Does oar give way to sail?

  • 18 May 2022 20:12
    Reply # 12785241 on 12770175

    If you have sail up and are sailing along at 4 or 5 knots, why would you not give way to, say, a kayaker - paddling along at a couple knots?  Seems completely stupid not to...

  • 18 May 2022 05:40
    Reply # 12784387 on 12770175

    I have always assumed that, within the meaning of the act, a boat being propelled by oar or paddle is being 'powered'.  In this case the hp is human-power!  Surely the essence of a 'power' vessel is that it can manoeuvre more easily than a vessel under sail, particularly in very light conditions?  It also has more effective 'brakes'.

    Interesting about the French CG. although of course the maritime traffic in the English Channel/La Manche is complex and dense.  I have always, if I'm not in a Traffic Separation scheme and at all dubious about a ship's intentions or proximity, tried to aim for its stern until I am happy that we will comfortably miss each other. 

  • 07 May 2022 10:56
    Reply # 12771093 on 12770175

    "is that the Colregs make no particular distinction between a sailing vessel and an oar or paddle powered vessel, they are grouped together under one class "

    The word Oar only appears once in the colregs, under rule 25 on lighting! Ian's original point is quite correct. the explosion of tiny craft users needs to be incorporated into the regs and a big education effort started. In the meantime they are still a watercraft so just need to be sensible and know at least the basics. 

    Locally here in Ireland we keep out of the way of the small inter-island ferries as they are working professionally, much like a vessel engaged in fishing, and we are just out for the fun of it usually. However, that may not be technically correct. There's an interesting episode on one of Patrick Lane's sailing youtube's where he is told-off quite sternly by the French coastguard for politely changing course under sail for a larger power driven vessel. 

  • 06 May 2022 22:37
    Reply # 12770577 on 12770554
    Ian wrote:

    There have been discussions about this on other forums such as Sailing Anarchy. It seems to me that in UK/Europe the provisions of Colregs apply and kayaks, rowing-boats, stand-up paddle boards are all essentially "other" boats that give way to sailing craft. It must always be remembered though that no vessel has a right of way (maybe ferries do?), in a collision situation there is a stand on vessel and a give way vessel and everyone has a responsibility to avoid a collision. Biggest problem is that I'd guess most of these kayakers, and paddle-boarders will not have a clue about any of this and you'd just hope they have a tiny bit of sense and keep out of the way.

    In Ireland we have a government publication called The Recreational Craft Code of Practice (which includes basic Colregs), I often think I should have a box of them on the boat to hand out.

    My understanding, having being a maritime tutor, a Harbourmaster, and currently a Master of high speed passenger ferries is that the Colregs make no particular distinction between a sailing vessel and an oar or paddle powered vessel, they are grouped together under one class which all power driven vessels need to give way to.

    I think that if I was in a dinghy or kayak I would do the best I can to keep out of the way of a larger vessel which would potentially run me down, but the onus is on the Skipper of any type of vessel to do all they can to prevent a collision, so if in doubt give way. As the Master of a large high speed passenger ferry on the busiest harbour in New Zealand I know it is my responsibility to keep out of the way of any yacht, canoe, kayak, windsurfer, kite board. But if a ferry or any other large vessel is over 500 tons, then that vessel does have right of way within prescribed harbour limits.

  • 06 May 2022 22:27
    Reply # 12770554 on 12770175

    There have been discussions about this on other forums such as Sailing Anarchy. It seems to me that in UK/Europe the provisions of Colregs apply and kayaks, rowing-boats, stand-up paddle boards are all essentially "other" boats that give way to sailing craft. It must always be remembered though that no vessel has a right of way (maybe ferries do?), in a collision situation there is a stand on vessel and a give way vessel and everyone has a responsibility to avoid a collision. Biggest problem is that I'd guess most of these kayakers, and paddle-boarders will not have a clue about any of this and you'd just hope they have a tiny bit of sense and keep out of the way.

    In Ireland we have a government publication called The Recreational Craft Code of Practice (which includes basic Colregs), I often think I should have a box of them on the boat to hand out.

  • 06 May 2022 18:25
    Message # 12770175

    Does oar give way to sail; that is, does a canoe or kayak give way to sail, invariably?

    Further, does oar give way to sail, in conditions of restricted manoeuvrability; when a canoe draws inches, can easily stop, and can easily go astern?

    This is an issue which needs urgent clarification, given the explosion of canoe- and kayak-related use around some parts of the UK coast.

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