Double Sheeting

  • 14 May 2018 01:35
    Reply # 6152979 on 6127132

    Thanks Lynda, I will look up the book... Cutting the Dragon's Tail 

    I appreciate the response.

  • 13 May 2018 16:12
    Reply # 6152111 on 6127132
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    I have double sheeting on my 20 foot cruising boat, and I like it quite a lot. It keeps the cockpit clear of the mainsail sheets, and makes for much easier backwinding of the mizzen. I would honestly hate to give it up, though I do understand your concerns about lots of lines. Such trade-offs!

    Shemaya

    Last modified: 13 May 2018 16:17 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 13 May 2018 12:56
    Reply # 6151742 on 6127132
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Michael Young wrote:

    Hi Everyone, 

    I have a Tom Colvin Gazelle. Both the main and the foresail are double sheeted meaning a sheet set on the port side and another on the starboard side. I am wanting to change this to a single sheeting in the center. Any reason why this shouldn’t be done?

    Hi Michael,

    David and I had a three masted Colvin boat and we also had double sheets.  While we changed the 'more traditional' aspects of Colvin's rigging plan,  we stuck with the double sheeting system which we found to be absolutely brilliant in many ways.   If you go to the library,  and look for the PDf of our book,  Cutting the Dragon's Tail,  you will find David's diagrams and text dealing with the whys and wherefores of the changes we made and our decision to keep the double sheeting system.    We now have a much smaller boat where,  unfortunately, we cannot have a double sheeting system,  but it would be nice if we could . . .   Lynda

    Last modified: 13 May 2018 13:07 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 10 May 2018 15:23
    Reply # 6147025 on 6139966
    Eric Andlauer wrote:
    Michael Young wrote:

     Any thoughts?

    Bonjour

    On Mingming, on a slow process, i'm experimenting what I called Lambda sheeting. The iidea is to have a two sheeting points on the batten one at the aft end and the other about one therd of the batten length forward.low tec- low cost-wingsail demonstrator

    With a flexible (aft part) batten it allow to have a curved profile with a flat sail.

    It's a two step experimentation, the lambda sheeting is limited, as such, on a "flat saile" as the forward part of the sail (the most important) must remain flat to prevent "S-bending". It could be used, for example, in conjonction with a forward barel cut sail and flexible rear battens.

    the second stage of the experimentation deals with a junkwing with a profile on the forward part of the sail and a flap at the rear. Then the lambda sheeting would allow a flexible junkwing.

    With a lambda sheeting, the sheets are separated by the sail and are less messy than if both sheetings are linked to the leach.

    Eric


    Hey Eric,

    Referencing Sleive's files, I have to ask the question:

    Doesn't your approach - at least in step 1 - put the curve at exactly the wrong spot?  The aft section of the sail is usually kept as flat as possible because a hook in that area contributes mostly drag.  It's camber in the forward 1/3 that makes the lift to windward.

    Michael - are your forward sheets constantly getting hung up on something?

    Last modified: 10 May 2018 15:28 | Anonymous member
  • 06 May 2018 22:24
    Reply # 6139966 on 6137238
    Michael Young wrote:

     Any thoughts?

    Bonjour

    On Mingming, on a slow process, i'm experimenting what I called Lambda sheeting. The iidea is to have a two sheeting points on the batten one at the aft end and the other about one therd of the batten length forward.low tec- low cost-wingsail demonstrator

    With a flexible (aft part) batten it allow to have a curved profile with a flat sail.

    It's a two step experimentation, the lambda sheeting is limited, as such, on a "flat saile" as the forward part of the sail (the most important) must remain flat to prevent "S-bending". It could be used, for example, in conjonction with a forward barel cut sail and flexible rear battens.

    the second stage of the experimentation deals with a junkwing with a profile on the forward part of the sail and a flap at the rear. Then the lambda sheeting would allow a flexible junkwing.

    With a lambda sheeting, the sheets are separated by the sail and are less messy than if both sheetings are linked to the leach.

    Eric


    Last modified: 06 May 2018 22:27 | Anonymous member
  • 05 May 2018 16:59
    Reply # 6137238 on 6127132

    I agree that there is enough spagetti on deck without adding a whole additional set. So I am looking at reducing it to a single. I see the longer batten I think Arne does. Maybe this would make it feasible. If I can’t ... I might go to a gaff foresail. One advantage to that would be educational for the scouts who charter the boat. Any thoughts?

  • 01 May 2018 15:13
    Reply # 6127776 on 6127132
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Michael,
    I have only had one fully fanned junksail, and on this the leech leant over forward, as on Colvin’s sails. I had a single sheet on it, and as a result, the sail, boom and battens caught the sheet every time I tacked, until I learned to throw the sheet bundle over when coming about. Gybing was even worse. As a result of this experience; I have done my best to make the sheeted part of the leech vertical  -  or even leaning a bit aft.  -  on every sail design after that (1992).

    If your present sails are old and tired, could I suggest you make a new set to a new design?

     

    Arne


    Last modified: 02 May 2018 22:10 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 01 May 2018 08:34
    Reply # 6127486 on 6127132

    Hi Michael, sails are generally double sheeted when there is not enough space aft of the sail to get the correct angles on the sheet. So where the leech of the foresail is very close to the aft mast would be a good example of this. And also where the aft most sail reaches almost to the transom, as I think may be the case with some two masted Colvin boats. 

    It would be best to have a read through the sheeting sections in Practical Junk Rig to see whether you would be able to run single sheets on your sails. Gosh, there is enough mainsheet flopping around and getting tangled up with a single sheet system. Double sheets could be a nightmare!

    Last modified: 01 May 2018 08:35 | Anonymous member
  • 01 May 2018 00:31
    Message # 6127132

    Hi Everyone, 

    I have a Tom Colvin Gazelle. Both the main and the foresail are double sheeted meaning a sheet set on the port side and another on the starboard side. I am wanting to change this to a single sheeting in the center. Any reason why this shouldn’t be done?

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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