A 7 metre variant of SibLim

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  • 17 Nov 2018 05:48
    Reply # 6911442 on 6910641
     A quick trial fit shows that the puzzle joints will go together with a little pressure, but are by no means too slack. The tabs are a perfect fit in the slots, which is a relief - this is where Gary's model gave problems.


    For the sake of clarity the problem I had which David mentions had nothing to do with the accuracy David's design but rather a plywood supplier whose "1.5 mm" ply measured 2.11 mm thick. This meant the ply was too thick to go into the slots.

    I am very pleased that the puzzle joints fitted so well as there is an element of guestimation involved in the tolerances. 

    This really should be one of the easiest boats to assemble. 


  • 16 Nov 2018 16:29
    Reply # 6910641 on 6010674

    Imagine, if you will, that the old door in the photo is modelling a flat, smooth floor surface in my boatbuilding shed. At full size, it would be 3.23m x 8.415m - large enough to work on the puzzle joints. An actual building shed would need to be wider, to get the topsides on and coated. Maybe 4.5m x 9m would be just about large enough.

    It turned out that a craft knife wouldn't cut the tabs, but a multitool made short work of them. 180 grade abrasive paper cleans up the edges easily and quickly. A quick trial fit shows that the puzzle joints will go together with a little pressure, but are by no means too slack. The tabs are a perfect fit in the slots, which is a relief - this is where Gary's model gave problems.


    Last modified: 16 Nov 2018 20:29 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Nov 2018 16:11
    Reply # 6910598 on 6905577
    Peter wrote:

    David

    This looks really interesting.  You may remember that I built a model of the 9m version from CNC cut parts.  I've finally uploaded some pics to my album.

    I watch the progress with interest.  

    I'd forgotten about this. Did you take it any further than stitching the seams?
  • 15 Nov 2018 12:16
    Reply # 6905577 on 6010674

    David

    This looks really interesting.  You may remember that I built a model of the 9m version from CNC cut parts.  I've finally uploaded some pics to my album.

    I watch the progress with interest.  

  • 14 Nov 2018 21:40
    Reply # 6904983 on 6010674

    On this part, there are five tabs, cut halfway through, not in the puzzle joint but elsewhere. They are 8mm wide, and should cut easily with a craft knife. In some places, the cutter hasn't gone cleanly right through the ply, so these areas will have to be carefully cut too, to avoid tearing fibres out of the reverse side.

  • 14 Nov 2018 20:36
    Reply # 6904820 on 6010674
    Hi David,

    This looks very exciting. Even though I am spending my evenings struggling just to make patterns for a sail you now have me dreaming about building a 7m puzzle joint SibLim. Maybe sometime in the distant future. For now I will be looking forward to seeing updates on your model build.

    I was wondering if you could show some close up of the tabs that need to be cut out. Specifically I am interested in how much hand work is needed to get the part in the center right of your photo out of the panel and ready to assemble. Are there only three tabs to cut and sand or more like 30 on this one part?

    Scott.

    Last modified: 14 Nov 2018 20:36 | Anonymous member
  • 14 Nov 2018 14:15
    Reply # 6904160 on 6010674

    I am now in possession of a full set of CNC-cut parts for a model of the SibLim 7m. I propose to make up the model using the same methods as the full size version as nearly as I can. Thus, I will use epoxy fillets rather than PVA or polyurethane glue, for example. It will take longer, but the aim is to learn as much as possible about assembling the full size boat, so I think the extra time is justified.

    The first step will be to assemble the puzzle joints. These are to join pieces that are too big (at full size) to come out of a single sheet of plywood: the hull panels, main bulkheads and longitudinal members, mainly. 

    Nine 4ft x 2ft sheets of 2mm and three 4ft x 2ft sheets of 1.5mm plywood as received from Jordan Boats, with all parts CNC cut (tabs, which need to be hand cut and trimmed, retain the parts within the sheet).

    Last modified: 14 Nov 2018 18:50 | Anonymous member
  • 18 Oct 2018 20:59
    Reply # 6794133 on 6010674

    Yes, Chris, it could be scaled to 5.7m LOA x 2.2m max beam x 2.2m max height to fit within a standard 6m container.

    But it very much depends on your definition of "useful", and what kind of use you'd want to envisage.

  • 18 Oct 2018 20:26
    Reply # 6793710 on 6010674

    David.. do you believe that it is possible to build a useful boat of this type that would fit inside a 6 meter shipping container. 

  • 18 Oct 2018 14:13
    Reply # 6788449 on 6241608
    David wrote:

    In the UK, the leader in the field of production of plywood kit boats appears to be Jordan Boats, in Somerset. They will take any design, and produce a kit of the plywood parts. So, when we're a little bit further on in proving the design by CNC-cutting a model, this would probably be the place to go, for UK builders,  as they already have a lot of expertise.

    I've been discussing this project with Alec Jordan, and we've just struck a deal for him to cut the kit of parts for me, at 1:4.25 scale. It's going to be quite expensive for what it is, but hey, I get all the fun of building a Siblim of my very own, at a fraction of the cost and the work of the full size boat.
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