my TWO new junk rigged sailboats!!!

  • 03 Jun 2019 15:59
    Reply # 7553125 on 7551572
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hey Jonny, well done you.  I'm so pleased you've had success in your quest.  I also think Walrus looks very interesting.  I'm sure you will have a lot of interest in her.  This style of boat seems to convert very successfully to junk rig - just think of Speedwell - except that people tend to be a bit mean with the sail area.  But then, they are often less than sprightly with bermudan rig, in anything under F3, unless you invest in acres of light weather canvas!  If you do decide to find a new home for her, I suspect there will be a lot of interest.

    Nice to hear that Sabra is going to be off cruising again, too.

    Ahhh. Thanks Annie!!!!  I'm looking forward to messing around with Walrus. The previous owner  did a bit of butchery to her ...which I am already "re-butchering" back  to something usable. As soon as I bought her , I removed a very strange, small square sail type mast on the bow platform as well as an equally strange mizzen mast that was set up for some type of loose footed , gaff mizzen, As well as  removing the bronze , worm gear steering ...that DID NOT work.  Motoring the boat home was QUITE an adventure. Why someone would remove a tiller on a beautiful design like this is beyond me..... but .....all of this came into play with my purchase price. I think he knew no one was as crazy as me to take on this boat! hahaha. This said , as of this "re-butchering" should be pretty straight forward. I'll keep you all posted. Right now? I am on tour in lovely Italy!!!! xoxo
    Last modified: 03 Jun 2019 16:02 | Anonymous member
  • 02 Jun 2019 22:15
    Reply # 7551572 on 7493786

    Hey Jonny, well done you.  I'm so pleased you've had success in your quest.  I also think Walrus looks very interesting.  I'm sure you will have a lot of interest in her.  This style of boat seems to convert very successfully to junk rig - just think of Speedwell - except that people tend to be a bit mean with the sail area.  But then, they are often less than sprightly with bermudan rig, in anything under F3, unless you invest in acres of light weather canvas!  If you do decide to find a new home for her, I suspect there will be a lot of interest.

    Nice to hear that Sabra is going to be off cruising again, too.

  • 31 May 2019 11:30
    Reply # 7523739 on 7512308
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jonny,

    no she was not a fiberglass replica, the Itchen Ferry I had was one of the original ancestors. She was built in 1876 by Summers and Payne of Itchenor near Southampton. She became 100 years old when I owned her and I replaced the stem post, bow knee, both garboard planks, reinforced all of the floors with new galvanized steel fabrications and installed new plywood decks while I owned her. I also purchase a new set of sails for her. She was 19'-3" long, 8'-3" beam, 3'-6" draft and weighed 4 1/2 tons. She was built of pitch pine planking on English oak sawn frames, with an elm keel. She had bronze dump fastenings and was about 85% original. I bought her while I was in College in London and took her to the East Coast at Tollesbury. I raced her in the East Coast Old Gaffers Association Race in 1972 and came 12th, if I remember correctly, out of a fleet of about 80 boats. When I left College in 1972 I towed back to my home in the West Midlands, where I did the work on her in a boatyard at Stourport on Severn, when she was relaunched I motored her down the River Severn to the Bristol Channel and sailed her out of Pill on the Avon  She was built for the professional captain of a racing boat on the Solent and was given the same name, Dilkusha, which means contentment in Hindustani. The owner of the racing boat was a retired army officer who had served in India. She had a traditional gaff cutter rig of 325 sq. ft. and when racing with a third jib, topsail and water sail I could set 475 sq. ft. I lost track of her after I sold her to a priest and she returned to the South coast at Poole Harbor in 1976. I heard rumors that the new owner had her professionally rebuilt and a new keel installed but nothing after that. If anyone in the UK has heard anything about her I would be interested in knowing.

    All the best with the new boats, David.

    Wow. Sounds like she was something very special! Thanks again David!
  • 30 May 2019 22:51
    Reply # 7512308 on 7493786

    Hi Jonny,

    no she was not a fiberglass replica, the Itchen Ferry I had was one of the original ancestors. She was built in 1876 by Summers and Payne of Itchenor near Southampton. She became 100 years old when I owned her and I replaced the stem post, bow knee, both garboard planks, reinforced all of the floors with new galvanized steel fabrications and installed new plywood decks while I owned her. I also purchase a new set of sails for her. She was 19'-3" long, 8'-3" beam, 3'-6" draft and weighed 4 1/2 tons. She was built of pitch pine planking on English oak sawn frames, with an elm keel. She had bronze dump fastenings and was about 85% original. I bought her while I was in College in London and took her to the East Coast at Tollesbury. I raced her in the East Coast Old Gaffers Association Race in 1972 and came 12th, if I remember correctly, out of a fleet of about 80 boats. When I left College in 1972 I towed back to my home in the West Midlands, where I did the work on her in a boatyard at Stourport on Severn, when she was relaunched I motored her down the River Severn to the Bristol Channel and sailed her out of Pill on the Avon  She was built for the professional captain of a racing boat on the Solent and was given the same name, Dilkusha, which means contentment in Hindustani. The owner of the racing boat was a retired army officer who had served in India. She had a traditional gaff cutter rig of 325 sq. ft. and when racing with a third jib, topsail and water sail I could set 475 sq. ft. I lost track of her after I sold her to a priest and she returned to the South coast at Poole Harbor in 1976. I heard rumors that the new owner had her professionally rebuilt and a new keel installed but nothing after that. If anyone in the UK has heard anything about her I would be interested in knowing.

    All the best with the new boats, David.

  • 30 May 2019 12:49
    Reply # 7502416 on 7501270
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jonny,

    congratulations on the boat purchases. 

    Walrus looks interesting! I owned an Itchen Ferry back in the mid 1970's in England. She was a great boat and one I have very fond memories of. The Itchen Ferry was one of the boat types that Lyle Hess used in developing his designs. I met Lyle a couple of times when I lived in California in the 1980's and gave him copies of an Itchen Ferry lines drawing from the copy of Dixon Kemp's Manual of Yacht and Boat Sailing then in my possession. From what I have read Walrus was copied from a lines plan of Serrafin published in a magazine and when contacted Lyle Hess did not want to hear of his design being built in fiberglass, so the builder developed his own plan based on the lines in the magazine article, and this became Walrus and her sisters. Lyle Hess obviously changed his mind later when designing the Bristol Channel Cutter and Falmouth Cutter!

    The sail area does look a little small for the weight of the boat, but it looks (from the height of the mast and the clearance to the coach roof) as if you could quite easily add a couple of panels to the foot of the sail to increase the area. These could be cambered panels as they would perform better in the lighter airs when the lower panels would be set. It looks as if the sail she has is flat cut.

    Anyway I hope that you enjoy your new babies!!

    David.

    Thanks David! 

    Wow! Great story! Those Itchen Ferry sailboats look really nice!!  I'm assuming it was the 25? Apparently the designer of the Aquarius (his name escapes me now) , was a very large man , and designed her for big folks. A very good thing for my 6'3 self.

    Walrus' sail is definitely flat. I was thinking the same thing ... either:

    adding panels on the bottom?

    or possibly 

    adding panels vertically at the leech? 

    The boat has a substantial , Stainless steel frame over the cockpit for Solar panels , canvas etc ...so , I'll have to figure out the best arrangement sail and mainsheet wise.

    Cheers!


    Last modified: 30 May 2019 12:50 | Anonymous member
  • 30 May 2019 11:36
    Reply # 7501270 on 7493786

    Hi Jonny,

    congratulations on the boat purchases. 

    Walrus looks interesting! I owned an Itchen Ferry back in the mid 1970's in England. She was a great boat and one I have very fond memories of. The Itchen Ferry was one of the boat types that Lyle Hess used in developing his designs. I met Lyle a couple of times when I lived in California in the 1980's and gave him copies of an Itchen Ferry lines drawing from the copy of Dixon Kemp's Manual of Yacht and Boat Sailing then in my possession. From what I have read Walrus was copied from a lines plan of Serrafin published in a magazine and when contacted Lyle Hess did not want to hear of his design being built in fiberglass, so the builder developed his own plan based on the lines in the magazine article, and this became Walrus and her sisters. Lyle Hess obviously changed his mind later when designing the Bristol Channel Cutter and Falmouth Cutter!

    The sail area does look a little small for the weight of the boat, but it looks (from the height of the mast and the clearance to the coach roof) as if you could quite easily add a couple of panels to the foot of the sail to increase the area. These could be cambered panels as they would perform better in the lighter airs when the lower panels would be set. It looks as if the sail she has is flat cut.

    Anyway I hope that you enjoy your new babies!!

    David.

    Last modified: 30 May 2019 11:42 | Anonymous member
  • 30 May 2019 10:40
    Reply # 7500433 on 7494167
    Anonymous wrote:

    Congratulations! Why have only one boat when you can have two?! The only problem is that you get torn between the two. 

    It will be interesting to see how the little Lyle Hess design goes with the junk rig. His designs have a reputation of being good sailing and cruising boats with a number of them having found their way to New Zealand. And of course Lynn and Larry Pardey sailed their 24 ft 'Serrafyn' around the world, which is basically a timber version of the same boat.

    Thanks David! Agreed on getting "torn between the two" , but The Sunbird will definitely win! She is a much more comfortable boat for long term.

    The Aquarius wasn't designed by Lyle Hess ...but is more of a very close copy. Her designer was obviously a fan of Lyles. I am looking forward to seeing how she sails as well.  There are a few things that need to be addressed , and then I  can hopefully get her out on the bay soon. 

  • 29 May 2019 22:13
    Reply # 7494167 on 7493786

    Congratulations! Why have only one boat when you can have two?! The only problem is that you get torn between the two. 

    It will be interesting to see how the little Lyle Hess design goes with the junk rig. His designs have a reputation of being good sailing and cruising boats with a number of them having found their way to New Zealand. And of course Lynn and Larry Pardey sailed their 24 ft 'Serrafyn' around the world, which is basically a timber version of the same boat.

    Last modified: 30 May 2019 00:03 | Anonymous member
  • 29 May 2019 20:17
    Message # 7493786

    Hello everyone! 


    It gives me great pleasure to announce that my long search for a junk rigged boat has ended in …

    Not 1 , but TWO boats!  When it rains ... it pours I guess.


     I am so pleased to announce that I am in agreement to purchase Sabra, Michael Frankel’s Sunbird 32.  She is an absolute beauty , a proven ocean crossing vessel , the subject of a book that has been on my shelf for years! Michael and wife  Christl have taken wonderful care of the boat all these years.

    For the past few years she has mainly been their “snowbird retreat” in Florida …so , I am looking forward to going over things thoroughly and recomissioning next spring when I take possession of her. 

    As a few of you know , I "zeroed in" on the Sunbird 32 as a good possibility for my long term cruising vessel , And spent quite a bit of time and energy  checking out Matanie in Portugal ...all while quietly waiting and hoping that Sabra would come up for sale. 


    Needless to say ... I am very happy the way things have turned out.


    I am  traveling for a few weeks , so will post photos  of Sabra when I can.


    Boat # 2 came to me quite serendipitously , as a friend and fellow junk enthusiast here in The San Francisco Bay Area knew that I would most likely be interested. She is an Aquarius Pilot Cutter 24 , rigged as a single masted junk sloop. A somewhat rare bird that is a very heavily laid up , traditional looking full keel boat along the lines of a Falmouth Cutter or Seraffyn. 

    I’m posting 2 pictures of S/V Walrus …she is a stout beauty!  I am sure a few of you will agree that she appears under canvassed.  The previous owner did the conversion with a sail he found on craigslist. Once I have her out sailing , we can all decide if she needs more sail area …and the best way to go about it.

    I was not planning on buying two boats ...but , I DO need a boat to live on and sail until next spring. Once I take possession of Sabra , I can decide if I want to keep 2 boats  .... or then sell Walrus.


    I really want to thank Annie , Brian Kerslake , Jonathan Snodgrass and Vivien Gainsborough for all of their incredible kindness,  help , advice , and words of wisdom throughout my search.


    Fun times ahead!!!!! Xoxoxoxo


       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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