CARAVELINA - New JR scow minicruiser

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   Next >  Last >> 
  • 17 May 2020 02:08
    Reply # 8974018 on 7917477

    That's not a tank.

    THIS is a tank!

    Seriously though - your planking looks lovely, both inside and out.

    You are on the way to a unique and interesting boat. Good luck and keep up the progress reports.


    Last modified: 17 May 2020 02:09 | Anonymous member
  • 16 May 2020 16:34
    Reply # 8973048 on 7917477

    Update on the hull building, specifically the bow part. The sides / boards of the bow made of 10mm plywood are bent at a radius of 63 cm! After many tests, I ended up with 5mm deep incisions every 3 cm to allow bending.  After priming with Epidian 601 resin I filled the cuts with thickened resin (with quartz flour)  and attached the still sticky panels on the frame, clamped and stitched. Then came fillets, glass fabric stripes and finally a piece of glass cloths on the entire inside surface. Now my beautiful SCOW-BOW is as strong as a tank! 

    4 files
    Last modified: 16 May 2020 16:38 | Anonymous member
  • 16 May 2020 01:33
    Reply # 8971974 on 7917477

    Thanks David and Graeme for your detailed comments and advice. Since I need my masts to be easily fold down, I plan to make tabernacles. The idea is shown in the sketch attached. As you can see, the  bury is sufficient - over 10%, as minimum required. 

    Lower part of the mast will be made of wood, with square section in the tabernacle, blended right above the hinge to the round that will go into the aluminum mast. It seems to be logical just extend this plug above the gate cutout, however it is not that simple as there are some parts welded inside the mast - as shown in the picture.

    Now I think I could chisel out a groove in the plug extension, and when inside fill it with thickened  epoxy, then put the door back.

    The other solution is an aluminum pipe sleeve or glass-epoxy belt over it. The first one is elegant but heavier.



    3 files
  • 14 May 2020 07:52
    Reply # 8967768 on 7917477

    Kris, the access door is flush with the surface, so is there already a doubler on the inside to support it over the whole area of the cutout? Where does the upper end of the cutout fall, in relation to the mast partners? It looks from the plans as though there is only the minimum bury, especially on the after mast in the middle of the cockpit, but if you could build higher square boxes to drop the masts into, I wonder whether any extra reinforcement would be needed. Alternatively, a 6 inch tube with 0.125in wall is either absolutely perfect as a sleeve to fit over 146mm, or too tight. I think I'd try to get a short offcut on loan to see whether it fits.

  • 14 May 2020 02:48
    Reply # 8967465 on 7917477

    Nice progress and I look forward to some good photographs when it is out of the shed. 

    I really envy you being able to get these aluminium lamp posts.

    Being close to one end, would it not be possible to insert and glue in, a light timber plug or maybe an aluminium sleeve (with plenty of length extending  past each end of the weak area)?

    I'm bumped this back up because I too am interested in the answers to your question.


    Last modified: 14 May 2020 08:09 | Anonymous member
  • 12 May 2020 14:01
    Reply # 8963220 on 7917477

    The hull of Carabela 650 is pretty advanced, built from inside - out.   


    The aluminum lamp posts are popular and recommended in the JR society. I bought two masts - aluminum lamp post. They are 600 cm tall with 14,6 cm diameter at base. The wall is 4,2mm thick.  Some 60 cm above the base there lower edge of the cutout - gate to make electrical connections, which is a week point.

    I think there are at least three ways to make it stronger: weld, put something insite, or glue the edge and wrap few times with glass cloth and soak with epoxy resin. I tend to the last one. 

    I think several JRA members already met this issue and the way to cope with is already  practiced. Please advise how to solve this issue.

    2 files
  • 21 Jan 2020 08:31
    Reply # 8638415 on 8627137
    Anonymous wrote:

    Great news, Kris! It will be interesting to see how long it takes you to build by this "slot together" method. It's interesting to see that the strongback you're using is made from steel and mounted on castors, as that may be the way that my SibLim 7m design will be set up. The video is labelled 'part 3', but I was unable to track down parts 1 and 2 - do they exist on youtube?

     Unfortunately, the previous two parts are not in the state allowing on publication yet. Setting the mounting frame on castors was good shot, especially with the limited space. However, this requires a solid and flat floor.


  • 20 Jan 2020 08:30
    Reply # 8627137 on 7917477

    Great news, Kris! It will be interesting to see how long it takes you to build by this "slot together" method. It's interesting to see that the strongback you're using is made from steel and mounted on castors, as that may be the way that my SibLim 7m design will be set up. The video is labelled 'part 3', but I was unable to track down parts 1 and 2 - do they exist on youtube?

  • 20 Jan 2020 06:09
    Reply # 8626607 on 7917477

    It is good to see that there is another amateur boat builder out there, and especially building a boat designed for the junk rig. I will follow your progress with a lot of interest, both the building and the the sailing performance when completed. This is an interesting boat design and for a monohull packs a lot of space for the length, in fact probably not much less than the 6 meter catamaran I am building. I am always looking out for the next boat to build as I actually greatly enjoy the building process. Trying towork out the answers to questions along the way adds a bit of challenge to life, and I enjoy using all the boat-building skills I have learned over the years. 

    You are struggling with cold temperatures and I am struggling with hot temperatures. Today it was 34 degrees Celsius in the area I was working so I held a stop work meeting with myself and we decided we could not continue until the temperatures become cooler. 

    1 file
  • 19 Jan 2020 18:08
    Reply # 8621488 on 7917477

    Hi, I'm back to post after some months. The technical documentation of my "JR dream boat" has been completed by the French Naval Architect Jerome Delaunay and is available here  CARABELA650 Plans . Despite cold winter time, that is not favorable to work in a unheated shed, there is noticeable progress in actual boat construction.  Today I put together a movie on present state and uploaded it to YT. My comments are in Polish, but not the video ;) . There are tens or hundreds issues to be solved in front of me, but even more fun. I am permanently digging in the all technical forum posts and JRA Magazines, but will  be discussing also here, asking for an advice.

    I've been told, there is in the USA another JR enthusiast who obtained the CARABELA plans and will start the construction.

    12 files
<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   Next >  Last >> 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software