Seeding a Junk rig revival in Hong Kong

  • 19 Dec 2011 04:41
    Reply # 776906 on 776013
    Deleted user
    Hi Guys,

    This is superb, thank you. I have forwarded the information to Rob and request for measurements. 

    Have also suggested he joins the JRA!

    Thanks for the continuing support
    Lesley
  • 17 Dec 2011 19:14
    Reply # 776151 on 776013
    It would be so good to get a junk rigged Pico sailing alongside some Picos with standard rigs, both "beginners" and "racing" rigs.I think the right area to settle on is 6.33 sq m, the same as the "racing" Pico. Then they can get a direct comparison.
    I've scaled down Fantail's sail to 6.33 sq m, added the basic dimensions, and put it into "David's Doodles". I suggest putting the yard and boom in sleeves, to decrease the sailmaking and sparmaking work, and using Arne's method for batten pockets. I would think that heavy spinnaker nylon, 2oz/sq yd, would be suitable cloth.
    Lesley, can you ask the mast height and diameter, and boom length and diameter. Maybe they can both be used.

    Last modified: 17 Dec 2011 23:36 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 17 Dec 2011 19:00
    Reply # 776147 on 776013
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

                                                                                Stavanger, Sat

    Lesly, just a quick answer. You wrote:

    "I would hate this to be a waste of time, or a disappointment, so comments from those of you who are tech experts would be very welcome. Am I right in thinking they'd need cambered sails."

    I have had a look at that Pico. With its big main and tiny jib, I guess a JR  mast could be erected in the same position as the BM mast. I could have liked to crimp "Broremann"s sail to fit that boat. Broremann's sail has proven to be efficient and super-easy to handle. All I would need to do is to produce the drawing with new numbers on. With the "Chapter 5"  and the story of the making of Broremann's sail in hand ("Small is beatutiful"), anyone could make the sail. It would be a great club workshop project. The paper templates could be stored to speed up production of more sails later.

    The question is: What sail area should I settle on, 7sqm? Remember, the sail is easy to reef so it is no problem if one has to sail half of the time with a panel or two dropped.

    Arne

    PS, Sun, 18th Dec: I guess I will be busy for the next week, so drawing up a a new rig with details and instructions will have to wait a bit.

    Last modified: 18 Dec 2011 08:33 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 17 Dec 2011 17:54
    Reply # 776129 on 776013

    Despite the talk of putting a JR on a Laser and nothing ever happening, well I'm afraid it has happened.  This was a follow up to the talk I gave at the Yately Club in the spring, and one of the members decided to experiment for himself. He didn't get too far before the winter weather closed in, but it seems to work.

    I'm not suggesting that you try to sell the Split Rig to the locals in HK, but the photos might encourage someone to rig a dinghy (with cambered sails).

    Cheers,  Slieve.

    PS. My 'View Profile' seems to be working now, so I'll update it when I get a few minutes.

    Last modified: 17 Dec 2011 18:14 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Dec 2011 17:32
    Reply # 776117 on 776013
    Deleted user
    Aww shucks guys, you're too kind!

    It's just too cool an opportunity to miss - two 'gweilos' (foreign devils) showing the chinese what they're missing!! You would not believe the interest that Crib has sparked here. "Please could I come out on your boat?"  every one of them a bermudan rig owner and many of them chinese. Plus one who's a motor junk dive boat guy who appears to be besotted with our red sails!

    Two of the chinese sailing instructors came out with us and had a great time - couldn't get over how easy she is to sail. Eileen was interesting to watch as she experimented with the sheeting angles. Her husband has a friend of a friend with a sailing junk.... we're angling for a visit! It's Eileen who's struggling with the translation of Eat plankton pointy people!

    What worries me more than it appears to worry the people who live here, is that it won't be long before the knowledge is gone, for good (or rather, bad.)  I just hope we can keep the interest going and translated into something tangible, before we leave.

    Lesley
  • 17 Dec 2011 15:30
    Reply # 776073 on 776013

    "Coals to Newcastle" and "Ice to Eskimos".  Well done.  jds

  • 17 Dec 2011 15:11
    Reply # 776060 on 776013

    Wow,

    This is the most inspiring read I have had in a long time. Congratulation! I would guess that the most tried designs would be best suited. Arne, Viktor and David, please get to the drawing board, but remember: even the Chineese have forgotten how to, and they have never tried modern materials.

  • 17 Dec 2011 12:03
    Message # 776013
    Deleted user
    In the spirit of the above, I've had a positive reaction from Rob who runs our Yacht club sailing school, who thinks it would be a great winter project to re rig a Pico, so the local youngsters could get some experience with junk rig.

    I would hate this to be a waste of time, or a disappointment, so comments from those of you who are tech experts would be very welcome. Am I right in thinking they'd need cambered sails.

    The specs for the laser pico are here:
    http://www.laserperformance.com/pico/specs

    the other alternative would be an optimist dinghy.

    Personally, I think they would benefit from drawing up plans etc, themselves, but if there are sailplans or previous experience out there already, it can only help. We're hoping to leave march and will be out cruising January, so the time I myself can put into this is limited and any help would be appreciated.

    Any thoughts?

    Lesley
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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