SibLim update

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  • 29 Jan 2018 19:11
    Reply # 5707695 on 4315719

    Yes, indeed, Arne.  Our local manufacturer, Altex, makes polyurethane paints that can be mixed to any colour.  You need to go to a trade shop to get this done because we are talking of commercial products here.  We have a great place in Whangarei, who also gives you a 'trade' account, ie 15% off, if you go there often enough.  My friendly, neighbourhood chandler used to work for paint manufacturers and he, too, will mix to any colour.  Being commercial products, they don't have the 'brushability' of something such as International Perfection, but with perseverance one can achieve at least acceptable results.

  • 29 Jan 2018 09:49
    Reply # 5706652 on 5706541
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Annie Hill wrote
    You're too kind.  It's about the colour of primroses, but its official name is the romantic FFFF80.  The local colour card calls it "Salomie" - heaven knows why!

    Really?

    Does that mean that you can have any colour mixed for 2-pot polyurethane paint in your local paint shop? Up here in Ultima Thule, we can only have single-pot paints mixed like that. Or maybe I have just forgotten to ask around...

    Arne



    Last modified: 29 Jan 2018 09:49 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 29 Jan 2018 06:20
    Reply # 5706541 on 5706187
    Graham Cox wrote:

    Is that shade of yellow called primrose?  Whatever it's called, it looks lovely and very smart too, as does your newly varnished fore-cabin.

    You're too kind.  It's about the colour of primroses, but its official name is the romantic FFFF80.  The local colour card calls it "Salomie" - heaven knows why!
    Last modified: 29 Jan 2018 06:24 | Annie
  • 28 Jan 2018 23:23
    Reply # 5706187 on 4315719

    Just caught up with your blog, Annie.  Is that shade of yellow called primrose?  Whatever it's called, it looks lovely and very smart too, as does your newly varnished fore-cabin.  Such exquisite detail.  Fantan is going to be a jewel when you finish her!

  • 28 Jan 2018 17:56
    Reply # 5705781 on 4315719

    Tremendous, Annie. What beautiful progress, in this post and the last. It all looks absolutely gorgeous – hooray for portholes cut!

    Shemaya

  • 28 Jan 2018 01:13
    Reply # 5705260 on 4315719

    I've been doing another job that it's important to get right: fitting deckbeams.

    You can read about in on my blog.

  • 14 Jan 2018 01:36
    Reply # 5681770 on 4315719

    So sorry not to have blogged for a while, but I dare say those that are following my story will have been busy with all the things that happen around Christmas.  anyway, I've just posted a nice long one on my blog (which also includes a couple of nice photos of the Tall Ships junket).

  • 24 Dec 2017 00:44
    Reply # 5647290 on 4315719
  • 21 Dec 2017 03:55
    Reply # 5644802 on 5642788
    Annie Hill wrote: The exception will probably be the galley counter: I used to revarnish that once a year on Badger, 'whether it needed it or not'.  The drawback is that it's a lot harder to get the sort of finish one would hope for - and it has to be said that I am not the world's best with a paintbrush. :-/  However, I keep repeating 'Country Cottage Look' (which is probably a slander on country cottages) and it looks fine when I look at it without my glasses!
    Thanks, I figured you'd have a good reason for going to the trouble of two-part varnish.   My boatbuilding today was conducted in snow (Vancouver, BC), so while you are sweating it out, at least you have the small consolation that your varnish, or you,  is not freezing.  For the galley counter, have you considered the self-leveling finish they use in restaurants, it forms a thick durable layer and can even be had in a variety that has an anti-slip grippy-ness to it.
  • 20 Dec 2017 20:08
    Reply # 5644385 on 5643399
    Graeme Kenyon wrote:

    Actually, just for the record, Fantail had Chinese overtones too.

    In Mandarin, "fan" means "sail" and I always thought "Fantail" was a doubly good fit.

    (as in "fanchuan" which means "sailboat")

    Like everyone now, I am awaiting the final result. 

    I am sure, like the lovely boat itself, it the name will be the result of much thought and will be just right.


    I remember you telling me that, Graeme.  And of course she had a slightly fanned sail, too, which this design doesn't.
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