Watchkeeping, and the science of sleep

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  • 22 Jan 2013 12:11
    Reply # 1185742 on 1185455
    David Tyler wrote:And now!

    [... fanfare of trumpets ... ]

    The Tystie Get-U-Up single-handers' watchkeeping alarm
    And your next challenge is to upgrade it so that it also cooks your bacon and eggs.
  • 22 Jan 2013 03:52
    Reply # 1185459 on 1184100
    Gary Kepper wrote:
    The funny part about this napping and looking out arrangement is, you awaken and then with the fright of your life your into action and as quick as this all happens your yarning and napping again with a clear horizon for maybe 10mins :) 
    I find that you develop an extra sense. You're not sure why you have a sudden urge to get up and look out, but it's best to obey it. Often it's because you've sensed sounds that are below the threshold of hearing, as for a ship's propeller.
    Last modified: 22 Jan 2013 04:26 | Anonymous member
  • 22 Jan 2013 03:48
    Reply # 1185455 on 1116981
    And now!

    [... fanfare of trumpets ... ]

    The Tystie Get-U-Up single-handers' watchkeeping alarm

    Top left is a push on, push off power switch.
    Top centre is a low intensity 12v green LED to show that the unit is functioning and to act as an indicator to set the time on the dial.
    Centre is the runback timer, counting down, at about 4 minutes to go.

    Bottom left is a jumbo high intensity LED. This is intended for 2.4V operation, so needs a 680 ohm resistor in series with it.
    Right is a 90 dB pulsing piezo buzzer.
    Centre, the timer has run back to zero and the buzzer is sounding, the red LED is on, and the green LED is off.

    The whole thing is mounted above the centre window in the coachroof, near enough to the settees for me to hear, and requiring me to get up to a position where I can see out of the windows for a quick look around before I can switch it off or set it for a new time Unlike a kitchen timer, it will keep sounding until I switch it off. So often, I've woken up to find the kitchen timer has reached zero, and I'm not sure whether I slept through it or forgot to set it.

    [ Slieve, thanks for the tip about the timer, too late for me, but maybe some other single-hander will benefit]
    Last modified: 22 Jan 2013 20:19 | Anonymous member
  • 20 Jan 2013 12:08
    Reply # 1184100 on 1116981
    Deleted user
    It's quite a challenge single handing along a busy coastline. Shipping is certainly something to worry about but usually if I maintain a predictable course or make a firm adjustment and stay on a steady bearing the ships adjust theres accordingly and find that the real dangers are unmanned. Some things I have awoken to after a "nap" and had to take emendate action otherwise collision. 200l drum, log, sleeping whale, anchored fishing vessel with everyone asleep, parked ship waiting for me to clear there bow!!! fishing nets, waterspout within 20m running not quite parallel and seconds away from God only knows what:/ 

    The funny part about this napping and looking out arrangement is, you awaken and then with the fright of your life your into action and as quick as this all happens your yarning and napping again with a clear horizon for maybe 10mins :) 
  • 20 Jan 2013 09:50
    Reply # 1184051 on 1116981

    David, I really haven't followed this thread as I've never been interested in single-handing, but I suddenly realised that I should have made the obvious suggestion that you go to the dump/ tip/ rubbish recycling depot and get a clockwork timer from a broken tumble drier. They're 120 minute devices with heavy duty electrical contacts, and should be available in all civilised countries. These timers are also good for switching on a 'fridge, as you can give them a short burst and not forget to turn them off.

    Sorry I didn't mention this earlier, but I suppose it seemed too obvious.

    Cheers,  Slieve

    Last modified: 20 Jan 2013 09:53 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Jan 2013 05:06
    Reply # 1183482 on 1144534
    David Tyler wrote:Steering us back on topic:
    I was finding that my little RadioShack clockwork timer, and my little digital kitchen timer, aren't loud enough to wake me when I've got down into deep sleep. What I need is a clockwork run-back timer, maximum time two hours, wired to supply current to a loud buzzer and a bright flashing LED. All in a neat little enclosure and wired into the 12V supply. I'll work on it, when I can find an electronics supply shop. 
    I received my mail from England today. I had ordered a 120 minute mechanical runback timer from RS Components, since I couldn't track one down Stateside. This is a  DPDT switch, so you can use it to switch anything on, or off, when the timer returns to zero.


    I already have a 6" x 3" x 2" enclosure, a 90 dB pulsing piezo buzzer, a push on/push off switch and a red 12V LED. I'll go up to Radioshack tomorrow, and get a green LED. Then I'll wire it all up so that the green LED is on when the timer is ticking away (to show me that it's working), and the green LED goes off and the red LED and the buzzer come on when the timer returns to zero. I could add a bunch of bright red LEDs, in fact.

    Oh, and while I'm shopping, I must get a Round Tuit to complete the job.
  • 01 Dec 2012 05:06
    Reply # 1149939 on 1116981
    Deleted user
    I have an organic wake up alarm. Called "wifey".
    :D
  • 30 Nov 2012 19:56
    Reply # 1149663 on 1149407
    Robert Groves wrote:I have the same AIS kit. I'm new to this technology and have not even used it yet.
    Aha, that explains it.  If the alarm is anything like the one that Trevor has, it would wake the dead (but not Paul).  You may find it quite satisfactory, Bob.  But it will be a godsend around your foggy waters.  Pity icebergs don't use AIS :-)
  • 30 Nov 2012 13:09
    Reply # 1149407 on 1116981
    Deleted user
    Hi Paul

    Keep me in the loop on the developments as I have the same AIS kit. I'm new to this technology and have not even used it yet. Need to learn as much as I can to maximize its functionality.

    Thanks
  • 29 Nov 2012 18:29
    Reply # 1148779 on 1148579
    Robert Groves wrote:I have an Icom Radio and AIS. Will speak with the dealer in Lunenburg, when I get back there, to see if I can adapt the SeaTalk alarm to this unit as it seems to be ideal.
    Hi Bob,

    You can feel free to contact Frank Wallenwein directly. There is a contact page on the website. Frank is very approachable and willing to help.

    As I also have an ICOM (IC-M504) VHF & ICOM (MA500TR) AIS and I am discussing things with Frank right now. So if you like, I can cc you in on our discussions and you can then join in (David if you are interested the offer applies). What model is your radio/AIS?

    All the hardware and software on gadgetPool.de is opensource and GPL licensed and will run natively on under Linux (where applicable) and also on Windows. The source is available for download if you have the skills to use it. Frank is keen to develop and improve things and will work with his customers to do so. He wants feedback and ideas.
    Last modified: 29 Nov 2012 21:21 | Anonymous member
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