Nonsuch thoughts?

  • 24 Nov 2018 08:02
    Reply # 6930338 on 6930255
    Shemaya wrote:
    David wrote:

    My thought on the single masted Nonsuches (and the similar Wylies) is that they are for fair, settled conditions. With all the area in one huge sail, the simple trouble-free taking of multiple reefs is a must, and that's what you can't get in that style of sail. 


    David,

    it's my understanding that one reefs a Nonesuch by letting down the halyard so that the sail drops into the netting below the wishbone boom, where it rests without any further fuss. I could be wrong about that, but this is what I was told by a Nonesuch sailor who rowed his dinghy over to visit in a harbor a couple of years ago. I had suggested how easily he could convert his boat to JR, since he had come to visit because of the junk rig on my boat. But he said "why?" because his own reefing was so easy. I have pondered that question ever since…

    Other JR advantages do come to mind, but it sounds like ease of reefing might actually be comparable. Or is there more to it than that, with a Nonesuch? For example no weight of battens, to bring the sail down, and friction in the slides perhaps…

    Shemaya

    Looking at photos of the Nonsuch 26, I see two clew pennants, and possibly two luff pennants, for hauling down two very deep reefs, down to about a quarter of the full area. That's common practice on main-and-headsail boats as you get into a bit of a tangle and a lot more friction when you rig three or more pennants. In that case, you can get away with only two reefs by having a headsail that can be reefed or changed, but with a single sail, you can't. Compare that with JR, where we can let down four or five reefs, each reducing the sail area by smaller and more convenient steps. I wouldn't like to sail Weaverbird knowing that I only had two deep reefs available to me, as I would be overpowered or underpowered for much of the time. Yes, slide friction is an issue too, they only move freely when head to wind and jam up with the sail well out, so reefing off the wind isn't as straightforward as with JR.

    If the rig worked as well as your visitor claimed, we wouldn't have a number of Freedom owners breathing a sigh of relief after they'd converted to JR, is the way I look at it.

  • 24 Nov 2018 04:44
    Reply # 6930275 on 6929529

    Several years ago I was quite keen to purchase a well setup Nonsuch 30 which was located in Mexico, with the idea of sailing it back to NZ. Nothing actually came of this for all sorts of logistical reasons. However when recently discussing the vessel with a friend who is knowledgeable about American production boats he did say that the Nonsuch boats are prone to taking on a lot of moisture in the foam core of the hull and deck. So if looking to purchase a Nonsuch it would be very worthwhile having the boat checked out with a moisture meter. Apart from this one possible defect they seem to have a lot going for them. 

  • 24 Nov 2018 04:04
    Reply # 6930255 on 6929659
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Anonymous wrote:

    My thought on the single masted Nonsuches (and the similar Wylies) is that they are for fair, settled conditions. With all the area in one huge sail, the simple trouble-free taking of multiple reefs is a must, and that's what you can't get in that style of sail. 


    David,

    it's my understanding that one reefs a Nonesuch by letting down the halyard so that the sail drops into the netting below the wishbone boom, where it rests without any further fuss. I could be wrong about that, but this is what I was told by a Nonesuch sailor who rowed his dinghy over to visit in a harbor a couple of years ago. I had suggested how easily he could convert his boat to JR, since he had come to visit because of the junk rig on my boat. But he said "why?" because his own reefing was so easy. I have pondered that question ever since…

    Other JR advantages do come to mind, but it sounds like ease of reefing might actually be comparable. Or is there more to it than that, with a Nonesuch? For example no weight of battens, to bring the sail down, and friction in the slides perhaps…

    Shemaya

  • 23 Nov 2018 21:22
    Reply # 6930037 on 6929529

    Thanks chaps for your thoughts.  There's a 26 for sale but with a carbon mast (can't really be trimmed down) and the price is a bit steep to start chopping too much around.  If I were going to do something then for my first one I'd prefer something which has been done before as well!

    Since its the end of the season perhaps I should just be patient and keep looking.  Who knows what might appear in the New Year with mooring fees looming.


    Cheers

  • 23 Nov 2018 16:25
    Reply # 6929659 on 6929529

    My thought on the single masted Nonsuches (and the similar Wylies) is that they are for fair, settled conditions. With all the area in one huge sail, the simple trouble-free taking of multiple reefs is a must, and that's what you can't get in that style of sail. It's different with the two-masted Freedoms and similar boats with the same kind of rig - the rig is lower, and split into two sails, it's a little easier to reef.

    Around the coast of the UK, we get weather fronts coming through on regular basis, and settled weather is relatively rare. This is where the JR scores points, with its ease of adjustment to changeable weather. So, if you fancy a Nonsuch for its quality of build or any other reason, buy it and convert to JR. There's now a good track record for converting Freedoms to JR, but offhand I can't think of any Nonsuches. No reason why it can't be done, though.

  • 23 Nov 2018 16:00
    Reply # 6929634 on 6929529
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Ralph, for  some reason I had a look at the Nonsuch 30 in 2016, and then produced this little note on it (Under sailplans on 'my' JRA folder). I was surprised to find that the original sail area appeared to be bigger than in the spec. for the rig.
    Have a look. One surely can chop off a lot of mast if one converts to JR.

    Arne

    PS: To make the rig just a bit more seaworthy, one could make the sail with a bit shorter battens (6.0m?) and balance it with a little triangular mizzen right at the transom. This would make it easier to steer downwind.

    Last modified: 23 Nov 2018 17:10 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 23 Nov 2018 12:40
    Message # 6929529

    Not a JR I know but has anyone here got any experience of them and what are your thoughts?

    They seem to have many of the advantages of a JR and I gather were well built.  My intention would be coastal cruising around the UK and whilst really looking for a bilge keel JR its looking like 'beggars can't be choosers'!

    Many thanks


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