Hasler Micro-Cruiser?

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  • 29 Mar 2017 07:52
    Reply # 4697371 on 4678927

    Sounds like you had a wonderful sail: I love ghosting along in hardly any wind and felt more than a touch of envy.  I confess I'd have probably has a glass of home-brewed beer rather than the tea (although perhaps both, with a decent interval between them).

  • 28 Mar 2017 20:10
    Reply # 4696239 on 4678927

    First sail of the season today.  I motored out of Arisaig to run the engine and test the new Bruntons Autoprop.  I was getting five knots at 1500 rpm.  The engine red-lines at 3600 rpm, so I think she should punch up into a sea and a breeze compared to the former prop.  The Bruntons is self-pitching; the former prop was merely feathering, and would't punch its way out of a paper bag.


    So: half-way from Arisaig to Eigg in the Sound of  Sleat.  Wall to wall blue skies.  Blazing sunshine.  Great columns of smoke from hill-heather burning on Skye and Knoydart and Morar.  Zero to near-zero wind conditions.  The boat trickled on regardless, and tacked without effort.  We ran back into Arisaig.  I didn't hoist the cruising-chute as the breeze wouldn't have lifted it (purists take note!). But the big junk-sail trickled us into Arisaig Channel, and we beat up there, puffed along by the first whisper of the spring flood.


    A glorious wee sail.  No stimulants either (except two-bag tea)!

  • 28 Mar 2017 19:57
    Reply # 4696231 on 4678927

    Perhaps I should say that Ihave never used any sort of sleep antagonist.  But I have a fair bit of experience of lack of sleep, as a fisherman and as a single-hander.  Last time I was out, we did 53 hours on deck, but we're running out of steam by that point.  Another boat, 3 hours each second night, 90 minutes each alternate night, for a ten-day trip.  No stimulants at all.  It is possible that I have done 72 hours at the fishing, and also single-handed under sail - indeed, that is very likely.  But it is not enjoyable at all.  Be honest - the last few hours of 24 isn't much fun either.


    So - does it not make sense to consider the use of sleep-antagonists on the rare occasions that they might be useful, and used within very strictly defined parameters?

  • 22 Mar 2017 12:12
    Reply # 4682335 on 4682154
    Graham Cox wrote:

    The original 14ft 5in prototype was built in England and test sailed by Blondie.  I wonder if she is still around somewhere?

    Just one reference that I can find: 

    "LONER", all 14'10". She went to New York eventually and may still be there somewhere.
  • 22 Mar 2017 10:23
    Reply # 4682154 on 4678927

    I am back aboard Arion now.  The illustrations of Loner appear on page 75 of my 1976 edition of Henderson's book.  There is just a profile and a midsection showing a human figure in various postures, which indicate Hasler's thoughts about working the vessel.  Here is what Henderson says about the design: 

    The H G Hasler designed Loner, a midget ocean cruiser for singlehanded sailing.  Her dimensions are LOA 14ft 5in, LWL 11ft 3in, beam 6ft 3in, draft 4ft, displacement 3000lbs, sail area 155 sq ft.  Her deep keel keeps the 1200 pounds of ballast low and provides some windward ability for clawing off a lee shore in a blow. (Courtesy of The Spray.)

    Charles Ure's boat (the one that disappeared at sea) was a 20ft version (the design was called the Loner 20), which was built in NZ by Derek Kellsall in foam sandwich and shipped to England.  The original 14ft 5in prototype was built in England and test sailed by Blondie.  I wonder if she is still around somewhere?

    Thanks, Bryan for the notes about the trans-Tasman race.

    Last modified: 22 Mar 2017 10:26 | Anonymous member
  • 21 Mar 2017 21:51
    Reply # 4681181 on 4681064
    Annie Hill wrote:
    Bryan Tuffnell wrote:
    The midsection is simply the smallest area that a sitting adult can occupy; the rest of the boat follows.
    Should read: 'The midsection is simply the smallest area that an immoderately lofty sitting adult can occupy'

    There's more than enough room for a person of normal stature.  However it does seem to be, dare I say it, a very male thing to put the tallest possible person  in the smallest possible boat (think Sea Egg) and then to take the longest possible passage in the maximum state of discomfort.

    What about Serge Testa's voyage in Acrohc Australis for a 500 day misery! Part of me loves the notion that you can circumnavigate in an 11 foot boat. The rest of me quakes. Another tiny but failed circumnavigator is Bill Dunlop's 9ft Wind's Will, and there's Bill Verity's Nonoalca and Gerry Speiss' Yankee Girl, Tom Maclean's 9 footer, Hugo Vihlen's April Fool and Farther's Day at under 6 ft, and Tom McNally's Big C, all Atlantic crossers. And capping the lot, G'day Mate, three and a half feet, across the Tasmania Sea. Niagara Falls in a barrel?

    I mocked up Farthing's interior in chipboard. My 6'1" frame had to curl in a semi-fetal position to fit in the seat: knees high, feet not much lower than bum level, head JUST below deck. To turn around I needed to twist over the berth; dressing was easiest when lying on the bunk. Farthing is a narrow boat. Everything was possible, but...

    Last modified: 21 Mar 2017 22:15 | Anonymous member
  • 21 Mar 2017 20:54
    Reply # 4681087 on 4681036
    Iain Grigor wrote:

    OK, perhaps this is a taboo subject..... But I notice from Graham Cox's post below that he helped David Lewis prepare Ice Bird for the voyage round Antartica.  In my edition of  the book of that epic voyage, Lewis (a doctor) has a few comments on the use of amphetamines as a sleep antagonist.  But can we update that?  What about Modafinil, used in the treatment of ADHD, for instance?  There is a lot of  anecdotal evidence that it works well as a sleep antagonist.  And, of course, it is legal to have and use in many jurisdictions - unlike amphetamine.


    Here is what Lewis says.  "Dextoamphetamine Sulphate. 5mgm tablets. One three times a day.  This is an extremely powerful sleep antagonist.  Methylphenidate hydrochloride, 10mgm tablets (Ritalin, Ciba), is a less drastic alternative.  The dose is two tablets three times a day".


    That was published in 1975.  Has modern pharmacology, I wonder, improved on what Lewis has to say?

    Personally, I prefer John Guzzwell's robust approach to keeping watch at night.  Come bed time, put on your jammies (not that I wear such a thing), wind up the clock and turn in.  If you're sailing around in a 20 footer, you might get run down, but you won't hurt anyone else.  With a properly-sorted out boat and junk rig of course (yes, I know I'm sounding smug) there is rarely much reason for staying awake for unreasonable lengths of time and most people can manage 24 hours without a problem.  it's this racing business that makes it an issue: generally speaking, if you're tired, heave to and go to sleep if you don't like carrying on.  As for taking amphetamine - when I see what it does to users in NZ, I think I'd rather have a naturally than an unnaturally-altered state of consciousness. 

    I know sailing in ice is different - I've done it.  But it's not enough simply to be awake, you need also to have quick reactions to avoid the growlers.  Would Modafinal keep you sharp, too?

    However, I could see that just knowing you have a 'sleep antagonist' in the locker could be conducive to peace of mind.  Any single-handers want to give it a try?


  • 21 Mar 2017 20:44
    Reply # 4681064 on 4679538
    Bryan Tuffnell wrote:
    The midsection is simply the smallest area that a sitting adult can occupy; the rest of the boat follows.
    Should read: 'The midsection is simply the smallest area that an immoderately lofty sitting adult can occupy'

    There's more than enough room for a person of normal stature.  However it does seem to be, dare I say it, a very male thing to put the tallest possible person  in the smallest possible boat (think Sea Egg) and then to take the longest possible passage in the maximum state of discomfort.

    I am all for building a boat around a person, but hey, we can have a bit of comfort, too!

    Seriously though, I too had never heard of Loner.  Probably because she hardly went anywhere before disappearing.  But I'm surprised that Blondie didn't think a little more laterally and dispense with the relatively heavy displacement, long keel concept altogether: he was so often ahead of his time.

  • 21 Mar 2017 20:24
    Reply # 4681036 on 4678927

    OK, perhaps this is a taboo subject..... But I notice from Graham Cox's post below that he helped David Lewis prepare Ice Bird for the voyage round Antartica.  In my edition of  the book of that epic voyage, Lewis (a doctor) has a few comments on the use of amphetamines as a sleep antagonist.  But can we update that?  What about Modafinil, used in the treatment of ADHD, for instance?  There is a lot of  anecdotal evidence that it works well as a sleep antagonist.  And, of course, it is legal to have and use in many jurisdictions - unlike amphetamine.


    Here is what Lewis says.  "Dextoamphetamine Sulphate. 5mgm tablets. One three times a day.  This is an extremely powerful sleep antagonist.  Methylphenidate hydrochloride, 10mgm tablets (Ritalin, Ciba), is a less drastic alternative.  The dose is two tablets three times a day".


    That was published in 1975.  Has modern pharmacology, I wonder, improved on what Lewis has to say?

  • 21 Mar 2017 11:58
    Reply # 4679839 on 4678927

    There was once a short note and a profile drawing of Loner in - almost certainly - Yachting Monthly.  Might a reference show-up in the Index to that magazine?

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