Electric outboard drive for small cruisers

  • 08 Apr 2020 19:14
    Reply # 8887793 on 8886814
    Anonymous wrote:

    I have the monitor that tells me what the solar panel is putting into the battery, but not what the motor is taking out. To check the power usage as Kurt has done, I should really be putting a 100A ammeter into the circuit, but ideally I'd need a waterproof one in the cockpit.

    I wanted to be able to keep an eye on how hard our alternator was working and bought a hall sensor monitor from Amazon, they can be had even more inexpensively on ebay.  The install is super simple and it reads accurately, as tested with my better quality meters (from memory the voltage was within .1V (display accuracy) and the amperage was within an amp at high currents).  Amazingly it even worked well at low currents, although I'd have to run tests again if you are interested in those numbers.  I was able to extend the distance from the sensor to the display by soldering in some slightly larger gauge wires.  Extending the wires didn't change the accuracy.  I'm sure you could come up with a waterproof cover.  They also sell AC versions of the meter so be careful if you order one.
  • 08 Apr 2020 07:23
    Reply # 8886814 on 8809939

    Even with the Tohatsu in a well, I used to turn it sideways to get off a pontoon against the breeze. There are huge advantages with a steerable motor.

    There are steerable electric pods around, I could have made a very neat installation with one of those, but then I'd be dragging a 10in 3-blade prop in place of the Tohatsu's 7.5in 3-blade prop.

    I have the monitor that tells me what the solar panel is putting into the battery, but not what the motor is taking out. To check the power usage as Kurt has done, I should really be putting a 100A ammeter into the circuit, but ideally I'd need a waterproof one in the cockpit.

  • 07 Apr 2020 23:18
    Reply # 8884684 on 8809939

    Weaverbird breaks free, gets hung on a railway bridge, has no damage, and you get to try out the new electric outboard rather than be stuck at home, and the weather was unseasonably nice.!?   Clearly, somewhere in your broad travels you pleased some sea goddess and she took pity on you.  

    Glad it turned out well.  I think you can add to your list of benefits that for a reasonable price you have a fancy steerable pod like the Volvo IPS, but for a far more reasonable price.  We used to have a little outboard that could be spun and I thought it made docking laughably fun, I bet it is even better with electric.

  • 07 Apr 2020 11:52
    Reply # 8883295 on 8809939

    Another sunny, "warm" day (at least 10˚C, if not more, Eric!), and the situation is back to normal. Yesterday afternoon I fixed the mooring, with a new 20mm nylon riser, a heavy weight halfway up it to keep it below the keels (I usually put a kellet onto the anchor rode, for the same reason, just below keel depth).

    This morning I went aboard, weighed anchor and moved Weaverbird back to the mooring. I must say that I think I'm going to actually enjoy this electric outboard, whereas I was tolerating, at best, the petrol outboard. It's quiet, instantly there ready to go when needed without worrying about whether it's not fully warmed up and might stall, and the control when approaching to pick up a mooring is vastly better.

    I can't recharge the batteries until we're out of lockdown and I can get back to installing the solar panel, so shouldn't do any more trials for the moment, but so far, so very good.

  • 06 Apr 2020 22:33
    Reply # 8882451 on 8881271
    Anonymous wrote:  At least it was sunny and warm.

    Bonsoir

    I have some doubts, under my standards, about the concept of a "sunny and warm" wether in the Highlands in early Appril !

    Well done.

    Eric

  • 06 Apr 2020 18:32
    Reply # 8882055 on 8809939

    hi david

    sometimes you need an excuse to go sailing!
    i'm glad that everything went well…

    ueli

  • 06 Apr 2020 18:02
    Reply # 8881974 on 8809939

    No damage; thanks for asking. Got away with it this time.

  • 06 Apr 2020 17:38
    Reply # 8881896 on 8809939

    No damage, I hope......

    Matthew


  • 06 Apr 2020 13:42
    Reply # 8881271 on 8809939

    Ahem. As it's turned out, the first trial was today, in slightly less than ideal circumstances. After a breezy night, a neighbour came to tell me that Weaverbird had broken free* and was trapped against the railway bridge. Out with a light inflatable tender, down the road, pump it up, get aboard, fit the motor to the bracket, connect it up - all at the double. That's my vigorous exercise for the day.

    I'm happy to report that there was plenty of power available to get her off against a moderate breeze, and control was good. I discovered that the magnetic cutout's lanyard wasn't quite long enough, and was tied with landsman's knots, which added to the fun.  At least it was sunny and warm.

    * I later found that the mooring strop had got caught around one of the keels and chafed through.

  • 04 Apr 2020 10:45
    Reply # 8878498 on 8809939

    Thanks, Kurt, that's encouraging. Now 'all' I have to do is to get through the current situation unscathed, complete my installation and be in a position to go out and get some real-world data myself.

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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