Benford Badger sister ship for sale Sea of Cortez Mex.

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  • 16 Apr 2019 08:05
    Reply # 7284676 on 7283131

    OK, Badger was planked up in lauan, quite a lot heavier than either okoume or fir, and Zebedee in meranti, which according to my source  is the same thing.  However, the meranti ply I've seen here is much coarser and heavier than the luan ply we used on Badger.  Whatever.  Supposedly 35lbs a cube: keruing is 46 lbs a cube.  Both boats were built with solid, wooden masts and both had - horror of horrors - teak decks!!  Badger had the wing keel, Zeb 4ft 1in draught, with lead on the long, shallow keel.  Of the two, Badger is the stiffer.  This isn't subjective: we very, very rarely sailed with the rail in the water on Badger, Zebedee frequently sails rail down to windward and he flips it under when he does a fast gybe, so it's more than just heeling to the extra power of the cambered sail.  The 40 footer has no extra weight on deck and carbon fibre masts; logically she wouldn't heel more.  What's more, by the time you have the rail in the water, the boats really, really don't want to go over any further.

    Camber first, rudder a long way second.  Alan and I have come to the conclusion that the rudder was shaped back to front.  If you see it off the boat, on the bench, without its fittings and are used to a conventional rudder, this isn't as insane as it first sounds.  Anyway, whatever the reason, the rudder was fine forward and thick aft.  I doubt the one you are looking at has the same issue.  It has made an enormous difference to the way Zebedee sails: but it would, wouldn't it?  However, the cambered sails were the first noticeable improvement and it was pretty dramatic.

    I'm sorry to hear about the Pearson. But forget the sunk cost fallacy (I'm not sure exactly what that is, but can guess.)  It's only money - you can earn more - but we are talking about your life and you can't earn any more of that. If I were you, which I'm not, I'd buy the dory and sail it back to New England.  The Trade Wind route.  Rent your house out.  If you do the sums of how much it will cost to ship it back across the country and compare that with the voyage back, done simply and avoiding most of the flesh pots, I doubt there'd be a lot in it.  And you can sell some of the gizmos.  There's a reason the boat is where she is: she's just asking to sail across the Pacific.  Why waste such an opportunity?


    Last modified: 16 Apr 2019 08:22 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Apr 2019 08:26
    Reply # 7284679 on 7284676
    Annie wrote:  Both boats were built with solid, wooden masts and both had - horror of horrors - teak decks!!

    Good point, Annie. This boat has carbon masts, which ought to be the lightest of all possibilities, and will help the stability. I don't know what method Jay is proposing, but I'd do what I used to do when I worked at Kemp Masts and went out to check the stability of first-off production boats for which we'd supplied a rig: attach a load cell to a halyard, attach that to the dock, haul the boat down to 30˚ allowing it to float away from the dock at the same time so that the halyard remains vertical. Record the load cell readings and the horizontal distance between the halyard and the foot of the mast, and compute the actual righting moment. There's nothing like knowing the actual numbers.

    I'm sorry to hear about the Pearson. But forget the sunk cost fallacy(I'm not sure exactly what that is, but can guess.)  It's only money -you can earn more - but we are talking about your life and you can't earn any more of that. If I were you, which I'm not, I'd buy the dory and sail it back to New England.  The Trade Wind route.  Rent your house out.  If you do the sums of how much it will cost to ship it back across the country and compare that with the voyage back, done simply and avoiding most of the flesh pots, I doubt there'd be a lot in it.  There's a reason the boat is where she is: she's just asking to sail across the Pacific.  Why waste such an opportunity!!

    Yup. If the intention was to go voyaging, this boat is in a good starting position. Assuming she's sound and in working order, the flat sails won't be a disadvantage across the Pacific, and when you get to Kiwiland, those fine folks down there will give you help and advice in making a cambered suit of sails, I'm sure!

    Alternatively, how about the Mexico>Hawai'i>Seattle> truck to Great Lakes route, if you really want to get back to New England?

    Last modified: 16 Apr 2019 10:03 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Apr 2019 18:59
    Reply # 7285447 on 7278467

    I'm convinced that I need to at least go take a look at it.  If everything checks out, I have some soul searching to do.  There is a slight issue with my timing.  I won't be ready to untie the lines for a while yet.  But I could keep the boat there for a few years - the San Carlos area is supposedly affordable.  It may actually be cheaper to keep it there and fly out a couple times a year than to pay for a mooring here in Connecticut.

    A few long vacations to Mexico during the New England winters can't be a bad thing. And I'm told the Sea of Cortez is beautiful, even if the actual sailing is fussy.

    Then the trade winds to Whangarei? 

    Last modified: 16 Apr 2019 21:01 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Apr 2019 21:11
    Reply # 7285648 on 7285447

    It's never the right time to untie the lines.

    Yup, downwind all the way to Whangarei.  Ask Alan - he sailed from the Sea of Cortez and never looked back.

  • 17 Apr 2019 22:17
    Reply # 7291335 on 7278467

    Scott,

    Do you remember discussion of a certain beautifully built Badger on Lake Champlain? I don't think it's looking for a new home this year, but there has been talk about in the not too distant future. I'm not sure in what ways these two boats are different, but perhaps worth a thought? Being so close!

    Shemaya

  • 18 Apr 2019 02:00
    Reply # 7291642 on 7278467

    Oh, Shemaya.  You'll give me option paralysis.  I'll store that idea away -  it's always good to remember when boat shopping the superphrase: "There are other boats than this one."


    Annie - out of curiosity,  do you have the specifics on the rudder you put on Badger?

    Last modified: 18 Apr 2019 02:00 | Anonymous member
  • 18 Apr 2019 16:52
    Reply # 7292519 on 7278467
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    "There are other boats than this one."

    That is very true, Scott. It has happened to me quite a few times that the perfect boat has popped up at a not-perfect moment  -  that is, when I was in the middle of  a rigging project. So far, I have managed to turn away from the temptation and finish my projects, and only looked around when I felt ready for it. It is sad to see when people jump from one half-finished project to the next, and the next. So much wasted work.

    I hope you regain courage, and manage to get your project back on the rails again.

    Arne

    Last modified: 18 Apr 2019 22:58 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
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