SibLim update

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  • 19 Mar 2017 21:17
    Reply # 4676768 on 4676064
    David Tyler wrote:

    Ah, this explains why I haven't been getting my Sunday morning fix of photos of beautiful, glowing woodwork. Will you be moving over to the lockers on the other side of the forecabin now? 

    Yup.  Once I've got the bunk flat fitted, with the hatches cut out.  Pete has offered to come and build the tabernacle for me, bless him.  This will make it a lot easier to fit out the rest of the cabin, to check that doors can open, etc.

    I've been busy sawing up kahikatea for framing, but it's amazing how quickly I get through it.  Four 5m, 200, x 50 looked like heaps of timber.  Not now!  Anyone got any more to offer, please?  Or cedar, douglas, anything that I can use for framing?  All reasonable offers considered!!


    Last modified: 19 Mar 2017 21:18 | Annie
  • 19 Mar 2017 08:32
    Reply # 4676064 on 4315719

    Ah, this explains why I haven't been getting my Sunday morning fix of photos of beautiful, glowing woodwork. Will you be moving over to the lockers on the other side of the forecabin now? 

  • 19 Mar 2017 00:53
    Reply # 4675704 on 4315719
    I wickedly took a holiday, to go on a tiki tour with an old friend.  I was assured that I would come back a 'new woman'.  We had a great time in spite of some of our objectives - such as the Coromandel Peninsula - being unavailable due to weather.

    Now back to the grindstone.  Sadly, the new me seems as slow and distractable as the old, but I plod on.


  • 27 Feb 2017 15:25
    Reply # 4637313 on 4636278
    Annie Hill wrote:Graham, you are really too kind.  One of the reasons I wanted to build in wood is that it has the overwhelming advantage of always looking beautiful at every stage of the build, so that it keeps on inspiring me.  Most other materials are unattractive until the boat is coming towards completion (although I do realise that beauty is in the eye of the beholder).
    I had to laugh (to keep from crying) when I read this Annie.  My days are currently full of prickly aluminum slivers and chips.  Despite washing, my long underwear seems to be slowly accumulating them.  Thus, sitting has now become an exercise in acupuncture.  Although aluminum is more pleasant to work with than steel, I'm desperate to get to the interior fit-out so I can switch to wood.  Thanks for the inspiring pics from Siblim.
    Last modified: 27 Feb 2017 15:28 | Anonymous member
  • 27 Feb 2017 12:40
    Reply # 4637131 on 4636278
    Annie Hill wrote:

    I'm not so much patient as paranoid: I've seen too many wood/epoxy boats suffering rot because the builder was too rushed to apply those extra coats of epoxy. 

    I agree 100%. Wood epoxy construction is a wonderful development. But the devil is in the details. I discovered the hard way, how important it is to spend extra time on the corners, inside and outside corners. They must never be sharp. Sooner or later, they will crack. Generous filleting or rounding is essential, before coating.


  • 26 Feb 2017 20:26
    Reply # 4636278 on 4635026
    Graham Cox wrote:

    I've been looking at the latest photos of SibLim's interior fitout, Annie.  It's a work of art!  It may take you a long time to finish her, but you'll have the rest of your life to enjoy her beauty.  I wish I had your patience.  I'd love to build something like her, or maybe a 25 ft version of that cute Chapelle boat, and spend the rest of life mooching around the Bay of Islands.  The Chapelle design would be close to my ideal "retirement" boat, with the cabin carried further aft to create an internal control station, and the aft mast moved forward a bit to create a proper junk schooner, but I fear I don't have enough time or energy left for such a project, and if I did build another boat it would be rather rough and ready.  You are a star!!

    Graham, you are really too kind.  One of the reasons I wanted to build in wood is that it has the overwhelming advantage of always looking beautiful at every stage of the build, so that it keeps on inspiring me.  Most other materials are unattractive until the boat is coming towards completion (although I do realise that beauty is in the eye of the beholder).

    I'm not so much patient as paranoid: I've seen too many wood/epoxy boats suffering rot because the builder was too rushed to apply those extra coats of epoxy.  Indeed, professional builders would find it very difficult to charge out the hours to their customers, so I completely understand why this is one job that is skimped.  Unfortunately, it is probably the most important part of ensuring the boat's longevity.

    I can understand both your wish to build the ideal 'retirement' boat and your reluctance to take on the task.  But SibLim could be built a lot more quickly than this, so don't give up yet!  I am going to fit a pram hood so that I can handle the boat from inside in the rain and inclement weather - just in case.


  • 26 Feb 2017 01:45
    Reply # 4635026 on 4315719

    I've been looking at the latest photos of SibLim's interior fitout, Annie.  It's a work of art!  It may take you a long time to finish her, but you'll have the rest of your life to enjoy her beauty.  I wish I had your patience.  I'd love to build something like her, or maybe a 25 ft version of that cute Chapelle boat, and spend the rest of life mooching around the Bay of Islands.  The Chapelle design would be close to my ideal "retirement" boat, with the cabin carried further aft to create an internal control station, and the aft mast moved forward a bit to create a proper junk schooner, but I fear I don't have enough time or energy left for such a project, and if I did build another boat it would be rather rough and ready.  You are a star!!

  • 26 Feb 2017 01:04
    Reply # 4635016 on 4315719

    I've posted a few more photos.  I'm finally doing something in the interior of the boat, which is something of a boost to morale!  I've decided there's not much point in showing a progress report, because you can barely see any of the interior from either forward or aft.  So I'll just show the latest photo:

  • 23 Feb 2017 19:44
    Reply # 4629234 on 4627989
    Antoine ALLAIN wrote:

    Thanks Arne, I still have to learn how to post pics here.

    Annie, I was wandering the same thing. I don't know if it just a quick drawing by Chapelle to illustrate his writting or something that was really for build. If someone is registered to Woodenboat forum, they might ask there ?


    Antoine

    WaterBear


    Gary Pick is a member.  I dare say he'll chase it up some time.

    Chris has put an excellent description of how to post from your album, in the Help section towards the bottom of the blue column on the left of the screen.


    Last modified: 23 Feb 2017 19:45 | Annie
  • 23 Feb 2017 13:19
    Reply # 4628332 on 4315719

    Thanks for posting this, Arne. I have a copy of that book, stored in a safe place somewhere. I've been looking for it to find just that picture.

    A handsome little boat. One of the first western designed junks I ever laid eyes on.

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