SibLim update

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  • 15 Jul 2018 06:54
    Reply # 6381756 on 4315719

    I am getting close to starting in the galley.  There are a lot of things to consider here, 

    Now we're getting to the heart of the matter. The very beating heart of this particular boat. In other boats, it might be the chart table, with banks of electronic screens glowing gently; or the helm, surrounded by winches, clutches and other hi-tech hardware. On SibLim, it's the galley.

  • 15 Jul 2018 02:59
    Reply # 6381651 on 4315719

    Not much to show for a couple of week's work, but I've updated my blog.  The other builders seem to be making much faster progress than I do, but I am enjoying myself, which is, when all is said and done, the main thing.

  • 03 Jul 2018 23:01
    Reply # 6359185 on 4315719

    I know what you mean, I would love to just once walk out of the building supplies store and think man, that wasn't too bad at all...


    Bill

  • 03 Jul 2018 08:45
    Reply # 6357877 on 6357686
    Gary wrote:

    I would have liked to have used tinned but the budget at the time was limited in its purchase possibilities. I do need to upgrade my LED bunk lights they are not bright enough for my liking.


    I may be getting inured to haemorrhaging money on this project (although I don't think I'll end up much over budget), but I didn't think the wire was anywhere near as terrifyingly expensive as I recalled.  However, that's how it seems to be: occasionally I have to be picked up and dusted off when I'm told the price of something, at other times I think, 'Gosh, that's quite cheap!'.  Most of the time I just grit my teeth and swipe the card :-\

    I have decided to buy standard lamps and replace the incandescent (or halogen) bulbs with LED.  Quite apart from the fact that so many LED lights are far from attractive, I gather that only a couple of percent are built to the standards one would choose.  And it's not easy to find out which those are.  By having replaceable bulbs, you reduce the risk of getting some duff LEDs and being left with having to replace the lamp, which invariably has its screw holes a few mm from its predecessor.  At least this what seems to happen to me. I do have a spectacularly good LED lamp that, in fact, I bought from Oz.  Sadly, I can't track them down any more, but the good news is that I bought two for 'Fantail' and only fitted one.  So I have an amazingly bright, 3 LED light for my galley, which is 'warm white', to boot.  Or it was when I last tested it. 


    Last modified: 03 Jul 2018 08:46 | Anonymous member
  • 03 Jul 2018 04:13
    Reply # 6357686 on 4315719

    I would have liked to have used tinned but the budget at the time was limited in its purchase possibilities. I do need to upgrade my LED bunk lights they are not bright enough for my liking.

  • 01 Jul 2018 22:11
    Reply # 6354155 on 6352534
    Gary Pick wrote:

    I was amazed at how much wire Redwing consumed. I used a lot of recycled extension lead and even cut the leads off old vacuum cleaners.

    My 'previously enjoyed' Fantail had both original and replaced wiring, much of which was redundant, much of which did nothing and some of which was broken or corroded between switch and outlet.

    This boat has brand new, tinned wiring.  I'm hoping that replacing it is going to be someone else's problem.  I can't see that I'll need that much (although I know how much it adds up) for lights, nav lights, DC outlets (sockets, I'd call them), echo sounder and auto pilot (if it still works).  I think that's the lot.




  • 01 Jul 2018 22:05
    Reply # 6354152 on 6352412
    David Tyler wrote:

    Annie, have you put a label onto each wire as it arrives into the switch panel area? The white heat shrink tube, that you write on with ballpoint pen before heating, is good. Saves confusion later on, when the number of wires has multiplied.

    Of course.  I do have COD, remember! I used masking tape labels, in fact, which last 'forever', and just to be sure I (a) wrote with felt tip on the wire and (b) wrote on the inside of the switch panel so that I don't do the mirror image stuff I so often end up doing.  And the bus bar contacts match up with the switch panel.  Of course.  COD has its advantages, I guess.
  • 01 Jul 2018 11:26
    Reply # 6352534 on 4315719

    I was amazed at how much wire Redwing consumed. I used a lot of recycled extension lead and even cut the leads off old vacuum cleaners.

  • 01 Jul 2018 06:35
    Reply # 6352412 on 4315719

    Annie, have you put a label onto each wire as it arrives into the switch panel area? The white heat shrink tube, that you write on with ballpoint pen before heating, is good. Saves confusion later on, when the number of wires has multiplied.

  • 01 Jul 2018 03:13
    Reply # 6352309 on 4315719

    It's been cold enough that I had to go and buy some more fast hardener, but the colder weather makes spreading polyurethane paint around that much easier.  I dare say it only achieves a percentage of its potential hardness, but it's still a lot harder than enamel, so that's fine.  Another blog, for those who are interested. (I just tried to attach a couple of picture files, but both were rotated 90 degrees.  Most peculiar.  So you'll have to go to the blog to see them.)

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