Minimalistic cruising multihulls

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  • 12 Mar 2019 19:20
    Reply # 7215429 on 7215405
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jeremy - I look forward to seeing the rigs that you, David Thatcher and others develop for your minimalistic multihulls.  I am going to try harder to find a buyer for Arion this year and would love to end my days aboard a small cat.  I like the idea of retaining a junk mainsail, as I have got so used to the delight of a sail that does not flog when you spill the wind from it, that will feather quietly, and which you can reef effortlessly.  I think the wide staying base of a cat will allow a three-point staying system with plenty of breathing space for the junk yard, while allowing headsails to be flown as well. I really want that lightweight battenless drifter. If the battened junk sail is slamming around in the swell, snatching hard on its gear, you can lower it and just fly the drifter.  

    Talking of Ernst Klaar, I met him in Darwin early in 1975.  His boat was up on the hard being repaired after Cyclone Tracy.  The boys, who grew up to be such wild spirits, were about 8 and 10, blonde-haired innocents!  Ernst told me he was going to sail across the Indian Ocean, and I remember looking at his portholes, which were little bits of ply that slid in grooves, like kitchen cupboard doors.  What I didn't realise is that traditional junks, with their good freeboard and buoyancy, combined with shallow draft, could not be compared to lead-mine western monohull yachts.  Jung Jung was a similar type, and I think the rig you evolved is ideal for ocean voyaging.  However, those days are over for me, hence my interest in minimalistic multihulls,  which also have different design parameters to heavily ballasted monohulls.  The use of light air canvas becomes much more rewarding in a boat capable of skimming across the water like a butterfly. 

    Hi Graham, 

    Before I get around to hands on development work on a Junk type shunting rig, the basic split sprit type one will have been tried and hopefully allowed some cruising time.....assuming plans work out - eg. my local sailmaker has agreed to make a start on the mains'l when he has the time, which should  provide enough power (along with the OB motor) to get out and around coastal waters here,  also to nearby islands.

    Additional sails in the way of staysails and possibly asymmetric headsails scrounged from skiffs(maybe a 49er)should provide some more go.

    Talking about a Junk main and 3point staying system on a tacking multi takes my mind back to the idea of a mast  closer to one hull, rather than midway(between hulls), with the other hull being utilised as a trimaran or Atlantic proa Ama on one tack, or a windward proa ama on the other and  having the Cabin structure extending out from each side of the hull that might be considered the vaca, hereby offering a similar accomodation layout to a trimaran, but with a less intrusive mast step, and  2 hulls rather than 3. 

    This was the idea being turned over when I made an attempt to speak with Pete Hil(about how sails worked on individual hulls)l and my mindset on asymmetry has since than been channeled towards shunters, to the exclusion of tacking multis.However, any monohull that I might ever build or own  from now on will have to be tiny, although Junk rigged, and likely with a short forward raked mast in the bow.

    On the difference between wooden Junks and "lead-mine keelers"...Ernst offered the following advice when speaking with him in Durban (after he had crossed the  Indian Ocean from Darwin and then sailed to Europe a few times, also having salvaged the treasure from Bassas de India Reef )... he said about boatbuilding " you are only building a boat for sailing on the sea,   its not like you are going to war in a bloody tank".

    There is probably some similarity between a Wharram cat and a double ended Junk without a ballast keel, both structurally and in consideration of canvas carried.

    Jung Jung did have a quick motion like a Wharram and in very light wind and lumpy water the mains'l really did slam around and snatch at the gear..This sure is reason to opt for rigging support, specially the mast is to be as tall as possible, and he able to carry some light unbattened cloth.




    Purpose of the pic posted previous to this message, was a test effort to see howdy recently re-arranged filing system is working- or not.... the intention is to be able to post more drawings and diagrams in future, rather than laborious attempts to explain technical ideas.
  • 12 Mar 2019 19:14
    Reply # 7215405 on 7205947
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jeremy - I look forward to seeing the rigs that you, David Thatcher and others develop for your minimalistic multihulls.  I am going to try harder to find a buyer for Arion this year and would love to end my days aboard a small cat.  I like the idea of retaining a junk mainsail, as I have got so used to the delight of a sail that does not flog when you spill the wind from it, that will feather quietly, and which you can reef effortlessly.  I think the wide staying base of a cat will allow a three-point staying system with plenty of breathing space for the junk yard, while allowing headsails to be flown as well. I really want that lightweight battenless drifter. If the battened junk sail is slamming around in the swell, snatching hard on its gear, you can lower it and just fly the drifter.  

    Talking of Ernst Klaar, I met him in Darwin early in 1975.  His boat was up on the hard being repaired after Cyclone Tracy.  The boys, who grew up to be such wild spirits, were about 8 and 10, blonde-haired innocents!  Ernst told me he was going to sail across the Indian Ocean, and I remember looking at his portholes, which were little bits of ply that slid in grooves, like kitchen cupboard doors.  What I didn't realise is that traditional junks, with their good freeboard and buoyancy, combined with shallow draft, could not be compared to lead-mine western monohull yachts.  Jung Jung was a similar type, and I think the rig you evolved is ideal for ocean voyaging.  However, those days are over for me, hence my interest in minimalistic multihulls,  which also have different design parameters to heavily ballasted monohulls.  The use of light air canvas becomes much more rewarding in a boat capable of skimming across the water like a butterfly. 

    Hi Graham, 

    Before I get around to hands on development work on a Junk type shunting rig, the basic split sprit type one will have been tried and hopefully allowed some cruising time.....assuming plans work out - eg. my local sailmaker has agreed to make a start on the mains'l when he has the time, which should  provide enough power (along with the OB motor) to get out and around coastal waters here,  also to nearby islands.

    Additional sails in the way of staysails and possibly asymmetric headsails scrounged from skiffs(maybe a 49er)should provide some more go.

    Talking about a Junk main and 3point staying system on a tacking multi takes my mind back to the idea of a mast  closer to one hull, rather than midway(between hulls), with the other hull being utilised as a trimaran or Atlantic proa Ama on one tack, or a windward proa ama on the other and  having the Cabin structure extending out from each side of the hull that might be considered the vaca, hereby offering a similar accomodation layout to a trimaran, but with a less intrusive mast step, and  2 hulls rather than 3. 

    This was the idea being turned over when I made an attempt to speak with Pete Hil(about how sails worked on individual hulls)l and my mindset on asymmetry has since than been channeled towards shunters, to the exclusion of tacking multis.However, any monohull that I might ever build or own  from now on will have to be tiny, although Junk rigged, and likely with a short forward raked mast in the bow.

    On the difference between wooden Junks and "lead-mine keelers"...Ernst offered the following advice when speaking with him in Durban (after he had crossed the  Indian Ocean from Darwin and then sailed to Europe a few times, also having salvaged the treasure from Bassas de India Reef )... he said about boatbuilding " you are only building a boat for sailing on the sea,   its not like you are going to war in a bloody tank".

    There is probably some similarity between a Wharram cat and a double ended Junk without a ballast keel, both structurally and in consideration of canvas carried.

    Jung Jung did have a quick motion like a Wharram and in very light wind and lumpy water the mains'l really did slam around and snatch at the gear..This sure is reason to opt for rigging support, specially the mast is to be as tall as possible, and he able to carry some light unbattened cloth.




  • 08 Mar 2019 10:12
    Reply # 7205947 on 7203504
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jeremy - I look forward to seeing the rigs that you, David Thatcher and others develop for your minimalistic multihulls.  I am going to try harder to find a buyer for Arion this year and would love to end my days aboard a small cat.  I like the idea of retaining a junk mainsail, as I have got so used to the delight of a sail that does not flog when you spill the wind from it, that will feather quietly, and which you can reef effortlessly.  I think the wide staying base of a cat will allow a three-point staying system with plenty of breathing space for the junk yard, while allowing headsails to be flown as well. I really want that lightweight battenless drifter. If the battened junk sail is slamming around in the swell, snatching hard on its gear, you can lower it and just fly the drifter.  

    Talking of Ernst Klaar, I met him in Darwin early in 1975.  His boat was up on the hard being repaired after Cyclone Tracy.  The boys, who grew up to be such wild spirits, were about 8 and 10, blonde-haired innocents!  Ernst told me he was going to sail across the Indian Ocean, and I remember looking at his portholes, which were little bits of ply that slid in grooves, like kitchen cupboard doors.  What I didn't realise is that traditional junks, with their good freeboard and buoyancy, combined with shallow draft, could not be compared to lead-mine western monohull yachts.  Jung Jung was a similar type, and I think the rig you evolved is ideal for ocean voyaging.  However, those days are over for me, hence my interest in minimalistic multihulls,  which also have different design parameters to heavily ballasted monohulls.  The use of light air canvas becomes much more rewarding in a boat capable of skimming across the water like a butterfly. 

    Hi Graham, 

    Before I get around to hands on development work on a Junk type shunting rig, the basic split sprit type one will have been tried and hopefully allowed some cruising time.....assuming plans work out - eg. my local sailmaker has agreed to make a start on the mains'l when he has the time, which should  provide enough power (along with the OB motor) to get out and around coastal waters here,  also to nearby islands.

    Additional sails in the way of staysails and possibly asymmetric headsails scrounged from skiffs(maybe a 49er)should provide some more go.

    Talking about a Junk main and 3point staying system on a tacking multi takes my mind back to the idea of a mast  closer to one hull, rather than midway(between hulls), with the other hull being utilised as a trimaran or Atlantic proa Ama on one tack, or a windward proa ama on the other and  having the Cabin structure extending out from each side of the hull that might be considered the vaca, hereby offering a similar accomodation layout to a trimaran, but with a less intrusive mast step, and  2 hulls rather than 3. 

    This was the idea being turned over when I made an attempt to speak with Pete Hil(about how sails worked on individual hulls)l and my mindset on asymmetry has since than been channeled towards shunters, to the exclusion of tacking multis.However, any monohull that I might ever build or own  from now on will have to be tiny, although Junk rigged, and likely with a short forward raked mast in the bow.

    On the difference between wooden Junks and "lead-mine keelers"...Ernst offered the following advice when speaking with him in Durban (after he had crossed the  Indian Ocean from Darwin and then sailed to Europe a few times, also having salvaged the treasure from Bassas de India Reef )... he said about boatbuilding " you are only building a boat for sailing on the sea,   its not like you are going to war in a bloody tank".

    There is probably some similarity between a Wharram cat and a double ended Junk without a ballast keel, both structurally and in consideration of canvas carried.

    Jung Jung did have a quick motion like a Wharram and in very light wind and lumpy water the mains'l really did slam around and snatch at the gear..This sure is reason to opt for rigging support, specially the mast is to be as tall as possible, and he able to carry some light unbattened cloth.



    Last modified: 08 Mar 2019 18:47 | Anonymous member
  • 07 Mar 2019 01:00
    Reply # 7203504 on 6886625

    Hi Jeremy - I look forward to seeing the rigs that you, David Thatcher and others develop for your minimalistic multihulls.  I am going to try harder to find a buyer for Arion this year and would love to end my days aboard a small cat.  I like the idea of retaining a junk mainsail, as I have got so used to the delight of a sail that does not flog when you spill the wind from it, that will feather quietly, and which you can reef effortlessly.  I think the wide staying base of a cat will allow a three-point staying system with plenty of breathing space for the junk yard, while allowing headsails to be flown as well. I really want that lightweight battenless drifter. If the battened junk sail is slamming around in the swell, snatching hard on its gear, you can lower it and just fly the drifter.  

    Talking of Ernst Klaar, I met him in Darwin early in 1975.  His boat was up on the hard being repaired after Cyclone Tracy.  The boys, who grew up to be such wild spirits, were about 8 and 10, blonde-haired innocents!  Ernst told me he was going to sail across the Indian Ocean, and I remember looking at his portholes, which were little bits of ply that slid in grooves, like kitchen cupboard doors.  What I didn't realise is that traditional junks, with their good freeboard and buoyancy, combined with shallow draft, could not be compared to lead-mine western monohull yachts.  Jung Jung was a similar type, and I think the rig you evolved is ideal for ocean voyaging.  However, those days are over for me, hence my interest in minimalistic multihulls,  which also have different design parameters to heavily ballasted monohulls.  The use of light air canvas becomes much more rewarding in a boat capable of skimming across the water like a butterfly.   

  • 06 Mar 2019 22:53
    Reply # 7203218 on 7199417
    Anonymous wrote:
    Jeremy Walker wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    I thought I would put any updates about my little catamaran build here, seen as how my posts are so few and far apart there is no point in a separate thread, and it is after all a minimalist cruising multihull.

    Progress has been a bit slower than I would like, but that is to be expected with all the other things we have going on in life. There has also been a hiatus of several weeks whist I have been organising the sale of Footprints which has included making a new sail cover for her. Anyway this afternoon I finally managed to get in several hours of work and did the initial fairing of the plywood on the hulls, cleaning up all the rough edges and tidying up the chines. So, I now have two very floatable objects. If ever we have a flood up here on the top of our hill I have the makings of a double canoe so as to ensure our survival!

    The next step now is filling of all the screw holes, and other areas of filler needed, a good sanding, and then into fiberglass. Pictures below of what are looking like two slender and potentially very fast hulls. 


    Very pretty, David.  I can see why you might not want to put a mast in each bow, though.  It will be most interesting to see what rig you eventually use.

    Since last posting on this thread, when I asserted that a stayed rig would be a lighter option, a bit of thought has been given to the 'junk reefing wingsail' mentioned earlier on.

    Shrouds and a forestay, along with back staying via the yard, battens and Chinese sheet system have helped me with weight reduction aloft(on Jung Jung), so a follow-up on this(semi standing rigging) has been looked at in the way of creating spars and frame from bamboo and epoxy/carbon fibre, with dyneema lines in tension.

    First and before getting down to that, I need to finish and go through experimental trials

    of the minimalistic double luff sail on my cruising Pahi/proa.

    Minimalistic has got to apply to a sail that has historically (in the case eastern Pacific shunting Oceanic Pahi) been described as  being "a big square mat that is supported by long bamboo poles and ropes of Hibiscus bark, and what is of particular to a sailor is that the tack does not differ from that in our boats in Europe, and the sheet is fixed one side or the other with a small wooden pin.

    This quadrilateral type sail is not much different to the foresail  that I used on my junk Jung Jung - except for the double luff arrangement.

    Cost and labour required for this rig is on the minimalistic side, but if bamboo can be used for a wingsail frame, I might just be worthwhile to continue with the idea of a Targa frame support for a telescopically assembled mast on a double canoe. 

    Ah Jung Jung - I still have a soft spot for that boat and her rig.  I was always hoping to come across the cold-moulded Jung Jung 11 one day.  I liked Jung Jung's ability to set that light-weather quadrilateral foresail, and also to run with her little storm jib in heavy weather.  The deeply reefed foresail of a junk schooner will serve as a storm jib, but that lovely light weather sail would be hard to replicate.  Cambered junk sails and a generous sail plan are an effective way of getting light-weather performance, but nothing can compare to a battenless lightweight drifter.  Jung Jung remains a vision of poetic beauty and superb function in my mind. 

    Speaking of a battenless lightweight drifter... I am reminded that Ernst Klaar(owner/master of the Junk Maria Jose) told me that his "secret weapon" was a drifter. and the taller mast I fitted when in England was intended to take such a sail.

    Both the Maria Jose and Jung Jung had short rigs and shoal draught, along with payload/internal ballast being largely contributive to righting moment, so, in comparison, the current crop of Junk rigged keelers  can benefit from a more generous mast and battened foresail, with their ability to cope with increased top hamper.

     

    As things like shoal draught still apply for me now, a  short rig remains a requirement, but for reason of reduced cost, rather than for the mast to remain standing after a knockdown. Otherwise, there area number of factors which I think can be carried over to a multihull configuration.  




    Last modified: 06 Mar 2019 22:57 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Mar 2019 23:48
    Reply # 7199417 on 7199406
    Jeremy Walker wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    I thought I would put any updates about my little catamaran build here, seen as how my posts are so few and far apart there is no point in a separate thread, and it is after all a minimalist cruising multihull.

    Progress has been a bit slower than I would like, but that is to be expected with all the other things we have going on in life. There has also been a hiatus of several weeks whist I have been organising the sale of Footprints which has included making a new sail cover for her. Anyway this afternoon I finally managed to get in several hours of work and did the initial fairing of the plywood on the hulls, cleaning up all the rough edges and tidying up the chines. So, I now have two very floatable objects. If ever we have a flood up here on the top of our hill I have the makings of a double canoe so as to ensure our survival!

    The next step now is filling of all the screw holes, and other areas of filler needed, a good sanding, and then into fiberglass. Pictures below of what are looking like two slender and potentially very fast hulls. 


    Very pretty, David.  I can see why you might not want to put a mast in each bow, though.  It will be most interesting to see what rig you eventually use.

    Since last posting on this thread, when I asserted that a stayed rig would be a lighter option, a bit of thought has been given to the 'junk reefing wingsail' mentioned earlier on.

    Shrouds and a forestay, along with back staying via the yard, battens and Chinese sheet system have helped me with weight reduction aloft(on Jung Jung), so a follow-up on this(semi standing rigging) has been looked at in the way of creating spars and frame from bamboo and epoxy/carbon fibre, with dyneema lines in tension.

    First and before getting down to that, I need to finish and go through experimental trials

    of the minimalistic double luff sail on my cruising Pahi/proa.

    Minimalistic has got to apply to a sail that has historically (in the case eastern Pacific shunting Oceanic Pahi) been described as  being "a big square mat that is supported by long bamboo poles and ropes of Hibiscus bark, and what is of particular to a sailor is that the tack does not differ from that in our boats in Europe, and the sheet is fixed one side or the other with a small wooden pin.

    This quadrilateral type sail is not much different to the foresail  that I used on my junk Jung Jung - except for the double luff arrangement.

    Cost and labour required for this rig is on the minimalistic side, but if bamboo can be used for a wingsail frame, I might just be worthwhile to continue with the idea of a Targa frame support for a telescopically assembled mast on a double canoe. 

    Ah Jung Jung - I still have a soft spot for that boat and her rig.  I was always hoping to come across the cold-moulded Jung Jung 11 one day.  I liked Jung Jung's ability to set that light-weather quadrilateral foresail, and also to run with her little storm jib in heavy weather.  The deeply reefed foresail of a junk schooner will serve as a storm jib, but that lovely light weather sail would be hard to replicate.  Cambered junk sails and a generous sail plan are an effective way of getting light-weather performance, but nothing can compare to a battenless lightweight drifter.  Jung Jung remains a vision of poetic beauty and superb function in my mind. 
  • 04 Mar 2019 23:22
    Reply # 7199406 on 7186993
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    I thought I would put any updates about my little catamaran build here, seen as how my posts are so few and far apart there is no point in a separate thread, and it is after all a minimalist cruising multihull.

    Progress has been a bit slower than I would like, but that is to be expected with all the other things we have going on in life. There has also been a hiatus of several weeks whist I have been organising the sale of Footprints which has included making a new sail cover for her. Anyway this afternoon I finally managed to get in several hours of work and did the initial fairing of the plywood on the hulls, cleaning up all the rough edges and tidying up the chines. So, I now have two very floatable objects. If ever we have a flood up here on the top of our hill I have the makings of a double canoe so as to ensure our survival!

    The next step now is filling of all the screw holes, and other areas of filler needed, a good sanding, and then into fiberglass. Pictures below of what are looking like two slender and potentially very fast hulls. 


    Very pretty, David.  I can see why you might not want to put a mast in each bow, though.  It will be most interesting to see what rig you eventually use.

    Since last posting on this thread, when I asserted that a stayed rig would be a lighter option, a bit of thought has been given to the 'junk reefing wingsail' mentioned earlier on.

    Shrouds and a forestay, along with back staying via the yard, battens and Chinese sheet system have helped me with weight reduction aloft(on Jung Jung), so a follow-up on this(semi standing rigging) has been looked at in the way of creating spars and frame from bamboo and epoxy/carbon fibre, with dyneema lines in tension.

    First and before getting down to that, I need to finish and go through experimental trials

    of the minimalistic double luff sail on my cruising Pahi/proa.

    Minimalistic has got to apply to a sail that has historically (in the case eastern Pacific shunting Oceanic Pahi) been described as  being "a big square mat that is supported by long bamboo poles and ropes of Hibiscus bark, and what is of particular to a sailor is that the tack does not differ from that in our boats in Europe, and the sheet is fixed one side or the other with a small wooden pin.

    This quadrilateral type sail is not much different to the foresail  that I used on my junk Jung Jung - except for the double luff arrangement.

    Cost and labour required for this rig is on the minimalistic side, but if bamboo can be used for a wingsail frame, I might just be worthwhile to continue with the idea of a Targa frame support for a telescopically assembled mast on a double canoe. 

  • 25 Feb 2019 23:50
    Reply # 7186993 on 7181028
    Anonymous wrote:

    I thought I would put any updates about my little catamaran build here, seen as how my posts are so few and far apart there is no point in a separate thread, and it is after all a minimalist cruising multihull.

    Progress has been a bit slower than I would like, but that is to be expected with all the other things we have going on in life. There has also been a hiatus of several weeks whist I have been organising the sale of Footprints which has included making a new sail cover for her. Anyway this afternoon I finally managed to get in several hours of work and did the initial fairing of the plywood on the hulls, cleaning up all the rough edges and tidying up the chines. So, I now have two very floatable objects. If ever we have a flood up here on the top of our hill I have the makings of a double canoe so as to ensure our survival!

    The next step now is filling of all the screw holes, and other areas of filler needed, a good sanding, and then into fiberglass. Pictures below of what are looking like two slender and potentially very fast hulls. 


    Very pretty, David.  I can see why you might not want to put a mast in each bow, though.  It will be most interesting to see what rig you eventually use.
  • 24 Feb 2019 03:58
    Reply # 7181028 on 6886625

    I thought I would put any updates about my little catamaran build here, seen as how my posts are so few and far apart there is no point in a separate thread, and it is after all a minimalist cruising multihull.

    Progress has been a bit slower than I would like, but that is to be expected with all the other things we have going on in life. There has also been a hiatus of several weeks whist I have been organising the sale of Footprints which has included making a new sail cover for her. Anyway this afternoon I finally managed to get in several hours of work and did the initial fairing of the plywood on the hulls, cleaning up all the rough edges and tidying up the chines. So, I now have two very floatable objects. If ever we have a flood up here on the top of our hill I have the makings of a double canoe so as to ensure our survival!

    The next step now is filling of all the screw holes, and other areas of filler needed, a good sanding, and then into fiberglass. Pictures below of what are looking like two slender and potentially very fast hulls. 

  • 11 Dec 2018 22:57
    Reply # 6955986 on 6955816
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jeremy,

    I think explaining the dynamics of the pacific proa will help the monohull family to make better sense of it all....

    Only true Pacific Proas of all multihulls have almost Zero "aka" (cross beam) loads, Cats and Tris put huge loads on their cross beams, forcing them to be seriously engineered resulting in ether heavy or expensive beams.

    With the mast placed on top of the "vaka" (big hull on a proa) and a shroud connected to the "ama" (small windward hull). Mast compression is over the hull, vs over the akas on cats. Aka compression as a result of heeling is totally eliminated, since akas are to windward and shroud is lifting the windward ama, vs trimarans that are loading leeward akas more and more as wind builds, since the leeward ama on a trimaran is, counteracting wind and heeling forces. These heavy loads are some of the biggest problems in multihull design, resulting in expensive engineering. 

    Pacific proas have none of this due to a genius design of a vessel that excepts the wind from one side only. "A shunting boat", meaning it can sail in both directions, as long as the ama is to windward. The mast is on the vaka and the shroud lifts the ama, for that is a pacific proa..... And that friends is the simplest, cheapest, lightest and strongest multi possible. Just remember a stayed mast is the foundation of a low stress vessel, now, low stress is what adds strength, by reducing weight..................... 

    Very interesting rig you're working on, Good Luck Jeremy.

    all d best.

    rael.

    Rael, thanks for the 'good luck' wishes.

    As for the theory on  pac proas.... I have been meaning to make comment on your 'la shunk' thread, so will take this as a cue to go ahead (refer that thread for post to come). Current build is a Pacific/Oceanic double canoe that is to be rigged a shunter, because the companionway hatch needs to be kept on the lee side of a dodger facing the weather, and at the same time allows the bigger of the two hulls to be the primary displacement hull, to lee.

    Al weight to w/ward of this lee hull's CB, can be carried by a shroud( if rig is stayed), or elelse there could be a cantilever mast stepped in an 'aka' structure between the hulls.

    Going with a stayed split rig ( as per the older type Kanak and Tuamauto double canoes) will no doubt be the lighter and less costly way to go, so is what I can plan on for the immediate future.

    Beam of this Pahi will be 5M, and as designed and built so far, will be joined by wooden kiato( traditional 'cross spars' as they are known by pacific people), but as already mentioned, a structure carrying rig load from a cantilevered mast ( something akin to Richard Newick's akas on proa Cheers, but fabricated rather than laminated using wood) is a possibility, if testing on a small prototype  shows promise.

    Using traditional kiato keep's a lid on costs, and allows me to fit the individual hulls into tight spaces and onto small trailers while in the building stage. Also, the beam dimension can be varied, If I really need a bit more, or possibly a bit less, rather.

    Weight is relatively low, since no heavy ballast is required for stability, given that all crew, stores, gear and rig, serve to keep the craft right side up - like a catamaran, except that I have the option of packing stuff in such a way as to lighten the smaller hull (the ama) if it is beneficial to do so. 

    More important to me, is that I can build with and live with solid wooden boards, in the way of cabin soles, furnishings and slatted decks, rather than be so obsessed by weight reduction, that I begin looking at a tramp stretched between 2 hulls, or even worse; a tramp stretched between one hull and an Ama that has no internal volume for living space.

    As a teenager, living life again, a double canoe, minimalist in the extreme, would be the way to go, now the closest I'l get to that, might as well be an experiment in what is achievable, using our/my currently available resources.

    Agreed, Oceanic people using stone or shell tools to shape, then fasten and rig their canoes with vegetable fibre, developed amazing craft..... Ive spent a major part of my life in quest of knowledge covering this subject. As well, the development of a bamboo raft into a sailing platform with a battened reef-able Junk sail, is equally interesting.

    Dynamics of form stability apply equally to both the bamboo raft  and  the canoe/raft outrigger hybrid.

    Still, the double canoe slots right in to this scheme of floating craft, and from what we know, is the better load carrier of the lot, if sailing performance is required well.......as you like to say"keep on shunting". 

     




    Last modified: 11 Dec 2018 23:35 | Anonymous member
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       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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