EEEEK! Lazy jack line snapped!

  • 24 Jan 2020 00:34
    Reply # 8664186 on 8646304

    As others say here, Nic, the good thing about junk rig is that it is a low-stress, low-tech rig and easy to sort out.  You have good masts, and the Topgun sails should still be in good condition, though I do not remember them having sail covers.  The material should be ok but the stitching may have deteriorated after four years in the sun.  You will need to take a close look at the bamboo yards and battens, which may not have weathered well, and inspect the rest of the running rigging.  Replacing them with aluminium tubes if necessary would be pretty straightforward.  Or at least carry some spare bamboo!  But it is all easier and less critical than a towering bermudian rig with tonnes of compression loads.  Good advice in Arne's writings, though, and in Practical Junk Rig, and from other members of the Junk Rig Association.  I am more than happy to have a look at the rig if you ask.  Once you get Mango Moon sorted, you'll have a great cruising boat.

  • 23 Jan 2020 18:14
    Reply # 8661489 on 8646304
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:

    EEEEK! Lazy jack line snapped!

    Hello all, I’m brand new to sailing and to junk rigs, I’ve been quietly learning all I can for the past year or so and Managed to acquire a boat up on the Sunshine Coast, unfortunately I arrived at the boat yesterday after a few big storms in QLD to find one of my lazy jack lines had frayed off and snapped. 

    Would anyone be able to recommend Someone on or near the Sunshine Coast who can come to the boat and Re-rig them for me?

    any and all advice is very much welcomed!

    Cheers for your time.

    Nic V


    Nic,

    The junk rig is not a typical turn-key ready rig, but a rig for the handyman. Luckily, you will not depend on spareparts with 9-digit part-numbers on them, so maintenance is definitely doable.

    In addition to Practical Junk Rig, which David Thatcher suggests, I suggest you reed this very compressed write-up of mine, Junk Rig for Beginners...

    Hopefully, this will get you started.

    Good luck!
    Arne

    PS: There are several ways of making lazyjacks. For my own part, I have gone from the 'original' bridle type LJ (shown in JR for Beginners) to something that basically consists of two stout topping lifts with sail catcher added , like here.

    Last modified: 24 Jan 2020 08:52 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 22 Jan 2020 10:46
    Reply # 8649385 on 8647077
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Nic,

    try contacting Gary Pick, he lives in Uki and keeps his boat at Tweed Heads. He may know of someone who can help you. Otherwise Graham Cox may be able to suggest someone.

    Which boat did you buy, was it the Badger Dory??

    All the best, David.


    Nic bought Mango Moon, a steel boat that was advertised for some time on this website.  I have offered to look at the rig and discuss options.  The culprit may be chafe, though it is possible the running rigging is not in perfect condition, or as well set up as it could be, since the boat was converted from a Freedom rig, using existing halyards, etc.  It was converted in 2014 but has only been for two short sails of a few hours each since that time.  From what I saw of it during the conversion, I suspect the rig needs a lot of sorting out.
  • 22 Jan 2020 05:19
    Reply # 8647344 on 8646304

    One of the great things about the junk rig is that the simplicity of the rig means that any owner should be able to carry out all maintenance associated with rig. So I would see this as a good opportunity for you to become familiar with various aspects of your rig and learn how to carry out repairs and improvements yourself. You should arm your self with a copy of Practical Junk Rig for technical guidance, a good Bosuns Chair for going up the mast, and get 'stuck in', as we say in New Zealand. Because one of your lazy jack lines has failed just be sure though to carry out a check on other aspects of the rig before going aloft, and also to identify other potential failures. Modern synthetic line is generally very durable so you should be asking why this line has failed. Are the lines near the end of their working life, was the failure caused by chafe, or are the lines of insufficient strength? Be careful about getting a non junk rig sailor to help with your repairs because they probably will not have an understanding of how the junk rig works and how it should be set up.

    Good luck with the repairs.

    Last modified: 22 Jan 2020 05:37 | Anonymous member
  • 22 Jan 2020 04:32
    Reply # 8647077 on 8646304

    Hi Nic,

    try contacting Gary Pick, he lives in Uki and keeps his boat at Tweed Heads. He may know of someone who can help you. Otherwise Graham Cox may be able to suggest someone.

    Which boat did you buy, was it the Badger Dory??

    All the best, David.

  • 22 Jan 2020 02:20
    Message # 8646304

    EEEEK! Lazy jack line snapped!

    Hello all, I’m brand new to sailing and to junk rigs, I’ve been quietly learning all I can for the past year or so and Managed to acquire a boat up on the Sunshine Coast, unfortunately I arrived at the boat yesterday after a few big storms in QLD to find one of my lazy jack lines had frayed off and snapped. 

    Would anyone be able to recommend Someone on or near the Sunshine Coast who can come to the boat and Re-rig them for me?

    any and all advice is very much welcomed!

    Cheers for your time.

    Nic V

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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