best hull–shape for junk rigged boats

  • 17 Jan 2019 04:57
    Reply # 7005913 on 7005040
    Len Ovens wrote:
    Looks really enjoyable... and warmer than here (frozen windshield this morning). I have to ask though, I notice you have more of a poop deck than a cockpit. How do you like that? It would seem nicer at anchor, how is it under way? (it looks pretty too BTW)
    The cockpit is really an aft deck with a small footwell. It is a great feature of the yacht, both at anchor and underway. Conventional cockpits seem rather crowded in comparison. And there is space for a full double berth cabin under the aft deck. Not bad for a 10 metre yacht!

    The photo below illustrates the cockpit, (aft deck?) in use mid ocean.

    Last modified: 17 Jan 2019 04:59 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Jan 2019 04:51
    Reply # 7005910 on 7005216
    David Tyler wrote:
    I enjoyed it too, in the cold depths of the British winter. It looked as though you were doing better than 6 knots, Alison and Catherine were holding on tight, and Catherine's enjoyment was easy to see. The sail still looked to be in good shape.





    We averaged over 7 knots for the 20 mile passage, and that included a couple of miles at less than 6 knots while in the lee of Whangaparaoa Peninsula. The sail is working out well. Apart from my minor yard problems I have not done a single bit of rig or sail maintenance since before our New Caledonia cruise.
    Last modified: 17 Jan 2019 04:52 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Jan 2019 20:52
    Reply # 7005216 on 7005040
    Len wrote:
    David Thatcher wrote:

    Even a more cruising orientated junk rig yacht can scoot along. Here is the URL to a video of some enjoyable sailing we had recently on our old pile of 'Junk'

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRBUh6mjxpA

    Looks really enjoyable... and warmer than here (frozen windshield this morning). I have to ask though, I notice you have more of a poop deck than a cockpit. How do you like that? It would seem nicer at anchor, how is it under way? (it looks pretty too BTW)
    I enjoyed it too, in the cold depths of the British winter. It looked as though you were doing better than 6 knots, Alison and Catherine were holding on tight, and Catherine's enjoyment was easy to see. The sail still looked to be in good shape.

    What kinds of racing are there? These are some:

    • One design, in which the main variables are the preparation of the boat and the skill of the sailor.  In which case, the hull shape has already been decided upon. It doesn't matter what it is, as everyone is on a level playing field.
    • Restricted class racing, in which only some major parameters (eg LOA, sail area) are set by those who are going to participate (the International Moth and the America's Cup boats, at opposite ends of the scale). In which case hull shape is one of the factors that will determine success, as well as skill in sailing the boat. The race is won at the design and construction phase, as much as on the course.
    • Handicap racing, the type of racing that takes place at local level everywhere, as it's often difficult to get one design fleets together. In which case, you are competing against the handicappers as well as the other sailors, trying to persuade them that your boat is slow, when in fact it is fast. Here, the shape of the hull scarcely matters. A slow boat can win races if it has a good handicap.
    • Short-handed ocean racing. Here, it's "man against the ocean", with seamanship, and physical and mental stamina, having major roles to play, and it's more important that the boat will go the distance and treat the sailor well; its hull shape recedes into the background.
    • And there will be other forms of racing which don't come readily to mind.
    Of these, then, restricted class racing is the only one where you get to choose the hull shape as an important part of the total package.
    In handicap racing at club level, you simply choose a good boat of a class that is well represented locally, so that you have someone to race against directly, not on handicap. On any given race day, you will be beaten by someone whose boat suited those conditions better; and on another race day, you will do well because your boat suited those conditions better than the others. It's a game of chance, as much as of skill. If I were the racing kind (which thank the lord I'm not, sir), I wouldn't waste time and money on handicap racing.



  • 16 Jan 2019 19:36
    Reply # 7005040 on 7003915
    David Thatcher wrote:

    Even a more cruising orientated junk rig yacht can scoot along. Here is the URL to a video of some enjoyable sailing we had recently on our old pile of 'Junk'

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRBUh6mjxpA

    Looks really enjoyable... and warmer than here (frozen windshield this morning). I have to ask though, I notice you have more of a poop deck than a cockpit. How do you like that? It would seem nicer at anchor, how is it under way? (it looks pretty too BTW)
  • 16 Jan 2019 16:02
    Reply # 7004560 on 7003361

    Having raced a junkrigged X-99 four Seasons, I can say:

    1 You can win a race round islans, seamarks and other imobile rounding Points.

    2 If you race around a set race track, you will be a very good sailor to be in the upper Third of finishers.

    3 If you convert a CE marked boat, you will have to get it resertificated.

    4 I have had a good time racing, and I have learned a lot about sailing, but I dont think I would rigged another boat for racing only.

  • 16 Jan 2019 05:42
    Reply # 7003915 on 7003361

    Gotta put my bit in here. That is a bit like asking what is the best hull shape for a yacht. The best hull shape for racing probably depends what kind of yachts you are racing against. A lot of junk rigs seem to get fitted to cruising yachts with very definite cruising yacht hull shapes. As such they perform very similarly to their bermudan rigged cousins. Sometimes not as good to windward, but often a lot better downwind. There have been junk rigs fitted to more performance orientated hulls I think some of them have performed very well in racing type situations. 

    So to me the answer to this question is probably 'what type of sailing/racing do you want to do and who might you be competing with? It would be good to see a real performance hull fitted with a junk rig which reflects the latest developments in the rig, such as the new wing sail that David Tyler is working on, and then see how the junk rig yacht performs against it's bermudan rigged siblings.

    Even a more cruising orientated junk rig yacht can scoot along. Here is the URL to a video of some enjoyable sailing we had recently on our old pile of 'Junk'

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRBUh6mjxpA

    Last modified: 16 Jan 2019 05:46 | Anonymous member
  • 15 Jan 2019 23:22
    Reply # 7003453 on 7003361

    It's too vague a question, Georg. What kind of racing? The spectrum goes from round-the-buoys dayboats and dinghies to round-the-world GGR cruisers, with a lot of different kinds of racing in between.

  • 15 Jan 2019 23:01
    Reply # 7003414 on 7003361
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Do you mean racing against other boats or do you just mean sailing faster than them?

    Arne


  • 15 Jan 2019 22:18
    Message # 7003361

    after having two junk–rigged boats i wonder which hull–shape might be best for racing…  


       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software