boat; then you'll know enough to embark on the major boatbuilding project that a 30+ft boat is bound to be".

    That remains as true as ever it was.

    Yes, I'd second (or third) that. Sound advice methinks!
  • 28 Oct 2019 22:32
    Reply # 8081240 on 8079438

    William,

    also remember that the cost and the amount of work are proportional to the cube of the length. This means that a thirty foot boat entails more than three times the amount of work and cost that a twenty foot boat does. Having built boats for most of my life, including a 41 foot from scratch and major remodels etc of up to 50 foot boats I know how much work is involved.

    The statistics also show that little more than 10% of first time boat builds of this size actually reach completion in the same ownership.

    David Tylers advice is very good.

    All the best with the project. The more real knowledge you have before you start the better, and the more likely you are to be able to complete the project.


<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software