SibLim update

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  • 23 Oct 2017 10:46
    Reply # 5332068 on 4315719

    And as for seaboots ...

    They live at the foot of the companionway steps, ready to put on when your presence is needed on deck in the wee small hours, if it's raining/the spray is flying/there's a heavy dew.

    Don't they?

  • 22 Oct 2017 20:42
    Reply # 5328882 on 5328739
    David Tyler wrote:

    Good work, and a good blog entry - save for the gross injustice that you do to those of us who also keep our shoes in the awkwardly shaped triangular space at the bottom of the clothes locker!

    When we had Missee Lee we got hold of the layout plans for the Westerly 21, her plastic younger sister, and I thought it was rather civilised that it incorporated a shoe locker.  Since then I've always been very aware of the fact that on most boats, even large ones, no place has been planned for shoes.   The best you can hope for is to tumble them into a locker together and then rummage through to find a pair.  Even when you only take a size 36, they do require somewhere to live.  And as for seaboots ...
  • 22 Oct 2017 19:49
    Reply # 5328739 on 4315719

    Good work, and a good blog entry - save for the gross injustice that you do to those of us who also keep our shoes in the awkwardly shaped triangular space at the bottom of the clothes locker!

  • 22 Oct 2017 02:09
    Reply # 5325222 on 4315719

    I'm back in the forecabin, mercifully only having to lug around pieces of plywood that I can easily handle.  I'm now painting once again, in preparation for gluing in the various pieces that make up the starboard locker.

    More in the usual place.

    Last modified: 22 Oct 2017 02:10 | Annie
  • 09 Oct 2017 07:30
    Reply # 5302966 on 4315719
    I'd be terrified up such a tall ladder and Marcus is busy working on Sweet Thursday.  I think he'd rather just be asked to come and lift things when necessary :-) 

    Engine?  Mercifully, I will have a 6 hp outboard and that shouldn't be too hard to get up to the stern.


  • 09 Oct 2017 01:01
    Reply # 5302781 on 4315719

    Annie, Arne,

    I don't think it's to late to install one or few loops on shed's beams and have just to hook a shackle on the right place to make the job. It would be usefull for yours deck's pannels and other items you want haul like engine, beer barrel etc.....
    The counterweight may be good but you have to lift it before!

    Bruno

  • 08 Oct 2017 23:10
    Reply # 5302722 on 4315719
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Annie and Bruno.

    I made use of a similar setup this summer. I was to service some window panels in my house. A couple of them were so big, bulky and heavy that I just didn’t dare to lift them off their hinges. Being alone, I solved it with temporary handles, a single block  -  and a counterweight in the shape of a 5 litre plastic can. This, taking about a third or half the weight of the window, let me use both hands to control the window (it had to be opened 100° before lifting it clear).

    A similar setup would be a great helper in single-handed boat-building when heavy items is to be lifted and accurately positioned without help, even up to the weight of an inboard engine. The counterweight gives us super-strength!

    Arne

     


  • 08 Oct 2017 20:26
    Reply # 5302554 on 5301930
    Bruno Gouget wrote:

    Hi Annie,
    To lift alone a sheet of plywood, you can fit on it one or two handles with two screws and  pieces of rope and haul it up with a purchase (a little halyard) from the top of the sheld . And when Marcus is around you can enjoy  a good bock of home brew whith him, contemplating the finished job!
    Kisses
    bruno


    Cher Bruno

    On more than a few occasions I have wished that I had put a couple of blocks and tackles from the roof beams.  A  tir-fort on a rail, running along the shed, would have been perfect.  A bit late now! 


  • 08 Oct 2017 04:20
    Reply # 5301930 on 4315719

    Hi Annie,
    To lift alone a sheet of plywood, you can fit on it one or two handles with two screws and  pieces of rope and haul it up with a purchase (a little halyard) from the top of the sheld . And when Marcus is around you can enjoy  a good bock of home brew whith him, contemplating the finished job!
    Kisses
    bruno

  • 08 Oct 2017 03:04
    Reply # 5301876 on 4315719

    The latest news is in the usual place.


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