North Atlantic 29 Plans out there? (E.g. Teleport)

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  • 05 Mar 2017 14:26
    Reply # 4648860 on 3632542

    I have, by the way, sent copies of the digitized plans to Bill Dixon whose company sold them to me in the first place, for their archives. Sent also a copy of Teleport next to a glacier in Greenland. They were well received. He remembers, as a young man, mailing the originals to me in 1976. He agreed with me that Angus Primrose would have been pleased to see the design being put to the use for which it was intended.

  • 05 Mar 2017 10:55
    Reply # 4648760 on 4648290
    David Tyler wrote:
    Jim Creighton wrote: Could you expand on that?
    Well, I could, but I don't think this is the right topic to do that, as we're moving further and further away from talking about the original NA-29.

    Quite right.

    Meanwhile, Chris has done us a service by illustrating how a NA-9 hull could be built by a less labour intensive method, bringing it in closer range of the possible.


  • 04 Mar 2017 22:39
    Reply # 4648290 on 4648241
    Jim Creighton wrote:
    David Tyler wrote:

     A four or six panel hull would require a centreline structure, and a long keel would further complicate the issue.

    Could you expand on that?
    Well, I could, but I don't think this is the right topic to do that, as we're moving further and further away from talking about the original NA-29.
  • 04 Mar 2017 22:15
    Reply # 4648241 on 4648166
    David Tyler wrote:

     A four or six panel hull would require a centreline structure, and a long keel would further complicate the issue.

    Could you expand on that?
  • 04 Mar 2017 21:31
    Reply # 4648166 on 3632542

    That's it. Moreover, they have a design, the Vagabond 26, that is remarkably similar in dimensions to SibLim, with the same five panel hull, the same shoal draught and the same stub keel + board (not as pretty, though, IMHO). This is built by stitch and glue, and can be built in a basket mould as they call it, just as SibLim could have been. It's only a short step from here to a boat the size of a multichine NA-29, but it has to be said that a five or seven panel hull would be much easier. A four or six panel hull would require a centreline structure, and a long keel would further complicate the issue.

  • 04 Mar 2017 20:29
    Reply # 4648010 on 3632542

    David, I found a website that appears to illustrate what you describe.

    They call it the  "basket mold, hull assembly method".

      http://bateau2.com/howto/basket_mold.php

  • 04 Mar 2017 20:00
    Reply # 4647940 on 4647551
    David Tyler wrote:

    Actually, Jim, the way to get a fast build of the hull is a method that's been suggested for SibLim. Make a series of female moulds, and set them up the right way up, and then make up full length panels, lift them carefully into position with four people, then stitch, fillet and glass tape. This puts the builder under no time pressure. Then fit out the majority of the furniture. Then remove the female moulds, and lay the boat down, first on one side and then on the other, to add glass tape and glass sheathing, and to paint the bottom of the hull. Then stand her upright again to add the deck and finish off.

    Darn. That was my next question, answered already, "Have you considered stitch and glue (a.k.a. stitch and tape) ?" I've made a couple of small S&G boats, on a male mold but I can see the advantages of the female mold method.
  • 04 Mar 2017 14:52
    Reply # 4647551 on 3632542

    Actually, Jim, the way to get a fast build of the hull is a method that's been suggested for SibLim. Make a series of female moulds, and set them up the right way up, and then make up full length panels, lift them carefully into position with four people, then stitch, fillet and glass tape. This puts the builder under no time pressure. Then fit out the majority of the furniture. Then remove the female moulds, and lay the boat down, first on one side and then on the other, to add glass tape and glass sheathing, and to paint the bottom of the hull. Then stand her upright again to add the deck and finish off.

  • 04 Mar 2017 13:24
    Reply # 4647483 on 4647243
    David Tyler wrote:

    [sucks teeth] ... Making up full length hull panels? We're above the limit of length, I would say, and the narrower panels of a multichine hull would be floppy. It might be possible with a team of four, but altogether safer to do as Annie did and make scarphs in situ.

    (Breathing out slowly....)

    I was not suggesting that joined-panels be necessarily full length. Gougeon's rule-of-thumb length limit, 16 ft., suggests two sections per panel in this case. A slower setting epoxy would certainly help with assembly.


  • 04 Mar 2017 08:38
    Reply # 4647243 on 4645016
    David Tyler wrote:
    Jim Creighton wrote:
    David Tyler wrote:

    [sucks teeth] ... Making up full length hull panels? We're above the limit of length, I would say, and the narrower panels of a multichine hull would be floppy. It might be possible with a team of four, but altogether safer to do as Annie did and make scarphs in situ.

    What thickness of ply are we looking at? What are the limiting factors for length?
    I assume 12mm ply, as per SibLim and Bare Bones.

    The Gougeon Brothers recommend a maximum length of 16ft for panel-on-frame construction, and say that the problem is the time needed to mix and spread glue, fix the panel and then clean up. 

    Gougeon Bros dont get me wrong great stuff at the time but there are better epoxies out there. We can mix 5 litre buckets of MAS and get it spread applied and have tea so this is no longer an argument the diffeance is in the time curve from mixing gougeon epoxies start reacting almost stright away so you get a evenish line through the center of a graph of time and cure. With mas nothing much happens once you start the mix and stays along the lower line of the graph then it will kick in in a stepper curve.

    this allows much more open time so no running around with sweat dripping off your nose etc 


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