SibLim update

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  • 20 Sep 2018 09:16
    Reply # 6677901 on 4315719

    Oh boy, Eerik - your Paradox looks lovely!

    I never seem to have much success with making patterns this way, with curved areas.  I've tried in the past and always seem to end up with just as much fiddling as with any other method.  This undoubtedly reflects more on me than the method.  Your patterns look far more elegant than the ones that I have made.

    I'm running scared of hot glue at the moment: the last time I used it, it tore off not only the paint, but the plywood underneath.  I've tried using it against packing tape, but that only works some of the time.  It will be nice to lay the decks, which is a much more straightforward project!

  • 18 Sep 2018 15:30
    Reply # 6674736 on 4315719

    I would like to show an alternative way of making MDF template for custom shapes.

    Here the lines are straight.but it works with curved lines too. Just thin MDF strips are cut and glued with super glue. One strip is overlaping the other, the super glue is squeesed to joint, it goes between the 2 and bonds almost immidiately. If needed to be held in place, hot melt glue can be used. Tape the part that you want to keep clean and bond the mdf strip to it.


  • 18 Sep 2018 08:33
    Reply # 6674233 on 6672365
    Anonymous wrote:

    Another thing I should have mentioned.  The anchorages here are often quite silty and I like to use salt water for cooking - seawater has the perfect ratio of salt for bread making. One of the advantages we found on Badger was having perfectly clean sea water in less than clean anchorages.  I'm sure the two Davids are right, but I suspect I'm a victim of early brain washing.

    In the past there has been concern with failure of thru-hulls and gate valves. On charter yachts we used a NZ Ministry of Transport approved gate valve which was constructed from bronze. Unfortunately the valve stem was of brass so eventually the valve plunger would no longer go up and down because the brass threads of the valve stem turned to mush in the salt environment. I was once trying to pull an engine saltwater intake hose off a bronze seacock on a not very old French production yacht, fortunately while the boat was on the hardstand, because with all my levering to get the hose free of the nipple on the seacock the whole caboodle snapped off at the thru-hull. That would have been a very messy situation if it had happened while the boat was in the water! But I think that modern plastic thu-hulls and ball valves should be very reliable.

    So maybe a couple of liters of sparkling clean Pacific Ocean bottled salt water for bread-making, and a gushing plentiful supply of slightly silty saltwater for every thing else?

    When we first got 'Footprints' the galley sink drained into a 20 liter container under the galley cabinet, in the interest of no thru-hulls. It only took a couple of times of forgetting to empty the container with the result of a bilge full of dishwater that I desided that the system was ridiculous and I put in a proper thru-hull drain, (with a Hansen valve), as soon as possible. 


    Last modified: 18 Sep 2018 08:49 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Sep 2018 08:59
    Reply # 6672365 on 4315719

    Another thing I should have mentioned.  The anchorages here are often quite silty and I like to use salt water for cooking - seawater has the perfect ratio of salt for bread making. One of the advantages we found on Badger was having perfectly clean sea water in less than clean anchorages.  I'm sure the two Davids are right, but I suspect I'm a victim of early brain washing.

  • 17 Sep 2018 06:22
    Reply # 6672164 on 4315719

    Well, just to add my take on salt water at the galley. I have always fitted a salt water pump to each of my boats. I use the Whale double action foot pump which gives good pressure for rinsing dishes etc, and I am very happy using a nylon thru-hull fitting with a modern plastic ball valve, reinforced nylon hose, and double hose clips. I feel this is a very secure method of getting salt water to the galley and the chances of failure and eventual foundering of the vessel are I think minimal, (yes, I know similar things were said about the Titanic!). I would only use a good quality valve which in New Zealand means the black body, blue handle Hansen ball valves which are pressure rated to 15 Bar. And I have a soft wood conical plug attached to the ball valve in case something should ever go wrong. For added security the hose could probably be led above the waterline with an anti-siphon valve fitted. I have never had any problems with blockage from marine growth, but sometimes when I am swimming around the boat I will poke a small screw driver up the thru-hull to clear any possible obstructions. I am not a big fan of multiple thru-hulls so on 'Footprints' the only thru hulls which are under water are the salt water intake, and galley sink drain. The thru-hull for the vanity basin in the head is above the waterline. Of course when leaving the boat unattended for any length of time we close the thru-hull valves which seems a sensible precaution.

    Last modified: 17 Sep 2018 07:44 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Sep 2018 00:39
    Reply # 6671890 on 4315719

    It depends on the proportion of time spent afloat/dried out, but a bucketful taken as the tide leaves me does the job for me.

    A bucket over the side at any time at all does me.

    I have to agree with Annie on this one.

    As a “shallow water sailor” from way back I can attest to the joy of the long reaches of sheltered tidal waters, almost universally ignored on our northeast coast. Taking the mud in a sheltered spot is good fun – this will be one of the many virtues of Annie’s boat.

    Just remember to fill ALL your buckets with salt water before wading ashore while still afloat!


    Last modified: 17 Sep 2018 00:44 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Sep 2018 22:53
    Reply # 6671799 on 6671790
    Anonymous wrote:

    I plan to dry the boat out, or be anchored in very shallow water, where the keels will probably touch the bottom at low water, very frequently.  In that case the intake may not work, or may be bringing in muddy, disturbed water.  The 10 litre container ensures that I have clean water.  

    Yes, that's a valid justification for the container, but the only one that I can see. It depends on the proportion of time spent afloat/dried out, but a bucketful taken as the tide leaves me does the job for me.
  • 16 Sep 2018 22:48
    Reply # 6671795 on 4315719

    It's simpler than that, Arne. You just take the seatube right up close to the deck (so it's easiest to put it next to a bulkhead), and then the hose goes up so high before it comes back down to the pump that flooding is a practical impossibility unless the boat is about to disappear beneath the waves. 

    When you have a seacock and a hose attached to it below the waterline, good seamanship demands that you have a conical bung ready to knock if all else fails. The same applies here: if you're paranoid about possible leakage, you can attach a conical bung on a cord right next to the top of the seatube. 

    Copper has good antifouling properties, and I've never had any blockages due to fouling. I  forget when I first started using seatubes made of copper wrapped in GRP, but it's more than two decades. To be clear, the whole of the copper tube is encased in GRP, so that there is no leakage path if the copper should corrode away.

  • 16 Sep 2018 22:33
    Reply # 6671790 on 4315719

    Arne, I was just about to come back and edit this, because I remembered the clinching reason why I had decided against the idea.  (I love the Norwegian saying, by the way!)  II plan to dry the boat out, or be anchored in very shallow water, where the keels will probably touch the bottom at low water, very frequently.  In that case the intake may not work, or may be bringing in muddy, disturbed water.  The 10 litre container ensures that I have clean water.  Yes, I agree it is not obviously rational, and I can truly see both sides of the argument.  I'd also add that I can see I'm being a bit paranoid, too.

    I've thought about the long pipe, but it's more complexity than I want and the small galley pump would be struggling to pull water through such a long pipe.

    The pump emptying the sink will be a lot higher up, so I think that will be less of an issue.  It would be easy to fit a seacock by the outlet, too, if I feel it necessary.  The one on Badger never siphoned back, however.  The pump mechanism does, in itself, provide a bit of a barrier against water ingress, being much heavier than that for a galley pump.

  • 16 Sep 2018 22:09
    Reply # 6671723 on 4315719
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Annie,

    I am inclined to agree with David on this. In Norway we have a proverb  saying  -  “No reason for crossing the stream to fetch water”. That saltwater can sounds a bit like that.

    On the other hand, I can understand your reluctance against drilling a hole in the boat. Here is an armchair idea:
    What about leading the inlet water pipe aft to the transom? You could fit an anti-syphon bend (valve) high up, hidden on the inside of the transom, and then lead the pipe through to the outside, and down to below the waterline. That anti-syphon valve would prevent any sinking of the boat, even if the long pipe should start leaking. In addition, the saltwater inlet would be accessible for cleaning.

    Another thing, I guess you are planning to pump out any water from the sink as well? Maybe an anti-syphon valve makes sense there too?

    Just a thought,

    Arne


    Last modified: 16 Sep 2018 22:12 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
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