Wave Rover Project

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  • 23 Aug 2021 16:41
    Reply # 10950488 on 10944653
    Anonymous wrote:

    What do I think of it? Interesting! It's remarkable how close the dimensions are to Weaverbird, a boat that I'd have been happy to take to the Azores, and thence to Canada - if I'd been 20 years younger. The displacement is about the same, the LWL is more but the LOA is less than Weaverbird; and the maximum beam is a little less but the waterline beam is a little more. Call me biassed if you like, but I suspect that the SibLim hull form would be more comfortable at sea, with less pounding to windward. I'd prefer more of a V section in the fore parts, flattening out towards the stern - like SibLim. OK, call me even more biassed, but I'd put twin keels on the SibLim 7m instead of bilgeboards, for more internal stowage room, and build that as an absolute minimum ocean cruiser. Twin keels make a lot of sense for this project, for all the reasons given.

    I now think that I could have got away with the Haswing Protruar 2.0 outboard; the 5.0 gives more than enough power for an auxiliary for a boat of this size and the 2.0 would be easier to stow on a boat intended primarily for long passages under sail. It's still 24V, so a 60 cell solar panel of 275 - 300W nominal power would be needed to charge the battery.

    The accommodation is pretty much the same as Weaverbird's, and I think it's a good choice. I don't see a heads, though, and would put in a composting heads like Weaverbird's. Just a solids bucket, no need for a urine separator, at sea the bucket-and-chuckit principle is fine for liquids.

    I transited the Panama Canal in company with a 19ft boat, it verged on a joke to get it through, and would agree that trucking across makes much more sense. I'd look at Mexico as a possible shorter trucking route.

    I couldn't live with that companionway, but that's a personal choice.


    David:

         I think the companionway design follows Roger Taylor's philosophy....keeping the boat more or less water tight, and with positive buoyancy.   Roger's experiences with capsize on an earlier boat if I recall correctly led him to abandon the drop board and slider paradigm because when inverted even the best dropboard / slider system gushes a LOT of water.  If Wave Rover I was not inspired by Roger Taylor,  I'd be surprised, and this new boat seems to take it to the next level with the junk rig.    Small monohulls are subject to knockdown and capsize in storm conditions which are likely to be encountered on such a long voyage.   This is a really small boat for such a voyage.  My biggest concern looking at the design is weather there is enough cargo/ballast to right the boat if knocked down or capsized, and will it be well enough secured.  The cargo/ballast will be consumed on a voyage, and is there a provision for replacing it with sea water to maintain righting ability.  The full width coach roof adds a lot of displacement up high where it needs to be for righting, so I would hope and assume the boat is engineered with this in mind.

        I agree with you on the head........ and suspect that this is his thinking as well.  Direct deposit would be a good option on a catamaran or trimaran, and eliminate this issue except in port, but could be a real safety challenge on a monohull.   Most MOBs are caused by pissing over the side or stern.    Bucket and  chuckit for both liquids and solids is probably a viable alternative at sea.

          Solar enough panels along with a reasonably size LIPO battery bank would be attractive for propulsion in windless conditions when you have enough sun.  I wonder if any electric outboards have regen?    To me the attractiveness of an electric outboard  is elimination of the salt water cooled engine issues.... It has always seemed insane to me to use salt water in the cooling system of a metal engine, not to mention having through hulls below the waterline.   In an ideal situation a boat would have no hull penetrations below WL.  


                                                    H.W.
  • 21 Aug 2021 04:38
    Reply # 10945324 on 10943676

    Wave Rover got me hooked on the Contessa 26; Roger Taylor got me hooked on Junk Rig.  My project consists mostly of incorporating their great ideas into my boat, and “improving” (I hope) on them.

    Can’t wait to follow Allan’s videos again.

  • 20 Aug 2021 21:17
    Reply # 10944653 on 10943676

    What do I think of it? Interesting! It's remarkable how close the dimensions are to Weaverbird, a boat that I'd have been happy to take to the Azores, and thence to Canada - if I'd been 20 years younger. The displacement is about the same, the LWL is more but the LOA is less than Weaverbird; and the maximum beam is a little less but the waterline beam is a little more. Call me biassed if you like, but I suspect that the SibLim hull form would be more comfortable at sea, with less pounding to windward. I'd prefer more of a V section in the fore parts, flattening out towards the stern - like SibLim. OK, call me even more biassed, but I'd put twin keels on the SibLim 7m instead of bilgeboards, for more internal stowage room, and build that as an absolute minimum ocean cruiser. Twin keels make a lot of sense for this project, for all the reasons given.

    I now think that I could have got away with the Haswing Protruar 2.0 outboard; the 5.0 gives more than enough power for an auxiliary for a boat of this size and the 2.0 would be easier to stow on a boat intended primarily for long passages under sail. It's still 24V, so a 60 cell solar panel of 275 - 300W nominal power would be needed to charge the battery.

    The accommodation is pretty much the same as Weaverbird's, and I think it's a good choice. I don't see a heads, though, and would put in a composting heads like Weaverbird's. Just a solids bucket, no need for a urine separator, at sea the bucket-and-chuckit principle is fine for liquids.

    I transited the Panama Canal in company with a 19ft boat, it verged on a joke to get it through, and would agree that trucking across makes much more sense. I'd look at Mexico as a possible shorter trucking route.

    I couldn't live with that companionway, but that's a personal choice.

  • 20 Aug 2021 19:53
    Reply # 10944453 on 10943676

    In profile it's got more than a hint of Chris Morejohn's Hogfish and in cross section a bit Siblim??? I think it's very exciting and worth building a model. My "next boat" is now either the Hogfish28, a Siblim, an Egret Sharpie or this Wave Rover. Bilge keels are a big bonus for me as I can dry out on rocky beaches here to do maintenance or to get some sleep even and the Hogfish looks a little vulnerable in that respect with its flat bottom. Very interested to see what David Tyler thinks of this design...

  • 20 Aug 2021 17:15
    Reply # 10944154 on 10943676

    He told me he is going to have his wife enroll him as a JRA member this w/e.

    Let's see.

  • 20 Aug 2021 16:37
    Reply # 10944117 on 10943676

    I've followed his efforts, and was disappointed when Covid put an end to his dream...or so it seemed.   It appeared to me that he followed Roger Taylor's philosophy in his modifications, but stopped short of the junk rig.  

        This new endeavor is exciting, and appeals to me in a number of ways beyond just the junk rig.  It looks in the sketch like he opted for a full width cabin..... a great feature!... It reminds me of a mini Badger... though I presume with a transom stern.  I look forward to following this project........ and the adventure, of which the project is an integral part.


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  • 20 Aug 2021 12:53
    Reply # 10943680 on 10943676

    I am really looking forward to following his progress and as you say, It will do a lot to bring junk rig to the attention of the general sailing community.

    Paul


  • 20 Aug 2021 12:46
    Message # 10943676

    With over 30,000 subscribers and more than 2,400,000 views of his videos it would seem that the western junk rig we all love is about to get some serious publicity as Alan from the Sailing Wave Rover YouTube channel begins his new venture.

    I, for one, will be fascinated to see the commentary and opinions of JRA members in this thread as the project progresses.

    The video announcing the project can be seen here.


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