New here - very excited!

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  • 29 Jul 2018 15:43
    Reply # 6403383 on 6399969
    Anonymous wrote: Thank you Nils, That is very encouraging. I will have a look at your photos and see if I can come up with a solution. My first thoughts were a sleeve inside the mast and a taberacle, so to raise the mast I would use an A frame (which I already have) like you use your 2m pole, rise it up on the tabernacle hinge then the insert will drop down through the deck into a clamp mounted down on the keel. The insert would probably need to be at least 2-3 metres up inside the mast.

    Regards

    Andrew


    Nils, I've looked at the photos - very impressive! Please can you tell me, when you are lowering the mast, how do you lift it up to the height of the hinge?

    Regards

    Andrew

    Hello Andrew, and also Bill,

    Yes, I suppose you can find a solution the way you describe.  Just a practical hint:  I use 4 bushings (bearings) of a plastic material called POM to ensure low friction and at the same time a narrow clearance fit between the sleeve and the mast sections.  The two lower bushings line the sleeve up tightly to the lower mast section, while the two upper bushings line the upper mast section tightly up to the sleeve.  Thereby there is no tangible slack (play) in the mast when it's upright.  In the first version I used bushings in aluminium.  However, aluminium seizes so badly on aluminium, that I hardly got the sleeve off again.  I tried with copper paste on the contact surfaces, and that helped, but that brown stuff makes a real mess, and I therefore changed to bushings in POM as suggested by the guys at the mechanical workshop.  So if the mast and your insert are in aluminium, there should be a different material in between them where they contact.

    About how I lift before the lowering:  Yes, as Bill comments, it is only the sleeve I need to lift.  The sleeve weighs about 16 kg, and most times I have simply lifted it without any lifting aid, but with the added friction this has been on the limit of what I have been able to lift above shoulder height.  That isn't good for the blood pressure for a guy of my age, so for example last Friday when I lowered the mast, I unshackled the halyard block from the yard, attached it to the handle I have at the sleeve's lower end and used this 4:1 purchase halyard tackle to lift the sleeve.

    Off topic: I uploaded a picture of the mast after it was lowered. It was during the lunar eclipse with the Moon approximately in the South, which means close to spring tide, so even with the mast down I had to wait a few hours for clearance under bridges, so I went to sleep on board.  A beautiful night on the fjord!

    Regards

    Nils

    Last modified: 29 Jul 2018 20:37 | Anonymous member
  • 26 Jul 2018 22:30
    Reply # 6399998 on 6392651

    It's just a sleeve that you slide up to expose the hinge isn't it?


    Very cool design anyways.


    Bill

     

  • 26 Jul 2018 22:04
    Reply # 6399969 on 6399906
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hello Andrew,

    You Wrote:

    "The other main issue I have is that I just hate paying £160 to unstep the mast and would love to have a design that will allow me to lower and raise the mast myself. Maybe a 27 footer is just too big to even consider that?"

    No, your 27 footer is not too big to consider that, I think.  

    Thank you Nils, That is very encouraging. I will have a look at your photos and see if I can come up with a solution. My first thoughts were a sleeve inside the mast and a taberacle, so to raise the mast I would use an A frame (which I already have) like you use your 2m pole, rise it up on the tabernacle hinge then the insert will drop down through the deck into a clamp mounted down on the keel. The insert would probably need to be at least 2-3 metres up inside the mast.

    Regards

    Andrew


    Nils, I've looked at the photos - very impressive! Please can you tell me, when you are lowering the mast, how do you lift it up to the height of the hinge?

    Regards

    Andrew

  • 26 Jul 2018 22:01
    Reply # 6399968 on 6393110
    Anonymous wrote:

    Welcome aboard, Andrew.  Keep an eye out in your area: Annie and Weaverbird are cruising around the Inner Hebrides at the moment, I think.

    I take it you like to remove the mast when you haul the boat for the winter?  I'm building a 26ft boat at the moment, which is going to have a tabernacle. That might be the way for you to go.  If you go to the Members' Area and use the Google search at the top of the text, you can look for the threads on tabernacles.  Or just scroll through the list of topics in the Technical forum.  Best of luck with your conversion - I'm sure and your family will love the rig.

    And because it's so easy, you may find you enjoy sailing to windward more!

    Annie, I'm sorry I didn't reply directly to you. I was confused when you mentioned Annie & Weaverbird. We are meeting up soon. Good luck with your build, I've been looking at the blog.

    Best regards

    Andrew

  • 26 Jul 2018 21:54
    Reply # 6399906 on 6396697
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hello Andrew,

    You Wrote:

    "The other main issue I have is that I just hate paying £160 to unstep the mast and would love to have a design that will allow me to lower and raise the mast myself. Maybe a 27 footer is just too big to even consider that?"

    No, your 27 footer is not too big to consider that, I think.  

    Thank you Nils, That is very encouraging. I will have a look at your photos and see if I can come up with a solution. My first thoughts were a sleeve inside the mast and a taberacle, so to raise the mast I would use an A frame (which I already have) like you use your 2m pole, rise it up on the tabernacle hinge then the insert will drop down through the deck into a clamp mounted down on the keel. The insert would probably need to be at least 2-3 metres up inside the mast.

    Regards

    Andrew


  • 25 Jul 2018 00:40
    Reply # 6396697 on 6392651

    Hello Andrew,

    You Wrote:

    "The other main issue I have is that I just hate paying £160 to unstep the mast and would love to have a design that will allow me to lower and raise the mast myself. Maybe a 27 footer is just too big to even consider that?"

    No, your 27 footer is not too big to consider that, I think.  I happen to have a 27’ boat myself (not a slim and nice as yours; mine has a more chubby motor sailer hull), and I have a mast that that I raise and lower all alone.  The mast has a hinge with a sleeve over.  I designed the mast and got it built by a local workshop in 2002.  My boat is berthed in a canal where I can go out on the fjord by passing two bridges where one lifts and one swings to the side so I don’t need to raise and lower the mast for every trip to the fjord.  Sometimes though, it is nice to have the chance to raise and lower to pass outside the times the bridges are manned.

    In the present version I am happy with the mast as I feel I have full control when I raise and lower it alone and can stop in any position if needed (with the first version I felt I needed 3 or 4 arms to manage it properly).  This solution makes it an easy job to reach the mast top, like today when I had the mast down to fit a new halyard.  I also use the lowered mast to hang a tarp over when I choose to make a snow tent in winters, then I don’t need any special planks or tubes to hold up the tent.

    On my profile you can find more pictures of the mast.  I use a wire jack to do the lifting and lowering, and use a 2 metres long removable “lever tube” to give the necessary moment arm you can see on the photos.

    If you like what you see, I can give you more details.

    Cheers

    Nils Myklebust

    Trondheim, Norway


  • 23 Jul 2018 22:49
    Reply # 6394635 on 6394043
    Anonymous wrote:

    Andrew

    Welcome.  You are already in very good hands. 

    Living in Oban, a black and white Collie and (hopefully) a junk rigged boat.  That sounds like the winning ticket in the lottery of life.  

    Jonathan and Beeley (Black and white Collie, occasionally green offshore.)   

    Thanks Jonathan.

    I'm always mindful of how lucky I am to be living here and doing what I do. I can't wait to get my teeth into this project.

    Our collie/springer Flynn is the best companion we could have and we want to make his sailing life as comfortable and stress-free as possible. We're always aware that he doesn't have a choice, he has to do what we do. I wish we could bring our Cat too but I think she would freak.

    Andrew

  • 23 Jul 2018 22:43
    Reply # 6394634 on 6393626
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hello Andrew,

    I should be coming south in Weaverbird past Dunstaffnage and Oban in about the middle of next week. Would you like to meet up at the boat? It's always much easier to give sound advice when actually aboard, rather than looking at photos.

    Woah! Yes please!!!! Are you able to come into Dunstaffnage? I'd be happy to buy you lunch at the Wide Mouth Frog. I'm very flexible time-wise so just let me know. Or if Oban is better for you, that's good too. There are some new pontoons there. Cheers.

    Andrew

  • 23 Jul 2018 18:27
    Reply # 6394043 on 6392651

    Andrew

    Welcome.  You are already in very good hands. 

    Living in Oban, a black and white Collie and (hopefully) a junk rigged boat.  That sounds like the winning ticket in the lottery of life.  

    Jonathan and Beeley (Black and white Collie, occasionally green offshore.)   

  • 23 Jul 2018 14:59
    Reply # 6393626 on 6392651

    Hello Andrew,

    I should be coming south in Weaverbird past Dunstaffnage and Oban in about the middle of next week. Would you like to meet up at the boat? It's always much easier to give sound advice when actually aboard, rather than looking at photos.

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