Rig for Fantail's type sail

  • 10 Feb 2017 11:57
    Reply # 4602339 on 4600065
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Antoine.

    If you take a good look at the original; a Hong Kong schooner, you will notice how extreme those rigs are. The AR is extremely low, the fanning goes from bottom to top and 95%+ of the mainsail sits aft of the mast. You will also see how the Hong Kong parrels are struggling, and bend the battens upwards, even if these appear to be made up of bundles of bamboo. The forces in that rig must be huge. My armchair guess is that they wanted to pile on as big sail as they could on a short (read: less expensive) mast. Also note how well all those panels are setting  -  the HK-parrels surely must do their job well -  and the crew were pros.

    The situation on the latest Fantail style (as with my Johanna-style) rigs is very different. Here most of the fanning is in the top 3-4 panels. If the sail can be peaked up with the use of a THP and YHP (plus moving the slingpoint a bit aft of the middle), the panels below will stay mostly in place without any need for HK parrels. I still fit them, but there is very little load on them after the THP and YHP have been set up.

    Arne

     

    Last modified: 10 Feb 2017 12:43 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 10 Feb 2017 10:32
    Reply # 4602284 on 4600065

    I don't use HK parrels, as I don't like the extra vertical load they put on the battens, and I don't find that they help with anything.

  • 10 Feb 2017 09:25
    Reply # 4602248 on 4600065

    Thanks.


    I can see there is no HK parrels, would they help at all or are they an overkill

    I am going to make a drawing for check everything.


    Regards


    Antoine

    WaterBear

  • 09 Feb 2017 18:40
    Reply # 4600834 on 4600827
    Bryan Tuffnell wrote:Fantail's sail sets best with the yard slung about 5% aft of centre. The real key to removing stress from the throat area has been to have the luff parrel act on the throat, as suggested and used by David. This encourages the sail to 'hang' from the yard rather than 'force' the sail into position as a pure luff hauling parrel does. When sailing to windward, Fantail's speed noticeably increases as the parrel is tensioned and the yard peaks.

    Throat hauling parrel rigged to two battens and through a block on the yard.

  • 09 Feb 2017 18:33
    Reply # 4600827 on 4600065
    Fantail's sail sets best with the yard slung about 5% aft of centre. The real key to removing stress from the throat area has been to have the luff parrel act on the throat, as suggested and used by David. This encourages the sail to 'hang' from the yard rather than 'force' the sail into position as a pure luff hauling parrel does. When sailing to windward, Fantail's speed noticeably increases as the parrel is tensioned and the yard peaks.
    Last modified: 09 Feb 2017 18:35 | Anonymous member
  • 09 Feb 2017 16:24
    Reply # 4600568 on 4600065

    The sheet consists of:

    • six sheeted points
    • three single spans, which can be either simple spans or anti-twist spans
    • five part sheet, with the bitter end at the lower span
    • a block at each of the middle and upper spans
    • three deck blocks
    • tail of the sheet comes down from the upper span, through a deck block and forward.
  • 09 Feb 2017 10:49
    Message # 4600065

    Hi everybody


    I am finally able to start the making of the new rig on WaterBear. It will be a Fantail mark2 sail. I am wondering what would be the best sheeting system, as long as running rigging too. I plan on having a halyard, a yard hauling parrel, a luf hauling parrel, a fanup preventer, 2 lazyjacks. I would love to have your thoughts to help me make my mind.


    Antoine

    WaterBear

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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