SibLim update

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  • 20 Aug 2017 15:22
    Reply # 5038757 on 4315719
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Annie, in the blog you wrote that you aim for a satin finish when painting. How do you do that? Paul J.T. mentioned once that one can add (baby?) talcum to the paint to flatten it. Is that what you do?

    Arne

  • 20 Aug 2017 08:29
    Reply # 5038324 on 4315719

    Sunday morning - the time I take 'off' to do all the other things I can't fit in with building a boat and the usual household chores, is the time that I usually post on my blog.  But I was inveigled away the Sunday before last for a birthday celebration at Rob and Maren's Prince's.  And then last weekend saw the Winter junket.  I wasn't going, but was lured by the thoughts of a wood burning stove on Shoestring.  I'm a great fan of being warm, but the only place that's warm in my shed is in bed with a hot water bottle!  So I succumbed to temptation and had a nice wee sail in Shoestring and another one in Freebie, before coming back to reality.

    However, I have now caught up with my blog and you can gasp with wonder and awe at more photos of painting bits of plywood:

    Last modified: 20 Aug 2017 08:37 | Annie
  • 30 Jul 2017 08:11
    Reply # 5002467 on 4315719

    Mark - by the time I've finished this boat I'll be lucky to be voyaging on any income!  (Just kidding - the funds are holding up remarkably well, really.)

    I've posted again on my blog - still painting!

  • 23 Jul 2017 09:10
    Reply # 4990260 on 4315719

    Annie,

    Great blog,  basis of the next book?  (Voyaging on a slightly more comfortable income?) 

    Love that the beer factory is already installed (anchor locker, then heads, then beer - sounds the right order!)

    If your glasses steam up, shows the face mask may not be well  fitting (and working).  I suffer from tree pollen asthma, so wear a mask cycling to work in spring, I found it worth getting the best - Moldex 3105, FFP2 standard.

  • 23 Jul 2017 03:37
    Reply # 4990143 on 4315719

    It's good to hear of your progress, Malcolm and thank you for your kind comments about my blog.  I much prefer posting there than trying to turn my albums into a story and several people have commented that they prefer reading it that way. 

    I still can't get my head around a junk-rigged steam yacht.  What a head turner!  Your tabernacle sounds like it should be solid enough!  I don't know if I mentioned, but one of the ideas I wanted a tabernacle was to make it much less easy for any leaks to find a way in.  Rain will slowly penetrate, but is quite easy to guard against: waves hitting with force are much better at finding their way in, but I don't imagine you are planning any ocean crossings!  We had originally planned to put SibLim's mast in a trunk, which would have lowered the sail plan, but in the end I felt it was more work than it justified, particularly as it was actually weakening the deck, just where I wanted it to be at its strongest.  (As ever, my logic may well be flawed here.)

    As for my getting in the water before you - don't bet on it!  But as long as we are both happy with what we are achieving, it doesn't really matter.

    You must be thrilled to have the deck beams on - she's really starting to look like a little ship now, and the skylight/engine cover looks fantastic.  You will have a beautiful wee craft at the end of all your work.

    I've carried on working in the heads area - lots and lots of painting been going on, so not a whole heap of photos.  The shelves have all been painted and installed on the port side and I'm now working on the bulkhead doors.

    For those who are interested. you can find what I've been doing in more detail on my blog


    Last modified: 23 Jul 2017 03:41 | Annie
  • 13 Jul 2017 20:27
    Reply # 4975117 on 4315719

    Annie, thank you for the efforts on the blog - they make great/interesting reading (no surprise really given your previous record as an author of fascinating books!)

    The tabernacle discussion is interesting too. We went for a forward opening tabernacle, but given the layout of things the mast actually steps about a metre below cabin height, with the pivot about 300mm above the roof line (swinging thru a slot in the cabin roof). 

    The original design from the designer called for building a wooden case dividing the cabin in two with the mast stepped onto the keel and pivoted at cabin roof height (wherry-style) - but this "mast version of a centreboard case" so wrecked the usability of the cabin we started again, and constructed the tabernacle and step in steel (yes, very infra-dig I know). So, the structure is now a piece of box section secured to the "keel", with the open sided box for the lower part of the tabernacle welded to the top, and four steel box-section braces securing this between the deck clamps, port and starboard and a substantial laminated beam forward. This is then bolted (thru the cabin roof line) to the upper part of the box (with the (yet to be finalised) pivot.) The obvious problem with this design is the opportunity for leakage! I think the best current plan is to make a large fabric "boot" that is seized to the mast above the pivot and secured around the edges of the opening in the cabin roof. A bit like a gearstick boot in a car. Time will tell if this works.

    We are using an alloy-lamp-post mast and planning for only 16-18sqM of sail so hopefully this will be strong enough!

    As a picture is quicker than all these words, these two pages in Befur's Blog might help add some clarity... one  two and following pages.

    Annie, I still think you are going to beat us into the water with a "fully finished" boat, our current plans are to install the steam plant and try to "see if it floats" before the winter, and then aim to fit the sailing rig in the following season :-/

    Last modified: 13 Jul 2017 20:42 | Anonymous member
  • 13 Jul 2017 06:07
    Reply # 4972005 on 4315719

    No, please don't add an extra shelf on the port side. As I said, what you have is fine.

  • 12 Jul 2017 22:13
    Reply # 4971500 on 4969399
    David Tyler wrote:You're both right, of course. The load when sailing is taken by the bottom of what I think of as the fender locker, but I understand is now the woodshed (Tys tie's fender lockers totally fill with water when hard on the wind in fresh conditions, and I was under the impression that wet wood doesn't burn as well as dry wood...) I was thinking of the times when I was short tacking with both boards down, and when the windward board was inadvertantly dropped. There was definitely some discernible movement, though of course Tystie has pivoted boards, which transmit forces through the pin, and Siblim doesn't.

    Your port side shelves will be fine.  Put something similar on the other side, and all will be well.

    The wood lockers are intended for wood that has just been brought aboard.  Quite apart from the fact that there is heaps of room under the foredeck for fenders (which will probably only be used at junkets, when someone wants to come alongside), I know from harsh experience that not very much wood takes up a lot of space until sawn into stove-sized lengths.  I shall have a box below for the sawn-up wood which can dry out nicely there (not that I have any intention of sailing hard on the wind in fresh conditions if I can avoid it!)  But putting newly-gathered wood in the deck lockers, will avoid bringing insects on board, and if any wood happens to have rot spores, they won't be finding their way below.


    I shouldn't have thought that even with both boards down, the windward one would put any serious loading on the inside of the box, but I shall certainly assume that you are correct.  I have an enormous capacity to worry and am now thoroughly discomforted with respect to the bilgeboards, so I am fitting an extra 12mm, shelf, at the same height as the stringer the deck lockers are attached to.  (From what I can gather from drawings showing the bilgeboard down, this is where the top will be.)  Well filletted to the bulkheads and board casing, I trust this will do the job, although the shelf below it will be somewhat less useful.  On the starboard side, as I said, I am fitting a fore-and aft counter, which is about 800 mm long and, fortuitously, at exactly the correct height.  With the bulkhead cut, coated and framed up, it would have been more than vexatious to have to start again on that side.  I can't put a similar set of shelves that side, because the passageway is already well to starboard of the centre line.  The amount of strutting and bulkheading in the heads compartment will put HMS Erebus to shame, when completed!

  • 12 Jul 2017 03:49
    Reply # 4969399 on 4969273
    Annie Hill wrote:
    ueli lüthi wrote: as the leeward board will take the big part of the forces. it's the outward side of the case that needs to be strong on bilgeboard top level – and there the hull should provide sufficient strength…

    utnik


    Well, I have to admit that this was my thinking, but I'm the first to admit to being totally ignorant about engineering stresses and very challenged when it comes to thinking about them.
    You're both right, of course. The load when sailing is taken by the bottom of what I think of as the fender locker, but I understand is now the woodshed (Tys tie's fender lockers totally fill with water when hard on the wind in fresh conditions, and I was under the impression that wet wood doesn't burn as well as dry wood...) I was thinking of the times when I was short tacking with both boards down, and when the windward board was inadvertantly dropped. There was definitely some discernible movement, though of course Tystie has pivoted boards, which transmit forces through the pin, and Siblim doesn't.

    Your port side shelves will be fine.  Put something similar on the other side, and all will be well.

    Last modified: 12 Jul 2017 07:36 | David
  • 12 Jul 2017 01:16
    Reply # 4969273 on 4969252
    ueli lüthi wrote: as the leeward board will take the big part of the forces. it's the outward side of the case that needs to be strong on bilgeboard top level – and there the hull should provide sufficient strength…

    utnik


    Well, I have to admit that this was my thinking, but I'm the first to admit to being totally ignorant about engineering stresses and very challenged when it comes to thinking about them.
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