Batten parrels fastenings

  • 29 Mar 2017 19:54
    Reply # 4700860 on 4696185
    Jami Jokinen wrote:What about potential sharp edges of the hose clamps? Tape over?

    Dont worry. You worry far tooo much. Life is simple.
  • 29 Mar 2017 07:58
    Reply # 4697374 on 4694922

    I have 40mm plumbing waste pipe slid over my 38mm battens, as chafe protection (sure, it taps against the mast, but this tells me that the sail needs sheeting in). The forward end is secured by the screw that holds the sail to the batten, and the after end is far enough aft that it acts to stop the semi-short batten parrel from sliding forwards.

    I cannot think of a way of shielding a hose clamp sufficiently well to use it on a long distance cruising sail, though it might be OK on a sail used only for a few hours of sailing each week, if taped over.

    I've used a screwed-on plastic knob successfully for many thousands of miles, though. One small hole for a self-tapping screw is unlikely to cause damage, unless the batten is under-sized.

  • 29 Mar 2017 07:54
    Reply # 4697372 on 4696185
    Jami Jokinen wrote:What about potential sharp edges of the hose clamps? Tape over?
    That's why I didn't like the idea, but our Norwegian friends obviously have a pragmatic solution.
  • 28 Mar 2017 19:07
    Reply # 4696185 on 4694922
    What about potential sharp edges of the hose clamps? Tape over?
  • 28 Mar 2017 16:10
    Reply # 4695837 on 4694922
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    I agree with Ketil

    On the last rigs I have used hose-clamps to fix two loops from 6mm line to the batten. To these loops, I tie the batten parrels and HK parrels (if used). I always remember to wind insulating tape around the batten first, to avoid corrosion.

    Arne.

    PS: I have used a cheaper method which also worked (on Malena):  Wind 3-4 rounds of suitable tape around the battens where the batten parrels/HK parrels are to sit. The  1 - 2mm "belt" should be enough to secure a rolling hitch from sliding past it.

  • 28 Mar 2017 14:51
    Reply # 4695681 on 4694922

    Hose clamps. Do not make a hole in an aluminum tube!

  • 28 Mar 2017 10:20
    Reply # 4695162 on 4694922

    I have parrels made from nylon webbing and just use a constrictor knot to stop them sliding on my alloy tubes, although the batten fendering starts just forward of the constrictor knot, which assists in keeping the parrels from sliding forwards.

  • 28 Mar 2017 10:00
    Reply # 4695117 on 4694922

    I have found a good method on my sail with the idea actually coming from David Tyler. It is a pair of studs made in my case from a round of 12mm thick plastic (formed by a 12mm diameter hole saw), fastened to the batten with a stainless steel screw and the parrel is lashed around the batten behind the studs. Look in my member profile photo albums - New Sail Details, and you will find a photo. I have them on both the alloy and carbon tube batten and the method has proven reliable and trouble free, never slipped, never pulled out of the batten, and done no damage to the sail.



    Last modified: 28 Mar 2017 19:19 | Anonymous member
  • 28 Mar 2017 08:12
    Reply # 4694939 on 4694922
    Jami Jokinen wrote:What kind of methods have you used for fastening batten/HK parrels to the aluminium battens in order to keep them from sliding? Hose clamps?
    Those little stainless steel saddles are quite good; or you can just tap for a small machine screw with a decent head on it and tie the batten on with a suitable hitch: the bolt will stop it slipping forward.  I haven't found any knot that will stay in place on slippery, anodised alloy.  I think hose clamps would be hard on the battens and sail.
  • 28 Mar 2017 08:04
    Message # 4694922
    What kind of methods have you used for fastening batten/HK parrels to the aluminium battens in order to keep them from sliding? Hose clamps?
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