Teak Strip Decking Advice

  • 16 Sep 2018 21:53
    Reply # 6671691 on 6668824
    Anonymous wrote:

    Some feedback, please. I have a teak strip deck on Elsie N (soon to be "Hobbit") laid in graphite epoxy, held in place by screws and washers for spacing and hold down. Te original thickness was 1/8". It is now about 3/32" with epoxy ridges. (Good non-skid.) Here and there, the teak is pulling away from the epoxy. Since removing the winter cover, I have noticed them. After a rain, many of them close up.
    I wonder if my lovely deck has reached it's best before date and needs to be removed or glassed (or dyneled) over.

    Is there some compound I could squeeze into these narrow cracks to ge sone more life out of this deck?

    Annie, I remember you telling me you wet Badger's deck down once a day with sea water.

    Any suggestions? I did a search of our files without finding anything.

    Cheers, Jim



    Hi Jim

    The first thing to remember is that the teak is a handsome, low-maintenance non-skid finish.  One of the best ways to maintain it is to keep it well impregnated with salt.  Your boat has been out of the water through numerous freeze-thaw cycles in Nova Scotia's notoriously boat-unfriendly climate for about ten years now, so it's hardly surprising there is some damage. But it's not structural.  It's cosmetic.  You've far more important things to do and a complete refit to the decks.  Launch your boat and go sailing.

    Minor splits in the teak can be ignored.  Launch your boat and go sailing.

    Lifting planks can have a bit of graphite/epoxy dribbled under the edges.  Weight it down.  Clean off the excess.  Launch your boat and go sailing.

    Planks that are actually coming away can be chiselled out.  Fit a new piece of teak or iroko between the existing epoxy/graphite boundaries.  Launch your boat and go sailing.

    Trinidad has its own teak plantations.  Teak is cheaper there than oregon.  Launch your boat and go sailing down to Trinidad, buy some teak and do any repairs necessary there.

    In short, Jim, you've owned Elsie for 6 years now.  You can always find something else to do on her, but in the meantime like all of us, you aren't getting any younger.  You've done enough on her now.  Take off the old name, put on the new and launch your boat and go sailing.  At this rate I'll be sailing before you are!!!

  • 16 Sep 2018 21:20
    Reply # 6671650 on 6670022
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Jim,

    ... I used a product called Elastodeck 6001 AL (a liquid applied Polyurethane elastomer) on the plywood decks of the boat I The secret to a long life for this product is to make sure that the non skid sand is applied to "refusal", that is it is a complete cover for the wet under layer, and that it is properly over coated. If this is not done the product can wear quite quickly.

    If i used the clear coating snd added the non-skid sand, what is the appearance of the teak underneath?
  • 16 Sep 2018 21:07
    Reply # 6671632 on 6668824

    Thanks for the feedback.

    I will have a look at Elastodeck for consideration. Interesting.

    One scenario I was thinking I could do.

    Sand the coach-roof smooth. Wipe with acetone. Level any dips with epoxy filler. Glass the coach-roof and either use nonskid paint or Brightside one-part polyurethane with crushed walnut shells for grip. It worked well for me before. But the non-skid paint sounds attractive. It would preserve the teak deck look to a degree but far less area to maintain. I  would like to hang on to the teak on the fore-deck and after-deck for a few more years. Perhaps the Sikaflex would do that for me. I have ridges where the graphite epoxy stands proud. Better to sand them down level? Although they help a lot with non-skid, perhaps they increase the likelihood oh leveraging open cracks?

    I am off to Vancouver for two weeks tomorrow.

  • 15 Sep 2018 05:54
    Reply # 6670022 on 6668824

    Hi Jim,

    I see you are located in Canada. While living in California I used a product called Elastodeck 6001 AL (a liquid applied Polyurethane elastomer) on the plywood decks of the boat I built there and launched in 1988. I last heard of her about 4 years ago in Dunedin, New Zealand. The owner was boasting of the deck coating and how it never leaked or seemed to weather or wear out and was very easy on the feet as it is a resilient coating. I also used it when refurbishing the decks of a Kettenburg PCC in 2001 and this boat is still leak free. I believe Pacific Polymers has now been taken over by a Texas company, but the products are still available under the Elastodeck name and the website still exists. This would be an ideal material to coat a properly prepared and dry teak overlay deck as it is very strongly adhesive to the under layer and remains flexible after curing. The secret to a long life for this product is to make sure that the non skid sand is applied to "refusal", that is it is a complete cover for the wet under layer, and that it is properly over coated. If this is not done the product can wear quite quickly.

    All the best with the decks, David.

    Last modified: 15 Sep 2018 05:58 | Anonymous member
  • 15 Sep 2018 00:31
    Reply # 6669791 on 6668824

    This always seems to be the long term outcome of Teak decks. Very nice when still young, but eventually the timber wears down to the point where major refurbishment is needed. In the older days when the teak was glued and screwed down, the screws and plugs on top of them caused problems with the plugs wearing away, and then the screw heads eventually protruding from the surface.

    Sikaflex is a sealant often used for caulking teak decking so this might help fill the gaps, or a similar sealant. But eventually some major refurbishment is going to be needed. Some friends of mine who rebuilt a 47' fiberglass yacht with teak decks fiber-glassed over the teak and then painted the decks with non-skid paint. They had to do quite a lot of work stabilising the teak before applying the fiberglass.


  • 14 Sep 2018 11:22
    Message # 6668824

    Some feedback, please. I have a teak strip deck on Elsie N (soon to be "Hobbit") laid in graphite epoxy, held in place by screws and washers for spacing and hold down. Te original thickness was 1/8". It is now about 3/32" with epoxy ridges. (Good non-skid.) Here and there, the teak is pulling away from the epoxy. Since removing the winter cover, I have noticed them. After a rain, many of them close up.
    I wonder if my lovely deck has reached it's best before date and needs to be removed or glassed (or dyneled) over.

    Is there some compound I could squeeze into these narrow cracks to ge sone more life out of this deck?

    Annie, I remember you telling me you wet Badger's deck down once a day with sea water.

    Any suggestions? I did a search of our files without finding anything.

    Cheers, Jim


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