FanShi's vane gear

  • 03 Mar 2021 12:58
    Reply # 10158976 on 10141244
    Anonymous wrote:And the seat across the lute is a perfect place for a sundowner on a calm evening!

     That vane gear, so tidy, so neat and so SIMPLE. Compare with an exploded drawing of a Monitor self-steering gear. I know, it's not the same, but still .......

    A lute stern. It has possibilities, doesn't it? 

  • 26 Feb 2021 08:27
    Reply # 10141244 on 10063748
    And the seat across the lute is a perfect place for a sundowner on a calm evening!
  • 26 Feb 2021 08:23
    Reply # 10141241 on 10063748

    Thanks, Annie, that's what I wanted to see.

    Yes, it does look neat, doesn't it, Len? It's on account of the lute stern we added to the design. Without it, the vane gear would appear as it normally does, aft of the transom on which the rudders are hung. I saw an authentic sampan with a stern like this, a long time ago, so I thought we were on safe ground incorporating it, and it does a good job of enclosing and protecting all of the steering gear. 

  • 25 Feb 2021 16:38
    Reply # 10138323 on 10127400
    Anonymous wrote:

    Will do.  I'll see if I can take reasonable photos on this tablet and then post them.

    ...

    Edit:  Two files attached.  I hope they give enough information.  I allowed for the connection to be moved around if necessary.  It hasn't been necessary.
    Wow, totally inside the cockpit, I am used to seeing systems that hang way off the back and require hanging off the back to maintain and sometimes even to set. Very nice.
  • 23 Feb 2021 04:02
    Reply # 10127400 on 10065223
    David wrote:Annie, when you can, please could you post photos of exactly how you made the crosslink between the two tab tillers and the latch gear? That's something that I've not seen in detail.

    Trim tabs work best on boats with a lot of directional stability, so I think that the two large skegs have a lot to do with how well this vane gear seems to be coping at the moment (and that's a good reason not to make the skegs smaller on any SibLings). The acid test will be when you get to do a scarey full speed run in a seaway.


    Will do.  I'll see if I can take reasonable photos on this tablet and then post them.

    I can't imagine why anyone would want to make the skegs smaller.  I have already tried the gear in a very nasty beam sea, running at about 5 knots of so.  It worked very well.   

    Edit:  Two files attached.  I hope they give enough information.  I allowed for the connection to be moved around if necessary.  It hasn't been necessary.
    2 files
    Last modified: 25 Feb 2021 01:51 | Anonymous member
  • 06 Feb 2021 08:28
    Reply # 10065223 on 10063748

    Annie wrote:

    David has drawings of the self-steering gear, on the website.  At this stage, I cannot praise it too highly.  It is far better than any servo gear I have lived with.  I wonder if 2 rudders and 2 trimtabs help with this.  There is a lot of power from those big trimtabs and they are always fully immersed.   However, I haven't used it in heavy conditions, so cannot say that I have thoroughly tested it.

    Annie, when you can, please could you post photos of exactly how you made the crosslink between the two tab tillers and the latch gear? That's something that I've not seen in detail.

    Trim tabs work best on boats with a lot of directional stability, so I think that the two large skegs have a lot to do with how well this vane gear seems to be coping at the moment (and that's a good reason not to make the skegs smaller on any SibLings). The acid test will be when you get to do a scarey full speed run in a seaway.

    Last modified: 06 Feb 2021 08:31 | Anonymous member
  • 05 Feb 2021 16:51
    Message # 10063748
    Last modified: 05 Feb 2021 16:52 | Anonymous member
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software